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Full text of "Brown's bookstall. no. 1-77"

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BROWN'S s® 



BOOK-STALL 



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1892 



A. Brown & Co., 

Booksellers and Stationers, 

Aberdeen. 



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INDEX 





Page. 




A Girl of the Town, 


39 


Lorna Doone's Popularity, Secret of, 


An Eight Hours Bloke on Spring Poets, 


5i 


Macaulay and his niece, Alice Trevelyan, ... 


A Toast, 


123 


My Books, 


A Fantasia in the Moonlight, 


191 


My Books, 


Aberdeen about 1820, ... 


201 


Missionary Humour, ... 


An Auld Yule Tide, ... 


205 


Notes : — 


Brown's Aberdeen Book-Stall, 1, 13, 31, 45 


, 61, 77, 


Our Paper Knife, ... 


93, 109, 125, 141, 157, 179. 




Fact and Fiction, ... 


Burns, Robert, ... 


11 


Fact and Fiction, ... 


Bradshaw Culture, 


11 


Rhodium Sidus, ... 


Best Two Books, 


23 


Scattered Leaves, 


Ballad of Book Hunters, 


25 


" Take heed ; have open eye," 


Book Lending, ... 


39 


Snap Shots, 


Bookworms, How to protect Books from, . 


59 


Cutlets, 


Bookworm's Story, 


59 


Here and There, ... 


Books, My, 


69 


Here and There, ... 


Booksellers, C. D. Warner on 


69 


By the Bye, 


Blunders in the Bible, ... 


. 87, 103 


Flakes, 


Bibliophile, The, 


91 


Nemo Me Impune Lacessit, ... 


Book Buyers, Good Rules for, 


107 


November, 1st, 1892, 


Books, Sir Thomas Overbury on, 


169 


Our Aim, 


Cuckoo Song, ... 


7i 


On Reading, 


Clubs in Aberdeen, 


85 


Oh ! what must it be to be there, 


Christmas Puzzle, 


. 185 


Old Friends, 


Christmas Puzzle Solution, 


207 


Our Trumpet, ... 


Don, Founding of New Bridge, 


169 


Our Illustrations, 


Gosse, Edmund, on the " Best Books," 


37 


Ourselves Again, 


Gilfillan, Rev. G., and his Parrot, 


42 


Printer, The, 


Gladstone and his Pigeon Holes, 


75 


" Quhat thay say — Lat yame say," ... 


Hugo, Victor, ... 


8 


Red Tape in Russia, ... 


How to protect Books from Bookworms, 


59 


Right of Voting, 


Is it so? 


137 


Sarah Battle on Whist, 


In the Want Column, 


169 


Slavey Enslaved, 


Jew, A, in Aberdeen, 


87 


Skene, Mr. William Forbes, 


Just so ! 


88 


Silverado Squatters, ... 


Jamie Blythe's Clyack Sang, 


193 


Some Xmas Nos. of '92, 


Laugh a Little Bit, 


103 


Two Old Friends, 


L'Envoy, 


177 


'Twixt Shine and Storm, 




No. i, 



JANUARY 



1892, 



Jpth Jpish and Jjf ercantile Insurance €0. , 

IN WHICH IS NOW MERGED 

THE SCOTTISH PROVINCIAL ASSURANCE CO. 



FIRE, LIFE, AND ANNUITIES. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter and Special Acts of Parliament, 
Total Assets exceed £10,000, 000. 

The Funds of the lyife Department are not liable for obligation's under the Fire 
department, nor are the Funds of the Fire Department liable for obligations under the 
ife Department. In this Company, therefore, the Investments for the Life LV 
tent are kept entirety separate from those of the Fire Department, as set forth in t£ie 
alance Sheet. 



Income for 1890, 



£2,487,839. 



GEORGE COLLIE, Esq., Advocate. i WILLIAM YEATS, Esq. of Auquharney. 

JAMES F. LUMSDEN, Esq., Advocate. JOHN WHYTE, Esq., Advocate. 

ALEX. M. OGSTON, Esq. op Ardoe. I JOHN COOK, Esq., Banker. 

Local Manager— GEORGE W. W. BARCLAY. 
Fire Superintendent— J). B. MILNE. 



•ospectases and full information as to several important features recently introduced can be 
obtained at the Chief Offices, Branches,, and Agencies. 

CHIEF OFFICES : 

pINBURGH— 64 PRINCKS STREET ; LONDON— 6 1 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E.G. 

Aberdeen Office : 91 UNION STREET. 



PURCHASE 

ALL YOUR REQULSLTES FOR THE 

GARDEN AND FARM 

FROM 

CARDNO &, 

DARLING, 

ll Bridge Street, 

Aberdeen. 

JAMES HARDY & CO, 

ffewellers, ifflatchmakers, and fjpcians. 



Alll should see our Extensive and Handsome Premises, containing the 
Largest and Best Selected Stock of 

JEWELLERY, CLOCKS, SPECTACLES, SILVER GOODS, and 
ELECTRO-PLATE in the North of Scotland. 

SEE WINDOWS. All Goods marked in Plain Figures at 

JAMES HARDY & CO., 

53 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN, 

AND 

74 PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH. 




No. i. 



JANUARY 



1892 



©ur Him, 



j£E believe Horace says that "he 
has carried every point who has 
mingled the useful with the agreeable." 



Our aim in the present publication is 
to mingle the useful and the agreeable, 
or, as W. S. Gilbert puts it, " to gild the 
philosophic pill." 



If we succeed in doing this to the 
satisfaction of our friends and ourselves, 
" Brown's Book-Stall," will appear at 
regular intervals. 



In the present number a well-known 
pen contributes an account of the open- 
ing of the original book-stall over a 
century ago by Alexander Brown, who 
afterwards twice held the Provostship of 
the city. 



Brown's Hberfceen :Boofe*5talL 



No. I. 



IJIMBERDEEN, perhaps the most Radical 
S® city in the Empire, was at one time 
considered the Oxford of Scotland. Is it 
the principle of heredity operating on 
men, which has to a certain extent pre- 
served that fine, old, and altogether re- 
spectable conservative feeling which un- 
doubtedly exists in the town and the 
surrounding district ? For in the town 
and district the old Catholicism was 
never entirely extirpated. There, was 
the stronghold of the newer Episcopacy, 
where, in spite of all that the Covenanters 
could do, it lingered longest, suffered less 
severely than elsewhere, and readily re- 
vived. There, in more recent times, was 
the "dead sea of Moderatism." There, 
reside some of the oldest families in the 
kingdom, some of whom carry their pedi- 
grees and their titles back for hundreds 
of years. All these things are influ- 
ences, silently but surely operative, 
and can be seen by those who look under 
the surface, but are not to be seen to the 
same extent in such towns as Glasgow 
and Dundee. 

One proof ofthe existence of this rever- 
ence for antiquity is evidenced by many 
business firms in the city retaining their 
old titles long after the founders have 
been dead and gone. " Men may come 
and men may go," but these old firms, 



Brown's Bookstall. 




PENMANSHIP. 



"IT is really scandalous that men holding 
public positions should send to a Court of 
Justice manuscript which is absolutely illegible." 
Such was the recent remark of a distinguished 
judge, and reflections of this nature make it 
painfully evident that penmanship does not re? 
ceive the due attention that its importance demands. The above illustration repre- 
sents seamanship — and also pen-man-ship. The one is necessary to guide the .ship 
across the ocean, and the other to guide one's fortunes through the busy world. Great 
stress is laid, in youth, on the proper position in which to hold the pen, while the 
suitability of the pen itself is neglected. 

There is nothing so dear as a cheap pen. It spoils the hand — spoils the paper — 
and spoils the temper. 

BAII-pointFd PENS 

Are constructed on a scientific basis. A rolling ball has of all bodies the greatest 
momentum with the least resistance. Applied to pen points the outcome is astonish- 
ing^ pleasant. There are twelve varieties of Ball-Pointkd Pens, which, experience 
proves, will suit all hands. The following are the most popular — 

For Book-keeping, 516E.F., 52 if. 

„ General Correspondence, 516F., 526M. 

„ Fluent Writing, 532F., 537M. 
If uncertain — buy an assorted box, and choose a pen to suit your hand. 

While at your stationer's also ask for a 

FEDERATION" PENHOLDER. 




It prevents the pen from blotting when laid on the desk, and gives a firm and comfort- 
able grip for the fingers. 

Manufactured for ORMISTON & GLASS, LONDON, 

AND SUPPLIED BY ALL STATIONERS. 



Brown's Book-Stau,. 



changed indeed in men, manners, and, 
it may be, in place, go on, still retaining 
the old business and the old name. 

Brown's Book-Stau, may justly be 
reckoned one of these. A generation 
has come and gone since a " Brown " had 
any connection with it, and of the five 
individuals who at various times have 
been partners, only two of them were 
" Browns," yet the others have all been 
willing to sink their own personalities 
and loyally give honour to whom honour 
was due in the person of the founder who 
was connected with it for sixty years. 

This was Alexander Brown, the third 
son of the Rev. William Brown, the first 
Secession minister of Craigdam (born 
1728, ordained 1752, died 1801), a man of 
marked individuality, of abounding zeal 
and untiring activity, and whose influ- 
ence for good spread far and wide, and 
has not ceased yet. Some traits of his 
character are given in a booklet (" Craig- 
dam and its Ministers "), published by the 
firm.* There is yet this additional one, 
which is worth preservation. 

In building up the Craigdam congre- 
gation, the novelty of the doctrines and 
the earnestness and zeal with which 
these were proclaimed drew large audi- 
ences ; and large audiences in themselves 
have a tendency to keep together, from 
various reasons. One farm servant who 
came from a long distance away, frankly 
admitted that the powerful magnet 
which drew him for miles to the church 
every Sabbath was not the sermons, but 
the bright eyes and the comely looks of 
a young lass who was one of Mr. Brown's 
members, and to whom he had lost his 
heart. Whether in consequence of his 
regular attendance, his kindly glances, 
and his honeyed words (without the first 
the last two would have been certainly 
useless), his suit prospered, and when he 
got a farm^of his own, but at a consider- 
able distance from Craigdam, Jeanie be- 
came his wife, and, of course, was 
married by her own minister. After the 
ceremony there was an entertainment, 
and the company were handsomely 

*See Advt., p. 10 



treated. Mr Brown had been narrowly 
scrutinizing the husband, and watching 
all the proceedings, which were of a free 
and jovial character ; perhaps rather 
more so than he approved of. Be- 
fore leaving, in reply to the toast of his 
health, after thanking the company 
for the honour done him, and giving 
some exhortation to the husband, he 
turned to the new-married wife, and 
couthily addressing her as one of his 
own flock, he said — "Noo, Jeanie, my 
lass, I'm very blithe to see you married, 
and weel married, I hope. You've got a 
good-looking husband, a good doon- 
sitting, a braw house, and plenty o' 
frien's — but, Jeanie, I've missed ane I 
would have liket to meet wi' here " — the 
company wondered, but he continued — 
" Christ was bidden to the marriage at 
Cana, an' He cam' ; ye've maybe for- 
gotten to bid Him, but it's no too late ; He 
winna tak' it ill to be bidden yet ; and O, 
Jeanie, if He comes He'll turn a' your 
bread into manna and your water into 
wine, and a' your joys into foretastes o' 
heaven itsel'." Thus plainly, faith- 
fully, and affectionately did Mr Brown 
deal with the members of his flock. 
Need it be added that they were mem- 
bers of his flock to the last of their lives. 
After enjoying and profiting by the 
services of Mr. Cowie (afterwards a 
celebrated minister in Huntly), who 
was then tutor in Mr. Brown's family, 
Alexander, like his two brothers, John 
and William, migrated to Aberdeen, 
which was then considered the " I^and 
of Goshen " for the young people of the 
district, if they were to be anything else 
than farmers. John, the eldest, was a 
student of medicine there, and William 
was apprenticed to a merchant or shop- 
keeper. He went south to Dundee, 
turned bookseller in Edinburgh ; edited 
some newspapers ; became entitled by 
his rhyming productions to a place 
among the " Bards of Bon-Accord " (see 
pp. 320-26), and died in 1809. Alexander 
came specially recommended to the care 
of Mr. Knight, bookseller in the Gallow- 
gate, whose shop was then, as now, No. 
12 ; was slightly projecting, and was 



Brown's Book-Staix. 



JnipOFtciliL JDOOxvS Oliphant, Anderson, and Ferrier. 

Letters of Samuel Rutherford. 

New Edition. With a Sketch of his Life, Notices of his Correspondents, Glossary, and List of his; Works. By 
Rev. Andrew Bonar, D.D., Author of " Memoir and Remains of Robert Murray M'Cheyne." Large 8vo, cloth 
extra, with 14 Illustrations and Facsimile of his Writing. Price 10s. 6d." 

Kitto's Daily Bible Illustrations. 

Being Original Readings for a Year on Subjects relating to Sacred History, Biography, Geography, Antiquities, 
and Theology. Especially designed for the Family Circle. In 8 vols. , crown 8vo, with numerous Engravings. 
New Edition, Edited and Revised by J. L. Porter, D.D., LL.D.. Belfast, Author of "The Giant Cities 
of Bashan," etc. Price 28s. ; or separately, 3s. Gd. 

The Religious House of Pluscardyn. 

Convent of the Vale of Saint Andrew, in Morayshire. With Introduction, containing the History and a Descrip- 
tion of the Present State of the Mother-House of Vallis Caulium (Val des Choux) in Burgundy. By the Rev. R. 
S. Macphail, A.M., Liverpool. Illustrated by 13 Full-page Lithographs, 2 Chromo-Lithographs, a Badge of the 
Order in Gold and Colours, 5 Charters in Facsimile, and numerous Woodcuts. Only 500 Copies Printed. 
Price 21s. 

The Scots Worthies. 

By John Howie of Lochgoin. Revised from the Author's Original Edition by the Rev. W. H. Carslaw, M.A. 
The Landscapes and Ornaments by various Artists, engraved under the superintendence of Mr. Williamson ; the 
Historical Portraits by Mr. Hector Chalmers, engraved by Messrs Schenckand M 'Far lane. New Edition, demy 
8vo, cloth extra, with upwards of 150 Illustrations. Price 5s. 

A Cloud of Witnesses for the Prerogatives of Jesus Christ. 

Being the last Speeches and Testimonies of those who suffered for the Truth in Scotland since the year 1680. 
Keprintedfrom the original editions, with Explanatory and Historical Notes. By the Rev. John H. Thomson. 
Demy 8vo, cloth. Illustrated. Price 5s. 

Manliness, and other Sermons. 

By Hugh Stowell Brown. With a Preface by Rev. Dr. Maclaren, Manchester. Extra crown 8vo. Price 6s, 
Valuable Books for Students under the F.C. Welfare and Guild Schemes. 

Simon Peter: His Elarly Life and Times. 

By Charles S. Robinson, D. D. Extra crown 8vo, cloth. Price 3s. 6d. 

Life of Sir Walter Scott. 

By George Gilfillan. Crown 8vo, cloth, 2s 6d. 

A Most Interesting Story 'of Disruption Times. 
Bits from Blinkbonny; 

Or, Bell o' the Manse. A Tale of Scottish Village Life between 1841 and 1851. By John Strathesk. New 
Edition, crown 8vo, cloth extra, with 6 Original Illustrations. Price 3s 6d. With Frontispiece only, cloth, 2s. 6d.; 
paper boards, 2s. Cheap Edition, with Frontispiece, paper cover, Is ; cloth, Is 6d. 

Some of Annie S. Swan's Books. 
Maitland of Laurieston. A Family History. Price 6s. 

Aldersyde. A Border Story of Seventy Years Ago. Price 3s. 6d., 2s. 6d., and 2s. 
Who Shall Serve ? A Story for the Times. Price 2s. 6d. 
The Gates of Eden. A Story of Endeavour. Price 5s. 
Sheila. Price 6s, 

Carlowrie ; or, Among- Lothian Folk. Price 3s. 6d., 2s. 6d., and 2s. 
A Divided Houso. Price 2s. 6d. Cheap Edition, paper cover, Is. ; cloth, Is. 6d, 
Ursula Vivian, The Sister-Mother. Price 2s. 6d. Cheap Edition, paper cover, Is. ; 
cloth, Is. 6d. 

To Free Church Office-Bearers. 

A Manual of Procedure for Office-Bearers. 

Issued by Authority of the Publications Committee of the Free Church of Scotland, and intended to supply 
Elders and Deacons with Information as to the ordinary Matters that occur in the conduct of Church Business. 
Cloth limp, Gd. 

Complete Catalogues, containing books suitable for Manse, Sabbath School, Village Club, 
and Teachers' Reference Libraries, post free on application. 

OLIPHANT, ANDERSON, & FERRIER, 30 St. Mary St., Edinburgh, & Old Bailey, London. 

AND ALL BOOKSELLERS, 



Brown's Book-Staix. 



entered by some steps up from the pave- 
ment. At the time, Aberdeen, with its 
20,000 inhabitants, was compressed into 
small compass, and the Gallowgate com- 
peted with the Broadgate as to supre- 




HOUSE IN BROAD STREET WHERE BYRON 
LIVED, 1788. :T' ^ 

tnacy in stately buildings and*rnfluential 
residents, although in width .the Broad- 
gate appropriately carried off the palm. 
The Shiprow was the main approach 
grom the South, as the Gallowgate was 
Tom the North, and the last was considered 
:he fashionable street of the town, and it 
-etained this character far longer than 
;he Shiprow, for in Pigot's Directory for 
[825-6, in the list of Nobility, Gentry, 
Clergy, and Advocates, no fewer than 
iixteen names are given as resident in 
he Gallowgate, and within the recollec- 
ion of many still living, two Provosts 
esided there. That " elegant street," 
Jueen Street, was only laid out in 1776, 
md it was fourteen years after before the 
^ochlands were feued, and George 
>treet, Charlotte Street, John Street, and 
>t. Andrew Street were formed ; and it is 
musing to read that at the time this was 
hought " to be the only quarter in 



which the town could be extended to any 
great extent." 

So, from its proximity to Marischal 
College, and being the direct approach 
from Old Aberdeen, the Gallowgate was 
a good business street, and Mr. Knight's 
shop was the natural resort of the Pro- 
fessors and literary men in the city. His 
son William was appointed Professor of 
Natural Philosophy in Marischal College, 
and held this from 1822 to 1843, having 
the character of a strict disciplinarian, 
and very exacting in money fines from 
the students. On his death in 1843, the 
Rev. Dr. William Pirie conducted the 
funeral service in the College Hall, and 
alluding to Heaven in his prayer, and 
using the Scriptural language that 
"there shall be no night there," the 
irreverant nickums of students — over- 
joyed at the thought of no more fines — 
ruffed loudly, greatly to the discom- 
posure of the gravity of those present. 

Alexander Brown, a brisk, active, 
good-looking young fellow of sixteen, 
kept his eyes and his ears open to all the 
influences by which he was surrounded, 
and profited by them as he might have 
been expected to do at his age. Three 
years' service seems to have given him 
confidence in himself, and he then 
started business on his own account in a 
very humble way in a small shop on the 
north side of the Upperkirkgate, next to 
Drum's I^ane, buying the stock of a Mr. 
Taylor. He opened this shop on June 
7th, 1785, and the first entry in his Day 
Book is the sale of Guthrie's Grammar 
of Geography, price 7s. 6d. 

Aberdeen had never lost the character 
it acquired of being the most literary city 
in Scotland, Edinburgh not excepted. 
In the previous century, and during the 
Covenanting struggles, the literary pro- 
ductions of its famous doctors in behalf 
of Charles I. gave it great celebrity in 
England, where, as has been said, it was 
reckoned the Scottish Oxford. In a 
purely literary point of view, and as an 
educating centre, it even outshone Ox- 
ford, for whereas in all England they had 
but two Universities, Aberdeen could 
boast of two for itself. Spalding, in his 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



YULE'S 

SERIES OF 



0.30> » 






iri/iaFL' 






FMrj/ir 



INCLUDING AN 

Entirely New and Complete Course of Drawing, according to the 
latest Schedule of the Department, embracing— 

FREEHAND, MODEL, SCALE, 

PRACTICAL GEOMETRY, 

SOLID GEOMETRY, and SHADING, 

WITH OTHER 

EDUCATIONAL PUBLICATIONS. 



LATEST ADIDITIOnSTS- 

NBW GUIDE TO THE DRAWING EXAMINATIONS, Price Fourpence. 

A New Book (Introductory — fetters and Short Words) has been added to the 
OFFICIAL HANDWRITING SERIES of COPY BOOKS, showing the various 
combinations of long and short letters. 

Write foi Specimen Sheet of these copies — Post free. 

24 DRAWING TO SCALE TEST CARDS, for Standard IV., as recently set by the 
Science and Art Department. One Shilling per Set. 

24 SECOND GRADE FREEHAND TEST PAPERS, Revised Edition, containing 
24 of the Latest Papers set by the Department. Price Sixpence. 



Ask to see a list of Yule's Drawing Copies. You will get the best extant, and can select those you desire from 

the list. — Press Notice. 



GEORGE STEWART & Co., Publishers and Wholesale Stationers, 

92 GEORGE STREET, EDINBURGH : & 57 FARRINGDON STREET, LONDON, E.C. 
May be had from any Booksellers. 



Brown's Book-Stau,. 



" Trubles," tells us how dear this reputa- 
tion cost the city, and how it was the 
frequent battle-ground of the contending 
factions, each spoiling it in their turn 
again and again. Nowhere in all the 
land could the effects of competition in 
the dissemination of knowledge be better 
observed. Books even rare and precious 
were abundant. The numerous Professors 
and the still more numerous students 
must have them. Every Highland 
minister and each landed proprietor 
north of the Grampians, and many from 
the sunnier south, carried with "them 
from Aberdeen their love of literature, 
and formed valuable libraries. And as 
death breaks up all things, every now 
and then in the newspapers of the 
end of the last century and the be- 
ginning of the present, one comes on 
announcements of the sale of valuable 
and extensive libraries bought by the 
Aberdeen booksellers of the time, and 
advertised by them. 

A bookseller of the present day would 
hardly recognise his own business as it 
was then conducted. New books were 
delivered from the printer to him in 
their naked sheets, and he had to clothe 
them, read them, put them into his own 
mind, and then into the minds of others, 
by recommending and selling them. 

The sheets had to be folded, stitched 
together in boards, and covered with 
drab grey paper, with small printed titles 
on the back, and this was the dress 
pf all new books until about 1825, 
when gay cloth covers and gilt titles 
revolutionised the trade. Authors and 
publishers in those days depended on 
what was in the inside of a book ; the 
books were like oysters, and had little 
attractions on their outside, whereas 
now-a-days most books — like a great 
many men — are more or less of a failure, 
according as they are dressed, and all 
sorts of devices are now employed to 
catch the eye, everything being now 
sacrificed to asthetics. 




If you want to get the fruit off the tree 
of knowledge always makeuse of a biblio- 
pole. 



Our Paper-Knife. 



" Mr Marion Crawford is the most 
astonishingly varied and versatile of 
modern novelists ; he certainly never 
repeats himself." So says Andrew L,ang, 
and the volume recently added to the 
uniform 3s. 6d. edition of Crawford's 
works fully bears out this opinion. " A 
Cigarette- Maker's Romance" is original 
and interesting. 



For those who have not yet made 
acquaintance with Mr. Crawford's works, 
and who want a good novel, we say, 
" Read it." To those who have read the 
former books, it is sufficient recom- 
mendation to say, it is as good as the 
best of them. 



Amongst recent fiction, " An Impera- 
tive Duty," by W. D. Howells, takes a 
high place. It has rather more " go" in 
it, and less of that minute analysis and 
introspection which is overdone in some 
of his stories. It is the latest addition to 
Mr. David Douglas's cheap and charming 
library of American authors. 



By-the-bye, is Howell's a Socialist ? 
There is a decidedly Socialistic ring 
about the concluding sentence, where he 
speaks of " the despite in which hard 
work is held all the world over, and has 
always followed the children of the man 
who earns his bread with his hands, 
especially if he earns other people's 
bread too." 



"The general law that the average 
intelligence likes the best that which it 
understands with the least effort," may 
account for the popularity of Annie S. 
Swan's books. They are certainly not 
deep, nor very clever — so far as we have 
discovered, though there, perhaps, the 
fault lies with us — yet they go off like hot 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



rolls. Her " Ay res of Studleigh" is 
going in its twenty-second thousand, 
and "Who Shall Serve?" published just 
before Christmas, is following fast. 



It was recently alleged in an affidavit 
made by a doctor in lunacy, that for a 
well-to-do bachelor to go into the 
Strand, and in the course of the same 
morning spend ^5 in the purchase of 
"old books," was a ground for belief in 
his insanty and for locking him up. — 
Speaker. 



It is scarcely credible that in the last 
decade of this century of civilization the 
children of light should be so misunder- 
stood by the children of darkness. 
Would that there were more such lunatics 
at large ! 



Cheap editions seem to be the order of 
the day. A re-issue in 2s. 6d. volumes of 
William Black's novels commenced this 
month with A Daughter of Heth. 



The volume for next month will be 
The Sttange Adventures of a Phceton. 
This edition might fitly have been called 
the Jubilee edition, seeing that the 
author celebrated his fiftieth birthday in 
the end of last year. 



Andrew Liang's works are also being 
issued in a cheaper form. His " Letters 
to Dead Authors " appears this month, to 
be followed by " Books and Bookmen " 
in February. The price is now 2s. 6d. 
per volume. ■ 

Le Page's Liquid Glue is the best glue 
for use at home or in the office for 
repairing broken cloth or leather book 
covers, or indeed for any repairs for 
which a strong glue is wanted. It is 
also better than any gum for all the 
purposes for which gum is used ; no acid 
is used in its preparation, it is always 
ready for use and has no unpleasant 
smell. More than fifty-five million 
bottles have been sold. Sold in sixpenny 
bottles by A. Brown & Co., 77 Union 
Street, Aberdeen. 



IDtctor 1bwo. 




There seems to be no falling off in the 
popularity of Victor Hugo, to judge from 
some statistics published by M. Auguste 
Vacquerie. The table of figures was 
called forth by some observations made 
at a meeting of the Union de la Jeunesse 
Republicaine, in the Sorbonne, M. 
Barthou, the speaker in question, re- 
ferred to the envious attacks of several 
persons who endeavoured to make out 
that Victor Hugo was overrate^, and that 
his works were now out of date. M. 
Vacquerie proves by a short sum in addi- 
tion that since 1885, the date of the poet's 
death, the public have paid 7,41 8,368f., or 
^296,730 14s. 5d., for the different edi- 
tions of his works. This gives a rough 
net average of ^"60,000 yearly, a practical 
proof than the literary fame of the author 
of the " Legende des Siecles" is still 
fresh and enduring. It is worth adding 
that the highest prices quoted in M. 
Vacquerie's list were realised by the 






Brown's Book-Staix. 



prose work "I^es Miserables," which was 
issued by two publishers in a cheap form. 
— Pu b lis her 3 s Circular. 



A good readable copy of Victor 
Hugo's most popular novel, "I,es 
Miserables," may be had for od. cash, 
post free, is. 

" The Hunchback of Notre Dame," the 
next in popularity, may also be had at 
the same price. 

A better edition of his works is done 
in cloth, with top edges gilt, at is. nd. 
per volume — cash ; postage, about 4^d. 
fextra. This edition includes — 

Les Miserables. 
Notre Dame. 
k By Order of the King. 

Ninety-Three. 
The Toilers of the Sea. 
•The History of a Crime. 

JAnd maybe had at these prices from A. 
Brown & Co., 77 Union Street, Aber- 
deen. 

Reasonable Prices & Good Work 



W. JQLkY & SONS, 
printers anfc Xitboorapbers, 

23 BR1D(£ 55FJEE5, 

ABERDEEN. 

Office of " Scottish Notes and Queries." 

|An Ecclesiastical History of Scotland, 
from the introduction of Christian- 
ity to the present time. By George 
Grub, 11, D. 4 vols., 8vo. cloth, 
45s. net. This is the standard 
Ecclesiastical History. 

m. BROWN &C0., 77 Union St., Aberdeen. 

Odd Volumes, Scarce Books, and Books 
out of print, sought for and re- 
ported, free of charge, by A. 
BROWN & Co., 77 Union Street, 
Aberdeen. 



fifoy Boobs. 



In our progress through life, as we trundle along, 
Some enliven the road with the snatch of a song ; 
Some sing for their bread, and some dance for their 

pay, 

E'en with sorrowful hearts they must always look 
gay— 

What a pitiful livelihood s that ! 
Some sport away time killing pigeons or rooks, 
Some cultivate turtle, and very good cooks, 
Some are fond of fine figures, of ringlets and looks — 
A fig for them all ! Give me only my books, 
And the rest you can give to the cat ! 

My books are a treasure, more valued by far 
Than jewels protected by bolt and by bar ; 
Companions and counsellors, ready at call, 
They will stand by me still, should I go to the wall, 

And most other pleasures forego. 
For deny to the foxhunter leaping of brooks ; 
Deny to the epicure dinner and cooks ; 
Deny to the fisher his nets, rods, and hooks, 
And deny to me then, Sir, my dearly-loved books, 

And you'll drive me half-crazy with woe. 

There has long been a search for that wonderful stone, 
Which philosophers always have named as their own ; 
By day and by night, both in sunshine and rain, 
It's been searched for, and groped for, and sought for 

in vain, 

No wonder at all, let me say ! 
For though they may search all the rivers and brooks, 
Every corner and cranny, and all sorts of nooks, 
Though they got to their help e'en the aid of old 

Snooks, 
It isn't a stone, Sir, it's nothing but books ! 
This to me is as clear as the day. 

In town or in country, in field or at home, 

Do I ride on the railway o'er sail o'er the foam, 

On the mountain's green breast, or the river's cool side, 

If I wander through forests or lounge by the tide, 

A book is good company still. 
Am I healthy and well ? Do I languish or pine ? 
Reside near the North pole, or live on the line ? 
Are my spirits at rest ? Am I crossed by my love ? 
Commend me to books ! My best doctors they prove — 

Without them all else is but Nil. 

G. G. 
Abekdeen, 1843. 



Pencil Sharpeners have taken a big 
stride towards perfection by the inven- 
tion of the " Cartridge " Pencil Sharp- 
This handv little tool has various 



ener. 




advantages over its predecessors. It 
not only cuts away the wood of the 
pencil, but it sharpens the lead without 
breaking it. The price is one shilling, 
post free, from A. Brown & Co. 



IO 



Brown's Book-Staix. 






CRAIGDAM AND ITS MINISTERS. 

The Rev. WM. BROWN and the Rev. 

PATRICK ROBERTSON. 

By GEOKGE WALKER. 

Second Edition, with Corrections wnd Additions, 
Price 6d. 

" The volume ia brimful of fun, and the stories are told 
with a keen perception and genuine appreciation of their 
worth."— Express. 

''The sketches both of Mr. Brown and of Mr. Robertson 
are distinct and lively. They will give an hour's enjoyment 
to whoever reads them. — Perthshire Constitutional. 



WHAT THINK YK OF CHRIST ?" 

A Sermon by the Rsv. WILLIAM BROWN, Craigdanr 
with Memoir of the Author and Notices of the Rise of 
the Secession in the North of Scotland. By Rev. 
PATRICK ROBERTSON, Craigdam. 6d. 



THE GOOD WIFE AT HOME. 

In Metre, illustrating the Dialect of the North-West 
District of Aberdeenshire. By a Lady. With Glos- 
sary. 3d. 

ABERDONIA. 



Footdee in the Last Century. 
Goodwife at Home." 2d. 



By the Authoress of " The 



THE ROMANTIC SCOTTISH BAL- 
LADS AND THE EADY WARD- 
LAW HERESY. 

By NORVAL CLYNE. 8vo„ sewed. Is. 

ABERDEEN AND ITS FOLK; from 
the 20th to the 50th Year of the 
Present Century. 

By a Son of Bon- Accord. Foolscap 8vo., Cloth, 2s. 6d. 



THE METHODS OF DEBATE. 

By Professor BAIN, LL.D. 6d. 

WORKS OF FICTION : their Use and 
Abuse. 

By Rev. HENRY ANGUS. 6d. 

PROTOPLASM, POWHEADS, POR- 
WIGGLES, AND THE EVOLU- 
TION OF THE HORSE FROM 
THE RHINOCERUS : 

Illustrating Professor Huxley's Scientific Mode of getting 
up the Creation and upsetting Moses. 6d. 



RECORDS OF THE PARISH OF 
ELLON. 

By THOMAS MAIR, Kermuck, Ellon, 5s. 

A. BHOWN & CO,, 

77 UNION STREET, 

Aberdeen. 



WHY NOT 



bind your magazines when it can be 
done 

SO CHEAPLY?' 

Demy, 8vo (9 x 5^ in.) Magazines at is. 
per volume. 

Such are Comhill, Longman's, Temple 
Bar, &c. 

Sup-Royai,, 8vo, (io£ x 6f) at is. 3d. per 
vol. 
This includes Quiver, Chambers' 
Journal, &c. 

Imperial 8vo, (n X 7i) at is. 6d. per 
vol. 
Sunday at Home, Casseli's Family 
Magazine, &c. 

Demy, 4to, (11x9) at 2s. per vol. 
Boy's Own Paper, Punch, &c. 






These prices are for the cheapest 
style, and those who prefer something 
better can have their magazines or books 
bound in any style that suits their fancy 
or their purse. 

MUSIC BINDINGS. 

Folio Quarto Octavo 
14x10. 12x9. 10£x7. 

S. D. S. D. S. D. 

Cloth limp, or stiff, . 3 2 13 
Cloth limp, or stiff, with 

leather back, . . 3 3 2 3 16 
French Morocco limp, or 

half-grained Persian, 

vellum tipped, . . 5 4 4 3 2 6 
Gilt edges additional, . 2 6 2 14 

PORTFOLIOS MADE, 

And all sorts of Plain and Ornamental 
BINDING done by 



A. BROWN & CO. 

J7 UNION STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 






Brown's Book-Staix. 



ii 



"IRobbie JBurns; 




Burns' Anniversary is again upon us 
accompanied, by the usual outburst of 
enthusiasm for the bard and all his 
works, which finds expression at Burns' 
dinners and Burns' concerts. 



What do his admirers think of the 
very candid criticism of his works by the 
editor of the National Observer^. This 
3old critic dares to call The Cotter's 
Satmday Night, "artless twaddling"; 
Scots Wha Hae, "swaggering rant"; 
and To Mary hi Heaven, "cold and 
tedious rhetoric." 



Comparing Burns and Herrick he 
isks, "which is better and more honour- 
able to the artist — (i) to be known to the 
multitude, the mob, the sort of persons 
tvho never read (for they cannot), but 
svho go down to Burns' Club Dinners, 
ind shout in Scots Wha Hae with all the 
trength that Scots drink has lent them ? 
Dr (2) to live chiefly in the minds and 
aearts of them that love literature as an 
ncomparable master, for the sake of the 
3est it was in you to give ?" 



After all, the critic does admit that 
Burns was "the greatest lyrist of his 
:entury, and one of the greatest in all 
iterature." And, as such, his works 
DUght to be bought by everybody. A 
very good edition — edited by W. Scott 



Douglas — can be had for 2s. 8d. We 
have also a nice edition, in limp-leather 
binding, with gilt edges, at 3s. This is 
a marvel of cheapness and ought to be 
seen. 



Carlyle's " Kssay on Burns," gd., post 
free, is. " Carlyle wrote better about 
Burns than he did about anybody 
(saving always the father of Frederick 
the Great.)" 



The student of Burns should also get 
a copy of his life by John Stuart Blackie, 
price gd., post free, is. 

A London bookseller was lately offer- 
ing a MS. poem by Burns for ^38, and a 
letter for ^32. In view of these prices, 
the local collector is to be congratulated 
who bought the MS. of Cauld Kail in 
Aberdeen at the sale of the late Dr. Moir's 
books for little over £9. 

" Brafcsbaw " Culture* 



A story quoted by Vanity Fah anent 
the Bishop of Oxford will bear repeti- 
tion. Dr. Stubbs was addressing an 
audience of Reading High School girls 
on the occasion of their prize distribu- 
tion, and expressed his regret that he no 
longer had leisure to devote to general 
literature. 

" Indeed, my dear young friends," the 
prelate continued, " there is but one 
book which I find time to dip into at all. 
Its name begins with a B ; perhaps you 
can guess at the title." 

" Bible," volubly exclaimed half the 
school, seeing only the Bishop, and not 
knowing the man. 

" No ; Bradshaw," came the solemn 
correction, whereupon the girls blushed 
in a body, and Dr. Stubbs smiled his own 
characteristic smile. 



Judsoris Patent Gummer is a great 
improvement on the old gum pots. It 
is always clean, always ready, and no 
brush is required. It is made in two 
sizes, 6d. and is. ; postage, 3d. extra. 

A. Brown & Co., 77 Union St., Aberdeen. 



i2 Brown's Book-Stall. 



Barnes Stqpben & Sons. 



PICTURE FRAME DEPARTMENT. 

As we have now the largest and most Extensive Premises in Scotland, Customers! 
may rely on getting all their Orders carefully and promptly executed. We have* 
always on hand a large variety of 

eTTOlGS, 6I2GRAYinG$, OIL PAinTinGS, UJSTGR COLOURS, 
OLGOGRSPES, ADD (JfiROmOS. 

Pictures of every description framed. Hundreds of Patterns of Moulding*, 
to select from. Speciality in CUT-OUT MOUNTS. 

Drawings and Photographs Mounted in Plain or Cut-Out Mounts. 

B<?st £i$Iisl? Qold ^ra/T)<?s for Oil paiQtir;§5, -*• ■*■ * 

^ * * U/ater Colours, ^i^raviij^s, photographs, 9e 

MIRROR FRAMES RE-GILT; OLD FRAMES RE- GILT; EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF GILDING WORK DONE. 



PICTURE RODS FITTED UP AND PICTURES HUNG 



»♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦•♦e» »♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦ ♦♦♦**♦♦♦. 



JAMES STEPHEN & SONS, 

fllMrror anb picture jframe flfcanufacturers 

FINE ART PUBLISHERS, ARTISTS, COLORMEN, &c, 

48, 49, AND 50 WOOLMANHILL, 



(Opposite Entrance Gate to Royal Infirmary.) 



WORKS-RODGER'S WAEK, JOHN STREET. 

TELEPHONE— No. 553. 



FOR 

MILLINERY, 

MANTLES, 

and DRESSES 

VISIT 

ROBERT HENDERSON'S 

General £)raper£ Warehouse, 

<x\ 33 *P 35 UNION STREET, IX> 
Aberdeen, 



WE PRINT 



Your Address on 120 

Sheets of Smooth Parch- 

*; ^* A ^ f A ment JNotepaper, the same 

as the sample enclosed with this dumber of 

BROWN'S BOOK-STALL, and 

supply 100 Envelopes to 

Match, all 



For 2/2. 



I^-A^IKIE .A. NOTE OIF TKIS. 



A. BROWN & CO., 77 UNION STBEET, ABERDEEN. 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET >^ i RKKT 

f » 
ABEltDEl %» 



The BON-ACCORD SHIRT, 



All sizes, extra Width of Front, 



EVENING DRESS. 



5 PER CENT. DISCOUNT 

FOR CASH. 


BEAVER, MEI/TON, 
VICUNA 

Overcoatings, 

NEWEST SHADES. 

A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



SPECIAL 

IDress Suits, 
£3 4s. 

5 Per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



Gentlemen's Mufflers 



AND 



Silk Handkerchiefs, i 



A. S. COOK, 



,6 MARKET STREET, 



ABERDEEN. 



The BON-ACCORD SHIRT 



Evening Dross, 



5s., 68., 7s. 6d., & 8s. 6d. 






A. S. COOK, J specialty. 

26 MARKET STREET 1$, 4U tf}C £ 



ABERDEEN. 



COLLARS, 
CUFFS, 

AND 

HOSIERY. 



E)ress Suit 

. £4 10s. 



5 Per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



To Cash Purchasers. 



HIGHLAND CLOAKS 



AND 



ULSTERS, 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 




No. 2. 



FEBRUARY. 



1892. 



(lorn Bfiiisl and fllercaife Insurance 

IN WHICH IS NOW MERGED 

THE SCOTTISH PROVINCIAL ASSURANCE CO. 




FIRE, LIFE, AND ANNUITIES. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter and Special Acts of Parliament. 
Total Assets exceed £10,000 ,000. 

The Funds of the Life Department are not liable for obligations under the Fire 
Department, nor are the Funds of the Fire Department liable for obligations under the 
Life Department. In this Company, therefore, the Investments for the Life Depart- 
ment are kept entirely separate from those of the Fire Department, as set forth in the 
Balance Sheet. 



Income for 1890, 



£2,487,839. 



GEORGE COLLIE, Esq., Advocate. , WILLIAM YEATS, Esq. of Auquhakney. 

JAMES F. LUMSDEN, Esq., Advocate. JOHN WHYTE, Esq., Advocate. 

ALEX. M. OGSTON, Esq. of Akdoe. JOHN COOK, Esq., Banker. 

Local Manager— GEORGE W. W. BARCLAY. 
Fire Superintendent— J). B. MILNE. 



Prospectuses and full information as to several important features recently introduced can be 
obtained at the Chief Offices, Branches, and Agencies. 

CHIEF OFFICES : 

Edinburgh— 64 Princes Street ; London— 6i Threadneedle Street, B.C. 

Aberdeen Office : 91 UNION STREET, 



Seeds of Superlative Quality 



AT 



GBRDNQ & DARLING'S 

11 Bridge Street, 

ABERDEEN. 






By Special Appointment Patronised b/ 




BOM CUP SALOONS. 



To The Queen. 




H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 



JOHN FORD & CO., 

QLA55 AND GHINA JMERCHANTS, 
136 & 138 UNION STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 



Also, at 39 Princes Street, and Holyrood Glass Works, 

EDINBURGH. 




No. 2. 



FEBRUARY 



1892 



Brown's Bberfceen !JBoofe*5talL 



No. II. 



ifter 



NDRBWSHIRRBFS, a bookseller 
in the city at this time, in a rhym- 
ing "Shop Bill," has so graphi- 
ally described his stock that it may be 
sferred to as a fair sample of what was 
onsidered necessary. It is too long to 
uote entire ; but that other articles than 
ooks were kept he instances ; — 

Imprimis, German flutes and misic, 
Variety of books on physic, 
All kinds of Classics, Homer's Iliad, 
Sermons, Plays, and Balm of Gilead, 
Songs, Bibles, Psalm-Books. and the like, 
As mony as would big a dyke. 

a clever and whimsical cbmbina- 
on of books in amusing juxtaposition, 
e ends with : 

Scales, compasses, and ith?r trocks, 
Fit only for your learned folks ; 
With mony mair, a strange convention, 
Too tedious just now to mention. 

Spite of the literary atmosphere which 
roduced poetical booksellers like Shir- 
efs, and in which Drs. Beattie, Camp- 
ell, Gerard, and Professor Copland 
ved, and Francis Peacock moved, the 
ew productions of the day did not 
affice to occupy the time of the book- 
ellers. They had, therefore, to deal in 
ld|or second-hand books; and Mr. Brown 
ealt so extensively in these that he 
uite struck out a general overturn of 
le books and activity in the trade, 
business was indeed in a very sleepy state 



in the place. Hurry and bustle were 
quite unknown. At the close of the day 
a merchant in the Rotten Row, close to 
the Town-House, leaning over his half- 
closed door, would ask his neighbour 
across the street — " What ha'e you done 
the day, John ? " to which John would 
reply — " Oh, nae that ill ; I've drawn 
fifteenpence." And often, on the heads 
of that, they would close their shops, 
adjourn either to the New Inn, or to a 
quiet, cosy " howff," afterwards known 
as the " L,emon Tree," and spend their 
day's drawings — perhaps more. 

Old books are the test of a bookseller's 
knowledge of literature. New ones may 
be sold by the hundredweight or the 
bushel, according to their spicy appear- 
ance ; and a present-day bookseller may, 
in many cases, be as well selling Bath- 
bricks for any knowledge he has of the 
books. The name " old books " is often 
a misnomer, for are there not books 
which can never be termed, or can never 
grow, old ? They came with, and they 
have retained, the freshness of the morn- 
ing dew ; and is there not something in 
having them in the very form which the 
author designed ? To the student grop- 
ing in the dark of his winter discontent 
they are as welcome as the dawn of the 
day or the breath of spring. 

Age cannot wither nor custom stale 
Their infinite variety. 

Shakespeare, " young, guid aul' Shakes- 
peare," as Shirrefs calls him, may now be 
got for one shilling ; but the 1632 folio 
brings hundreds of pounds, and in those 



H 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



m* 



^*<-* 



THE 



? 



^behdeen Quill Company's 

Business is now the Property of 

GEORGE WATERSTON & SONS, 

Sealing Wax Makers & Stationers, 

56 HANOVER STREET, 

EDINBURGH. 



The Manufactory is still carried on by Aber- 
deen work-people removed to Edinburgh at the 
time the business was transferred. 



All who use Quill or Steel Pens who look to ex- 
cellence and style in their 

UJRICinG mflCGRISLS 

Should use the 

impemaL PAiwBmenT 
nocepapGR, 

Which is a Specialty of the above firm, and is to be 
had from all 

ABERDEEN BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS. 



Brown's Book-Staix. 



15 



days copies might have been, and were, 
picked up for a trifle. And no matter 
in what " questionable form " they came, 
whether in the shape of stately, ponder- 
ous folios — the delight of Charles I^amb 
— a Baskerville quarto, or a duodecimo 
Elzevir, so prized by collectors ; whether 
1 they came from the press of a German 
I Gutenberg, an English Caxton, the 
Scotch " immaculate " Foulis, or our own 
Aberdeen Raban, they were always 
valuable ; and if the bookseller were not 
himself a bibliomaniac, could be turned 
into hard cash for his own sustentation 
fund, the extension of his business, 
or the gratification of an intelligent cus- 
tomer. Sometimes, indeed, none of these 
inducements could tempt him. A cer- 
tain bookseller, having issued a cata- 
logue of recently-acquired stock, which 
he had not had time to thoroughly 
examine, was waited upon by a stranger 
who said that if still unsold, he would 

take No. at the price quoted. The 

bookseller got his steps, ascended to the 
highest shelf, took out the volume, 
looked at the title-page and colophon, 
saw that it was complete, put it into his 
pocket, descended, and, sternly address- 
ing his would-be customer, said : " Sir, 
if you think that I would part with that 
volume at any price you might offer, you 
are greatly mistaken. I bought it for 
my own use." 

So Mr. Brown, seeing the good field he 
had, entered the happy hunting-ground 
with much enthusiasm and with great 
tact, buying " old books" in. parcels or 
in whole libraries, and undertaking to 
auction them on commission. No doubt 
he had to learn by experience ; for Mr 
Knight's business was a quiet-going con- 
cern compared with what Mr. Brown 
aimed at. He could not certainly have 
adopted any better plan for speedily 
acquiring that knowledge which he ulti- 
mately possessed of the mercantile value 
of books, as well as of their contents and 
authorship. 

Of course, he supplied all other re- 
quisites necessary for literary men. First 
and most notable was, we should say, 
"the grey goose quill," so superior to 



the painter's brush, which can only de- 
pect the lark as a material subject, while 
the pen can give the very trill of the 
lark's song. That must have been the 
way in which Dempster, "The Scottish 
Vocalist," acquired his great gift of song, 
and made his fortune, for Dempster be- 
gan life as a quill manufacturer on Gil- 
comston Brae, passing the business, on 
his retirement, to Duncan in Crown 
Court, to whom the tuneful Gordon (long 
first violinist in the Catholic Church 
choir) succeeded, carrying on the busi- 
ness in the " elegant " Queen Street. 
And on his death Aberdeen lost the 
credit and renown of having the largest 
quill manufactory in the world, by 
Waterston, of Edinburgh, buying the 
business and goodwill, and worthily re- 
taining in Edinburgh its prestige, let us 
note. But we in Aberdeen may well ask 
— What has become of the old familiar 
grey goose quill ? Do the degenerate 
geese of the present day produce it, or 
are they trained now to grow steel pens ? 
Has any one, under twenty years of age, 
ever seen a quill in actual use ? There 
are floating traditions in some Govern- 
ment offices of its existence in some re- 
mote sanctum, like traditions regarding 
the Great Auk ; but it is never seen, and 
only heard of by reading the estimates, 
which show a good round sum given to 
provide its continuance. That always 
ensures a long life, though it may be an 
invisible one. But when it was not only 
visible but in common use, big officials 
— like our celebrated Carnegie, who "had 
been Town Clerk of Aberdeen ever since 
his father dee'd " — never used a quill 
twice. That he or Government officials 
should have to waste their precious time 
in mending a pen was considered a waste 
of Her Majesty's stores of time ; and so 
up to the year i860, if not to the present 
day, those second-hand pens were sold 
all over England, and, being the very 
best that could be got, were largely 
purchased. 

In consequence of the large and regular 
trade which Aberdeen had with the 
Baltic, exporting stockings, wool, and 
yarn, and importing in return timber, 



16 



Brown's Book-Stau,. 



"A MOST USEFUL. AND INGENIOUS NQVEkTY." 

The Old Desk-Rack and Book-Slide superseded. 

W ALKE R'S 

H DJUSTABLE jg QQK TRACK, 

FOR OFFICE AND HOME USE. 
Can be used in 

the OFFICE, 

the STUDY , 

the WAREHOUSE, 

the SHOW-ROOM, 

the LIBRARY, 

the DRAWING-HOOlVIJ^fec,, &c. 





ADJUSTABLE !— The Partitions can be moved in- 
stantly, to make the divisions any required size. 

SIMPLE 8 — Nothing to get out of order. 

STRONG ! — Will hold upright any size of Book. 



Extra Partitions supplied 

at 

Threepence each. 



Showing- it adjusted for Book 3 of Reference. 

SIZES. — The following sizes always in stock. Any other length (above 12 inches) to 

order at proportionate price. 



No. 


Width. 


Length. 


Number of Partitions. 


Price. 


No. 1. 


6 Inches. 


12 Inches. 


8 Partitions. 


3s. 6d. 


No. 2. 


6 „ 


15 




]2 „ 


5s. Od. 


No. 3. 


fi 


18 




14 „ 


6s. Od. 


No. 4. 


6 „ 


21 




16 


7s. Od. 


No. 5. 


6 ., 


24 




18 „ 


8s. Od. 


No. 6. 


6 „ 


30 




23 


10s. Od. 


No. 7. 


6 „ 


36 


» 


27 


12s. 6d. 



Sold by all Booksellers and Stationers. 



Brown's Book-Stau,. 



17 



flax, and quills, Aberdeen-manufactured 
quills were famous. But the manufac- 
ture is now extinct. Like the poor wifie 
who, on the introduction of gas, and the 
consequent decrease in the demand for 
oil, in pity asked — " Fat would come o' 
the peer whaals noo ? " one is tempted to 
pity the geese ; for, without the annual 
plucking, life must become very mono- 
tonous to them. The wailing cry, " Is 
life worth living?" heard so much of some 
time ago, can only have been originated 
by the unplucked geese ; and it shows 
that education has been really brought 
down to the meanest capacity when that 
cry found its way into the newspaper press. 

Mr. Brown would also sell wafers for 
the commonalty, and sealing wax for the 
nobility and gentry and advocates in the 
Gallowgate. Here again a question 
arises — Has any young person ever seen 
a wafer, or knows what it is ? Wafers 
and quills ought to have been shown in 
the Industrial Exhibition, and specimens 
secured for the proposed Antiquarian 
Museum before they become obsolete. 

Of course, ink was requisite ; and then 
it was supplied by the cask from some 
native intelligent druggist, or, as we 
should now call him, a chemist. The 
selling of it was a black business for 
booksellers' assistants who wished to 
-preserve their white hands, while others 
contrived to save black gloves by dab- 
bling in it. Not till half-a-century after 
did Morrison, of Perth, taking advantage 
of the cheapness of stoneware and glass 
bottles, make its manufacture a specialty 
and a fortune for himself. 

He sold paper also, which, in those 
good, old-fashioned days, was indeed 
paper, and not, as so much of it is at 
present, a film of cotton or jute, plastered 
over with pipe-clay. It was good, honest 
hand-made paper, which would have 
satisfied even Mr Ruskin. It was kept 
in two sizes — post, for ordinary corre- 
spondence ; and foolscap, for writers of 
accounts, Gallowgate advocates, Govern- 
ment officials, and those who wished to 
save double postage ; for, with torment- 
ing ingenuity to torture, the authorities 
charged single postage for every slip of 



paper enclosed. So excessively stupid 
were the then restrictions on correspond- 
ence that it is a wonder they did not 
attempt to prohibit the use of ink itself, 
or at least tax it heavily. Account-books 
of native manufacture were unruled. If 
money columns were required they were 
added by the bookseller's assistant. If 
blue-lined the books had to be got from 
Edinburgh. How Mr. Brown fretted over 
this, and got it remedied, will, as Clerk 
Spalding would say, be seen afterwards. 
Long before 1785 the Hornbooks, those 
manuals of education from which children 
learnt their letters, had died out, like the 
Dodo ; in the process of evolution their 
place was filled by the Shorter Catechism 
— that manual which, " along with a little 
oatmeal," has made Scotchmen a nation 
of metaphysicians, with a school of its 
own amongst philosophical systems. 
Every aspiring bookseller had an edition 
of his own, in which rudimentary lessons 
were printed ; and this, along with a 
Bible, was supposed to contain the neces- 
sary material for carrying a scholar 
through all the six standards. A poli- 
tician of no mean celebrity, driven to his 
wit's-end lately to find a passable excuse 
for opening a bazaar, facetiously gave 
credit to the modern bazaar for develop- 
ing the shrewdness of Scotchmen and 
so ensuring their success abroad. If this 
were of modern growth we should hear 
less of it. It comes entirely from the 
Shorter Catechism ! No wonder though 
wicked boys rebel against it. Some years 
since the principal of A. Brown & Co. 
was standing conversing with a minister, 
when a farmer boy came bouncing into 
the shop bawling out, " Hae you 'Jack 
Shepherd?'" " No, my boy," said the 
principal; "but we have some nice 
Shorter Catechisms, much better than 
'Jack Shepherd.' " " Lat's see them ;" 
and, directions being given to an 
assistant to bring them, their real nature 
suddenly dawned on the rustic intelli- 
gence, and he exclaimed, " Na, na ; 
gweedsake ! we get owre muckle o' that 
at hame." And off he bolted, on the 
direct road to the Reformatory, It was a 
case of trying to gild the philosophic pill. 



i8 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



T^S£Y^fcA^5£\^^^ 



ENGLISH MANUFACTURES. 



TO CONSUMERS OF 

OFFICE AJMD DR/iWIJMQ PENCILS. I 

Use only Pencils of ENGLISH MANUFACTURE. They are 
superior in every respect to those of Foreign make. 



BANK OP ENGLAND 

PURE CUMBERLAND LEAD 

SPANIS H~~GRA PHITE 
TOUGHENED LEAD 

FOR DRAUGHTSMEN 



PENCILS 



ARE SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED. THEY ARE MADE BY 

SKILLED WORKMEN. 
EXTRA VALUE AND QUALITY GUARANTEED. 



E. WOLFF & SON, 

Manufacturers to Her Majesty's Government & the Bank of England, 

STEAM PENCIL WORKS, 
BATTERSEA, LONDON, S.W, 



Brown's Book-Stau,. 



19 




Hlqranfcer ^Srown, 

PROVOST OF ABERDEEN, 1822-3 and 1826-7, 
From a Miniature by A. Robertson, about 1823, 



20 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



" The Concise Dictionary stands first— and by a long interval — among all 
the one-volume English Dictionaries." — The Academy. 



Just published. In One Volume, 864 pages, fcap. 4to, containing over 
80,000 entries, cloth, 5s. 

NEW AND CHEAPER EDITION, 

WITH EXTENSIVE SUPPLEMENT AND VALUABLE APPENDICES. 

A CONCISE DICTIONARY 

OF THE 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

ETYMOLOGICAL AND PRONOUNCING, LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC, AND TECHNICAL. 

By CHARLES A2THANDALE, M.A., LL.D., 

Editor of Ogilvie's "Imperial Dictionary,*' New Edition; Blackie's 
" Modern Cyclopedia," &c. 



A NNANDALE'S CONCISE DICTIONARY has, since its first publication, held a 
H. pre-eminent place among one-volume English Dictionaries. It is now issued, in 
^ an extended form, at the low price of 5s., and is thus brought within the reach of 
everyboby. 



On the etymology such an amount of 
care has been bestowed as the great import- 
ance of the subject demands, the whole of 
the most recent investigators having been 
consulted and taken advantage of. 

The correct pronunciation of the words 
is shown on an exceedingly simple system, 
the key-words for the different sounds be- 
ing given at the foot of each page. 

Pronouncing Lists of ancientand modern 
biographical and geographical names, and 
lists of foreign words and phrases, abbrevi- 
ations, &c, are given by way of appendix. 

The New Edition is augmented by Thirty-two pages of matter, containing the 
following additions : — (1) Supplement of Additional Words and Terms. (2) Key to Noted 
Names i?i Fiction, Mythology, &c. (3) List of Authors, with Dates of Birth and Death. 
(4) Form of Address to Persons of Rank and Title. (5) Money Syste?ns of the Countries of 
the World. 

The CONCISE DICTIONARY is published in three styles of Binding : 
Cloth, red edges, 5s. | Half-bound Roxburghe, 6s.6d. 



It gives full and intelligible explanations, 
with the correct pronunciation, and really 
trustworthy etymology, of all English 
words in current use. It contains more 
matter than any dictionary of similar price, 
is admirably printed, and handy in size. 

While the general Vocabulary included 
in it is very ample, both as regards simple 
words and compounds, one of its chief aims 
is to explain clearly and accurately all im- 
portant modern terms pertaining to 
science, technology and the arts, since it 
is these terms that lead the great majority 
of readers most frequently to consult the 
dictionary. 



Half-morocco, 



9s. 



BLACKIE & SON, Limited, London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Dublin, 



A. LIST OF 

BOOKS, OLD AND NEW, 

OFFERED VERY CHEAP BY 

A. BROWN & CO., 77 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 

Sculptured Stones of Scotland. Coloured plates, 2 vols., folio, good copy. £17 

Volume I. is extremely scarce. 
Spalding Club (New) Books. Yols. 1 to 6, as new. £6 10s 
Kennedy's Annals of Aberdeen. 2 vols., 4to, nice copy, half-calf. 35s 1818 



Aberdeen and its Folk from the 20th to the 50th Year of the Present Century. 12mo, 

cloth. 2s 6d 1868 

Aberdeen Literature Forty- Five Years Ago. By John Hill Burton, Joseph Robertson, &c. 

Crown 8vo, boards. 2s 1878 

Aberdeenshire Lintie. Nice copy, 8vo, cloth. 7s 6d 1854 

A Garland of Bon- Accord. Crown 8vo, half-bound. 10s 6d Aberdeen, 1886 

"Curious and disgusting." 

Aiken (Anna Lsetitia). Poems. Post 8vo, calf. Is 1774 

Aitken (D. S.). Maximus in Minimis ; or, Sketches and Poems. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 

Aberdeen, 1890 
Alexander (J.). The Jews: their Past, Present, and Future. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 1870 
Alirabi ; or, the Banks and Bankers of the Nile. 8vo, cloth, stamp on title. 2s 1883 

Anderson (J.). The Black Book of Kincardineshire. Crown 8vo, cloth. 4s 6d 1843 

(W). Rhymes, Reveries, and Reminiscences. Crown 8vo, half-morocco. 5s 1851 

Angus (J.). Christ our Life. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 1853 

B. (C. L.). Songs of a Caged Bird. Post 8vo, half -calf, privately printed. 5s N.D. 

Ballad Minstrelsy of Scotland. Crown 8vo, cloth. 5s Glasgow, 1871 

Balzac (Pere Goriot). 6 Etchings. Large 8vo, boards. (Published 10s 6d) 6s 1887 

Bancroft (Mr. and Mrs.), On and Off the Stage. By Themselves. 1st edition, 2 vols., 8vo, 

cloth, portraits. 7s 6d 1888 

Barclay (W.). Callirhoe ; or, the Well of Spa. 12mo, sewed. 2s 1799 

Barker (Joseph). Life. By Himself. 8vo, cloth. Is 6d 1880 

Barrow's Tour on the Continent, 1852; Forester's Rambles in Norway, 1855; Brook's 

Russians of the South, 1854. In 1 vol., crown 8vo, half-calf, neat. 2s V.Y. 

Beith's Memories of Disruption Times. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1877 

Bewick (Thomas), and his Pupils. By Austin Dobson. With 95 illustrations, 8vo, cloth. 

7s 6d 1884 

Blackie (J. Stuart). Language and Literature of the Scottish Highlands. Crown 8vo, 

cloth. 4s. 1876 

Bonar (Horatius). The Rent Veil. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 6d 1875 

Words Old and New. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1866 

Boyd (A. K. H.). Graver Thoughts of a Country Parson, 3rd series, crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 
Brassey's Storm and Sunshine in the East. 100 illustrations, 8vo, cloth, new. (Published 21s), 

12s. 1880 

Bridge's Exposition of Psalm cxix. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 6d 1845 

Bruce's Lives of Eminent Men of Aberdeen. Crown 8vo, cloth. 5s 1841 

Buchan's Account of the Family of Keith. Front., post 8vo, boards, uncut. 12s 6d 1820 

Bulloch (J. M.). The Lord Rectors of the Universities of Aberdeen. Crown 8vo, sewed. 2s 



Brown's Book-Stau,. 



Burton (John Hill). The Book Hunter. Crown 8vo, half -morocco, 6s 1885 

Cadenhead (George). The Family of Cadenhead. 8vo, half-bound. 5s 1887 

Territorial History of the Burgh of Aberdeen. 8vo. Is 1876 

(Wm.). Flights of Fancy. Crown 8vo, cloth. 4s 1853 

Calverley (Charles S.). Literary Remains of, with Memoir and Portrait. 8vo, cloth. 7s 6d 
Campbell (John). Poems (in Gaelic). Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1884 

Carnie (W.). Waifs of Rhyme. 16mo, cloth. Is 6d 1890 

Carrol (Lewis). Rhyme? and Reason? Illustrated, 1st edition, scarce, crown 8vo, cloth. 

8s 6d 1883 

Cary (H. F., Translator of Dante). Memoir by His Son. Library stamp on portrait, 2 vols., 

crown 8vo, cloth. 3s 1847 

Chalmers (Thomas). Life. By Rev. R. L. Walker. Crown 8vo, cloth. 9d 1880 

Clavers. The Despot's Champion ; a Scot's Biography. By a Southern. 8vo, cloth. 6s 1889 
Cleveland's Memoirs of Pitt. Portrait, 24mo. 6d 1839 

Cowley's Essays and Bacon's Wisdom of the Ancients. 12mo, cloth. Is N.D. 

Davidson (G.). The Legend of St. Swithin. Illustrations by John Faed. 8vo, boards. 2s N.D. 
Defoe's Account of the Pirate Gow. Only 220 printed. 8vo, boards, scarce. 6s 1890 

Dickens' Bleak House. First edition, illustrated by H. K. Browne, some of the plates spotted, 

8vo, half-morocco. 15s 1853 

Douglas (F.). Description of the East Coast of Scotland. 8vo, half-morocco, neat. 6s 1826 
Duncan's Transformations of Insects. 8vo, cloth. 2s 6d N.D. 

Edwards on the Freedom of the Will. 8vo, calf. Is 3d 1816 

Essays on Social Subjects from the Saturday Review. 8vo, cloth. 3s 6d 1864 

Euphemia and Salem : a Poem. 18mo, cloth. Is 6d 1863 

No collector of Aberdeen books should be without a copy of this book. 
Fletcher (Mrs.). Autobiography. Portrait, 8vo, cloth. 4s 1875 

Glory or Gravity, wherein the Objects of the Christian Faith are Exhibited, 8vo, calf. Is 1733 
Gordon's Chronicles of Keith, &c. 8vo, cloth. 5s 1880 

Grant (F. W.). Numerical Structure of Scripture. Crown 8vo, sewed. Is New York, 1887 
Gray (Lady Jane). Life, Character, and Death of this Most Illustrious Pattern of Female 

Vertue. Post 8vo, sewed. Is 1714 

Hamilton's Memoirs of the Count de Grammont, with 17 Etchings and 34 Portraits of Court 

Beauties, &c, 2 vols., royal 8vo, cloth. 24s 1889 

Hamley's National Defence. Stamp on title, 8vo, cloth. Is 6d 1889 

Harper (Principal). Life. By Dr. Thomson. 8vo, cloth. 5s 1881 

Henderson (J. A.). History of the Parish of Banchory-Devenick. Illustrated, 4to, buckram. 

10s 6d 1890 

Henry (Matthew). Exposition of Old and New Testaments. 5 vols., 4to, calf. 10s 1808 
History of the Reformation in Scotland. Crown 8vo, half-bound. 6s Aberdeen, 1887 

Halloa ! A Local Magazine. Nos. 1 to 4, all published, neatly half- bound, scarce. 3s 

Do. Unbound. 2s 

Hubert (P. G.). Liberty and a Living : an Attempt to Secure Bread and Butter, Sunshine 

and Content. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 3d 1890 

Hughes' Australian Colonies, 1852 ; Cornwall, its Mines and Miners, 1855. In 1 vol., half- 
calf, neat. 3s 1855 
Hunter's Missions in India and Africa. Crown 8vo, cloth. 6d 1873 
Jolly (Wm.). Life of John Duncan, Scotch Weaver and Botanist. Portrait, 8vo, cloth. 

(Published 9s), 3s 6d 1883 

Kidd (John Simpson). Autobiographic Reminiscences. Small 4to, cloth, scarce and interesting, 

privately printed. 3s 6d Aberdeen, 1874 

Kitto's History of Palestine. 200 illustrations, 8vo, cloth. 2s 1853 

Knight (W.). Auld Yule, and other Poems. Post 8vo, cloth. 2s 6d 1869 



Brown's Book-Staix. 



Landels' Young- Man in the Battle of Life. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s N.D. 

True Glory of Woman. Crown 8 vo, cloth. Is 9d N.D. 

Leach (A.). The Quadrangle by Moonlight. 8vo, sewed. Is 1879 

Local Humbugs ; or, Studies in Social Ethics. By the Baron of Leys. 8vo, sewed. Is 

Aberdeen, 1884 
Longmuir (J.). Speyside. Plates and maps, crown 8vo, cloth, scarce, 7s 6d 1860 

Lumsden (D. W.). Memorials of the Families of Lumsdaine, Lumisden, or Lumsden. Illustra- 
tions, 4to, half -morocco, only 80 copies printed. 42s 1889 
Mair (Thomas). Records of the Parish of Ellon, 8vo, cloth. 5s 1876 
Mann (Leigh). Life Problems Answered in Christ. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1870 
Marshall's Historic Scenes in Perthshire. Small 4to. 5s 6d 1880 
Manndeville's Travailes. Edited by Halliwell. 8vo, cloth. 7s 6d 1869 
Meldrum (R.). Light on Dark Paths. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 1883 
Michie (J. G.). The History of Loch Kinnord. Crown 8vo, boards. Is 6d 
Monday (A. J.). From the Tone of Somersetshire to the Don of Aberdeenshire. Crown 8vo, 
cloth. 4s 1886 
Morgan (Patrick). Annals of Woodside and Newhills, Historical and Genealogical. 26 illus- 
trations and map, large 8vo, cloth. 10s 6d 1886 

A most interesting book to the local antiquary. 

Munro (Alex. M.). The Common Good of the City of Aberdeen, 1319-1887. Post 8vo, 

boards. 1 s 6d 1 888 

M'Connachie (A. I.). Lochnagar. Illustrations, 8vo, sewed. Is, or cloth, 2s 1891 

Macgillivray's Molluscous Animals of Scotland. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 6d 1844 

Macgregor (A.). Life of Flora Macdonald, and her Adventures with Prince Charles. 8vo, 

cloth. 2s 6d 1882 

Mackenzie's History of the Camerons. 8vo, half -bound. (Published 30s), 20s 1884 

Macintosh (John, LL.D., Aberdeen). Scotland from the Earliest Times to the Present Century. 

Illustrations, 8vo, cloth. 4s 1890 

Nature, 1883-1886. 6 vols., cloth. 2s each 

Nicholson and Muir's County Council Guide for Scotland. 8vo, cloth. 4s 1889 

Nisbet's Songs of the Temple Pilgrims. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1863 

Northern Iris, The. Nos. 1-4 (all published), half -coloured morocco, uncut, gilt top (covers 

bound in), scarce. 10s 6d " 1826 

Ogilvie (G.). Early Progress of Christianity in Buchan. Small 4to, boards. Is 6d 
Orem's Description of Old Aberdeen. Frontispiece, crown 8vo, cloth, nice copy. 12s 6d 1830 
Paul (Wm.). Past and Present of Aberdeenshire. Portrait, crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 6d 1 881 

Notes on the Early History of the Brig of Balgownie. 8vo, boards. 4s 6d 1876 

Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry. 3 vols., 8vo. 13s 6d 1876 

Percy (Stephen). Robin Hood and his Merry Foresters. Coloured illustrations, crown 8vo, 

cloth. Is 6d 1850 

Pouchet. The Universe ; or, the Infinitely Little and the Infinitely Great. ,270 illustrations, 

8vo, cloth. 5s 6d 1882 

Pratt's Buchan. Plates, 1st edition, crown 8vo, cloth. 15s 1858 

Pratt (Mrs. J. B.). Glen Tilloch ; a Tale. Post 8vo, cloth. Is 1845 

Ramsay (Sir George). The Moralist and Politician. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is 1865 

Rettie's Aberdeen Fifty Years Ago. Illustrations, 8vo, boards. 4s 1868 

Rivers (T. T.). The Orchard House. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 6d 1879 

Robertson (Joseph). Scottish Abbeys and Cathedrals. Large paper, only 50 copies printed, 

8vo, cloth. 7s 6d 1891 

Book of Bon- Accord. Plates, crown 8vo, cloth. 15s 1839 

(J. A.). Comitatus de Atholia. The Earldom of Atholl. Map, &c, 8vo, cloth, 

privately printed. 10s 6d 1860 



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Robson (J.). The Bible; its Revelation, Inspiration, and Evidence. 8vo, cloth. 6s 1883 
Ross (J. A.). Municipal Affairs in Aberdeen since 1833. 8vo, cloth 1889 

Saxby (H. L.). The Birds of Shetland. Tinted plates, 8vo, cloth. 18s 6d 1874 

Schlegel's Dramatic Art and Literature. Crown 8vo, cloth, 2 vols. 2s 1840 

Schwab (C). Practical Guide to Ascertain the Age of the Horse. 20 coloured plates, 12mo, 

cloth. 2s NJD. 

Shakespeare's Historical Plays. Edited by Bishop Wordsworth. 3 vols., 8vo, cloth, stamp on 

title 7s 6d ^ 1883 

Shirrefs (Andrew). Poems ; Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. Wants portrait, 8vo, half- 
morocco. 3s 6d 1790 

Another Copy. Half-calf. 5s 1790 

Smiles (S.). Robert Dick, Baker, of Thurso, Geologist and Botanist. Etched portrait and 

numerous illustrations, 8vo, cloth. (Published 12s), 4s 1878 

Smith (John). Memoir of John Milne (Founder of the Milne Bequest). Portrait, crown 8vo, 

cloth. Is 1871 

Somerset (Duke of). Christian Theology and Modern Scepticism. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1872 
Stephen (J.). On Epistle to the Romans. Post 8vo, cloth. Is Aberdeen, 1857 

Stewart (A.). Gaelic Grammar. Crown 8vo, cloth. 3s 1886 

Stowall (W. H.). History of the Puritans in England. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 
Sutherland (G.). Outlines of Scottish Archseology. Illustrated, sewed. Is 1870 

Taine's Notes on England. 8vo, cloth. 3s 6d 1872 

[Taylor (Isaac).] Fanaticism. 8vo, half-calf. 5s 6d 1833 

The Book of Psalms in Verse. By the Marquis of Lome. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 6d 1877 
Thomson on the Grape Vine. 8vo, cloth. 2s 6d 1879 

Fruit Culture under Glass. 8vo, cloth. 3s 6d 1881 

Martyr Graves of Scotland. Second series, crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1877 

Tracts by a Layman. Crown 8vo, cloth. Is Aberdeen, 1866 

Trollope (A.). Orley Farm. Illustrated by Millais, first edition, 2 vols., 8vo, half-calf. 7s 6d 

1862 
Turreff's Antiquarian Gleanings. Crown 8vo, cloth. 3s 6d 1871 

Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation. 12mo, sewed. 6d 1850 

Walford's Men of the Time. Thick 8vo, half-bound. 3s 6d 1862 

Walker (A.). Mary Queen of Scots : a Narrative and Defence. Portraits and 8 illustrations, 

8vo, vellum. 7s 6d 1889 

Disblair, 1634-1884. 13 illustrations, small folio, cloth 1884 

History of the Workhouse in Aberdeen. Small folio, boards. 3s 6d 1885 

On Some Church Relics Shewn at the Seabury Centenary Meeting. Small folio, 

boards. 3s 6d 1884 
Robert Gordon, 1665-1731; His Hospital, 1750-1876; His College, 1880. 8vo, 

cloth. 4s 6d 1886 

Wal pole's Anecdotes of Painting in England. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 6d 1871 

Warburton's Hochelaga. Crown 8vo, boards. Is 1855 

Watt (R.). The Newer Criticism and the Analogy of the Faith. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2s 1881 
Wicks (Mark). Organ Building for Amateurs. 200 illustrations, 8vo, cloth. 2s 1887 

Willy am's History of Waldensian Church. 8vo. 9d 1855 

Wilson (R.). Delineation of Aberdeen. Fine plates, crown 8vo, calf. 6s 6d 1822 

Wylie's History of Protestantism. With illustrations, 3 vols., large 8vo, half -calf. (Published 

at 45s), 15s N.D. 
Yarrel's History of British Birds. 3 vols., 8vo, cloth. 50s 1871 
...History of British Fishes. 2 vols., 8vo, half-morocco 1836 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



21 



TTwo ©lo ffrienos* 



That rusty pair of scissors, and that dingy pot of paste, 
May not be called a monument of literary taste ; 
But they're very useful ornaments, with quiet, peace- 
ful ways, 
And they come in mighty handy in the miscellany 

days. 
I don't believe I would enjoy the books and magazines 
If I didn't have this pair of friends to catch the in- 
betweens ; 
The little scraps of dainty verse, and stories worth the 

reading, 
That go to make a paper bright after judicious weeding. 
Suppose I find some melody like Whitcomb Eiley's 

lines, 
Where you hear the boys a-whistling among the sum- 
mer pines, 
I don't allow the fugitive a chance to get away ; 
But cut it out and paste it, and use it the next day. 
Perhaps it's something funny that I chance to come 

upon, 
Or a little bit of wisdom, how this or that is done ; 
Or a scrap of well-told pathos that I think will bring 

the tears, 
Then, just from force of habit, I grab the old brown 

shears. 
Yes, they're public educators, and they always seem to 

cut 
A little better when they lift some gem from out the 

rut 
Of suicides and murders, and long yarns from other 

shores 
Of stories about breadstuffs, or how Benjy does his 

chores. 
And in the years I've used them, they have had a bit 

to do 
With nearly all the folks who write, big one3 and little, 

too. 
And I think they've given pleasure, and perhaps have 

lightened care, 
Because they've caught some sunshine in the journal- 
istic air, 
And have helped to shape it for you, 'mongst the other 

things you read, 
For the brain's a curious creature, and requires a lot of 

feed. 
And you can laugh at paste-pots and scissors, too, I 

trow, 
And say that pen and paper and a grand Websterian 

brow 
Are quite enough material to build a paper up ; 
But the man who knows his business, and wants to fill 

the cup. 
To quench the public thirstiness and suit the public 

taste, 
Will do as Dana does sometimes — let poor news run to 

waste, 
And use someone else's good things, with help of shears 

and paste. 

— Pittsburg Chronicle. 



Fashion authorities say that large checks in men's 
suits will be the fashion in the spring. If the checks 
are in the pocket, and properly signed and endorsed, 
the style will be gladly welcomed. 



Fact ar\d Fictiorv. 



"It is only when a poet is reading his verses, or 
when the parson is preaching, or while a piece of classi- 
cal music is played, that one can surrender the 
thoughts to perfect freedom and let them ramble and 
roam at their own sweet will." 



This, as a specimen of ministerial candour, pleases us 
vastly. It occurs in the new novel by Walter Besant, 
who is or was to have been a clergyman of the Church 
of England. 



This novel—" The Bell of St. Paul's "—which is just 
out in the cheap form (2s. ; cash price, Is. 6d), is very 
pleasant reading. It is idyllic and charming in its 
simplicity. Besant possesses the magic power to turn 
the East End of London into a garden of delight. In 
the present instance he makes the squalid streets and 
courts disappear, and brings before our mind's eye the 
green lanes and quaint old streets in which the poets 
and players of former days lived and moved, laughed 
and sang, untroubled by the sturm und drang which 
weigh upon this generation. 



Apart from the pleasant pictures of Old London, the 
tale is interesting, though one sometimes wonders if 
such characters as he depicts really exist in the East 
End, or if they are simply the visions of a dreamer. 



" As for Novels, read by all means Mr. Besant's de- 
lightful ' The Bell of St. Paul's,' which I took up as a 
task to skip and skim, reviewer-fashion, but had to 
read through with the absorption of the youngest 
young lady subscriber to Mudie's." 



"And what of this new book, that the whole world 
make such a rout about ? — Sterne. 



The new book is "The Little Minister," by J. M. 
Barrie. After appearing as a serial in Good Words, 
it was published in three volumes, price 31s. 6d,, which 
naturally kept it beyond the reach of the ordinary 
book-buyer. A new edition at 7s 6d is announced, 
copies of which we expect daily, and for which we are 
now booking orders. 



We have just received from Messrs. Oliphant, Ander- 
son, & Ferrier a very handy little note-book which they 
call " Books to Read." It is arranged in the form of an 
index, with space in which to jot down the names of 
any books which one wishes to read. In the note with 
which they preface the booklet they say— "So many 
of the daily and weekly journals devote space to the 
reviewing of books, that readers, after laying aside the 
paper, are apt to forget where the notice has appeared 
of a book which they may afterwards desire to see or 
purchase, and are unable to recollect the title, pub- 
lisher's name, or price. This being so, the publishers 



22 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



CROWN 8vo, CLOTH GILT, 3s. 6d. 

The Christian Faith in Bmly Scotland. 

BY REV. E. C. LEAL. 



London : Hamilton, Adams k Co ; Edinburgh : John Menzies & Co. ; Aberdeen : A. Brown & Co. 



INTRODUCTION. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER IV.- 



Canaanite trade with Britain — Baal- worship — The 
various races in ancient Alban — Coming of the 
Romans — Mons Grampius. 

CHAPTER I. — Beginnings— Ninian— Patrick. 

The Christian Faith in Scotland in the 2nd Century — 
British Bishops — Ninian's birth — Journey to Rome — 
Visit to Martin of Tours — Founds the White House, 
with its famous School — Preaches to the Picts — 
His death — Patrick's birth — Captivity in Ireland- 
Escape — Returns to Ireland as a Priest — Morgan alias 
Pelagius goes to Rome and the East — Pelagianism in 
Britain — Palladius sent to Ireland — Patrick ordained 
Bishop and sent — Ireland converted. 

CHAPTER II.— A Stormy Time. 

Apostacy in Britain — Saxon Invasion — "Old King 
Coyl " — Arthur, his various battles, peaceful reign 
and death— The Scots— Coming of Fergus— The 
number who came with him — Their increase in 
"Little Dalriada " — War between Britons and 
Faxons — Civil strife among the Britons — Riderch 
Hael victorious, and reigns from Dunbarton to Der- 
went. 

CHAPTER III.— Kbntigern. 

Kentigern's birth' and parentage — Training in Culross 
by old Servantus — called Munghu — Goes to Cathures 
on the Mollendenor — Consecrated Bishop — The "Cara 
Familia of Glesgu" — The Calladei or Culdees — Driven 
cut and goes to Llanelwy — His return to Glesgu — 
Meeting of Columba and Kentigern — Death of Kenti- 
gern — and of Riderch Hael. 



-Columba comes to Iona. 



Pictland and its Kings — Columba's birth and parentage 
Training and ordination — Battle of Culdremhne — 
" The Cathach " — Columba comes to Alban — Names 
of his companions — Goes to Inverness to Bruidi — 
Raising of the peasant's son — Conversion of Bruidi — 
Founding of St. Machar's Church at the mouth of 
the Don — Columba founds the Church of Deer. 

CHAPTER V.— Aidan's Coronation. 

Vision of the " Glassy Book " — Prophecy concerning 
the line of Aidan — Descent of Scottish and British 
Sovereigns from Aidan — Council of Drumceat — Inde- 
pendence of " Little Dalriada," &c. 

CHAPTER VI.— Visions— Death op Columba. 

The "Hill of Angels" — Vision at Eilan-na-Naoimh — 
Columba's last day — Prophecy concerning Iona — 
Last charge to the brethren — Dies at the altar. 

CHAPTER VII.— Life and Work in Iona. 
Common error regarding the Culdees — Coiumba and 
his clergy never called by that name — First mention 
of Culdees about 843 A.D. — Queen Margaret's endow- 
ment of Culdees — Bede's opinion of Columba and his 
successors — The monastery and the work of the 
monks — Cormac's voyages to the far north — Their 
naval craft— The monastic vow — Monasteries for 
women — The church — The altar — The holy Eucharist 
and the mode of celebrating it — Vestments — The 
Festivals of Easter, Christmas, and Pentecost— Com- 
memoration of the departed — Other services — Con- 
fession and absolution — Fasting — Faith in prayer — 
Blessing for their journeys — Faith in miracles — Hope 
of the resurrection— Columba their patron — Orders 
of Ministry, Bishop, Priest, and Deacon — Existing 
manuscripts of Columba — Baithene succeeds Columba. 






OPINIONS OF THE PRESS 

The Montrose Standard says : — 
To those who desire a short, candid, and easily read 
account of the establishment and growth of Christianity 
in Early Scotland we can recommend this little work. 
. . . It is very neatly got up and clearly printed. 



The Scottish Guardian says : — 
Mr Leal, being aware that there were at least three 
different interpretations put upon the early Ecclesias- 
tical history of Scotland, has, in writing a short account 
of the period, taken nothing on credit, except where he 
has been obliged to, but has, in most instances, resorted 
to the original sources of information. He claims, 
therefore, to write impartially, and we think he has 
succeeded. 

The Free Press says : — 

The work consists of a general introduction and seven 
short chapters. . . . It is not a mere dry record 
that is given. The Author's style throughout is flexible 
and easy, and his narrative is not lacking either in 
force or graphic power. The concluding chapter, in 



particular, devoted to " Life and Work in Iona," gives 
a remarkably comprehensive and vivid sketch of the 
daily doings of Columba and his companions, as well as 
of their habits of thought and speech, and their whole 
material environment We give the volume our hearty 
commendation. 

The Tablet says :— 
We congratulate the Author upon his impartiality. 
He tells us what the documents say. Others may 
interpret and comment as they like, but he tells us a 
plain, unvarnished tale. Let us add that this only 
professes to be a popular handbook, and as such we can 
recommend it. 

The Glasgow Herald says :— 
The book contains much antiquarian information, and 
no small light is thrown on the etymology of places. 
The work is a valuable contribution to the literature of 
historical investigation, and cannot fail to prove of 
interest to those who wish to become better acquainted 
with the civil and ecclesiastical condition of Scotland 
during the earlier centuries of our era. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



23 



have thought that this little book, prepared primarily 
as a list of some of their own publications, might be 
useful otherwise to book-buyers, furnishing, as it does, 
space for entering at once under alphabetical headings 
the particulars regarding any book that may come 
under their notice. " A. Brown & Co. will be happy 
to send a copy on receipt of one penny stamp to cover 
postage. 



Messrs. Maclehose & Sons have just published a book 
on "Medieval Scotland," by R. W. Cochran-Patrick, 
which ought to be of considerable interest to those 
with antiquarian tastes. It contains chapters on agri- 
culture, manufactures, factories, taxation, revenue, 
trade, commerce, weights and measures. The frontis- 
piece shows a pint-stoup and a choppin, or half -pint 
stoup. The price is 7s. 6d. net. 



It is by no means certain that, if the choice of a 
stage for our performance were offered to the most 
contented among us, we should be satisfied to speak 
our parts and go through our actor's business upon the 
boards of this world. Some would prefer to take their 
properties, their player's crowns and robes, their 
aspiring expressions, and their finely-expressed aspira- 
tions, before the audience of a larger planet ; others, 
perhaps the majority, would choose, with more 
humility as well as with more common sense, the 
shadowy scenery, the softer footlights, and the less 
exigent public of a modest asteroid, beyond the reach 
of our earthly haste, of our noisy and unclean high- 
roads to honour, of our furious chariot races round the 
goals of fame, and, especially, beyond the reach of 
competition. — F. Marion Crawford. 



A contemporary has discovered that the world uses 
8,500,000 steel pens every day. We do not know upon 
what he bases his estimate, but we do know that 
Brown's Bon- Accord Pen forms a considerable and 
rapidly increasing proportion of this 3^ millions. The 
reason of this is that it does not scratch ; it writes 
easily, and suits almost any hand. Gross boxes, 2s 6d. 
Sample boxes, 6d each ; post free, 7 stamps. 



One of the greatest "signs of the times" has just 
been put up by Messrs James Stephen & Sons, colour* 
men and picture frame makers in Woolmanhill. It is 
50 feet long, and is, we believe, the largest sign in 
Aberdeen. The letters, which are cut out of solid 
wood, are about 4 feet high, and being brightly gilt with 
English gold, have a striking effect as seen from the 
Rosemount Viaduct. 



Reasonable Prices & Good Work 

AT 

W. JQIalaY & SONS, 

printers anb ftitbograpbers, 

23 BF*ID<£ 55F?EE5, 

ABERDEEN. 



Office of " Scottish Notes and Queries." 



XTbe Best Uwo Boofes, 



In no list I met of the best hundred books, when 
that craze took the place of spelling-bees and the Fif- 
teen Puzzle, do I recollect seeing mention made of my 
two favourite works. The first of them is not in prose 
or verse ; it is not a work of theology, or philosophy, or 
science, or art, or history, or fiction, or general litera- 
ture. It is at once the most comprehensive and im- 
partial book I know. This paragraph is assuming the 
aspect of a riddle. Being in a mild and passionless 
way a lover of my species, I am a loather of riddles, so 
I will go no further on the downward way, but declare 
the name, title, and style of my book to be Nuttall's 
Standard Dictionary. Cast your eyes along your own 
bookshelves of English authors ; every word, liberally 
speaking, that is in each and every volume on your 
shelves is in my Nuttall ! Here is the juice of the 
language from Shakspeare to Huxley, in a concentrated 
solution. This is the only book I know of which no 
man living is, or ever can be, the master. Charles 
Lamb would not allow that dictionaries are books at 
all. In his days they were white-livered charlatans 
compared with the full-blooded enthusiast, Nuttall. 
The systematic study of the book is to be deplored. It 
is, like the Essays of Elia, not to be read through at a 
sitting, but to be dipped into curiously when one is in 
the vein. The charm of Lamb is in the flavour ; and one 
cannot reach the more remote and finer joys of taste if 
one eats quickly. 

My second book would be Whitaker's Almanac. This 
is another of the books that Charles Lamb 
classes among the no-books. As in the case of 
Nuttall, there was no Whi taker in his days, and cer- 
tainly no almanac at all so good. I freely own I am a 
bigot in this matter ; I have never given any other 
almanac a fair chance, and, what is worse, I have 
firmly made up my mind not to give any other one any 
chance at all. I place my faith in Whitaker, and am 
ready to go to the stake (provided it is understood that 
nothing unpleasant takes place there) chanting my be- 
lief and glorying in my doom. If you took away Whit- 
aker's Almanac from me I do not know how I should 
get on. It is a book for daily use and permanent re- 
ference. It is worth all the Livys and Tacituses that 
ever breathed and lied. It is more truthful than the 
sun, for that luminary is always eight minutes in ad- 
vance of where it seems to be. It is as impartial and 
veracious as fossilising mud. It contains infinitely 
more figures than Madame Tussaud's, and teaches of 
everything above and under the sun, from stellar in- 
fluences to sewage. How is the daily paper to be 
understood, lacking the aid of Whitaker ? Who is the 
honourable member for Berborough, of whom the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer spoke in such sarcastic 
terms last night ? For what place sits Mr. Snivel, who 
made that most edifying speech yesterday ? How old 
is the Earl of Champagne, who has been appointed 
Governor of Labuan ? Where is Labuan ? What are 
the chances of a man of forty (yourself) living to be a 
hundred ? and what is the chance of a woman of sixty- 
four (your mother-in-law) dying next year ? How much 
may one deduct from one's income with a view to in- 
come-tax before one needs begin to lie ? What annuity 
ought a man of your age be able to get for the five 
thousand pounds you expect on the death of your 
mother-in-law ? How much will you have to pay to 
the State if you article your son to a solicitor, or give 
him a little capital, and start him in an honest business 



24 Brown's Bookstall. 



<S. /TlMtcbell /Ifooir, 

flANOFORTE, ORQAN, & ^1U51C SELLER, 

Respectfully invites Inspection to his Stock of 

PIANOFORTES & AMBSIOAN 0HG4NS, 

Only keeping Instruments of the most Durable Construction, with Check 

Actions, Iron Frames, every Modern Improvement in the Mechanism, with 

full Musical Tone and Crisp Touch. In carefully designed, elegantly 

finished Cases, at very Moderate Prices. 



A CALL SOLICITED AT 

<A 82 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. I» 



BUIrfomfl) PENS 

Are constructed on a scientific basis. A rolling ball^ has of all bodies the greatest 
momentum with the least resistance. Applied to pen points the outcome is astonish- 
ingly pleasant. There are twelve varieties of Bau^-Pointkd Pkns, which, experience 
proves, will suit all hands. The following are the most popular — For Book-keeping, 
516KF., 52 if. ; For General Correspondence, 516F., 526M. ; For Fluent Writing, 
532F-, 537M. 

If uncertain — buy an assorted box, and choose a pen to suit your hand. 

While at your stationer's also ask for a 

"FEDERATION" PENHOLDER. 




It prevents the pen from blotting when laid on the desk, and gives a firm and comfort- 
able grip for the fingers. 

Manufactured for ORMISTON & GLASS, LONDON, 

AND SUPPLIED BY ALL STATIONERS. 



Brown's Book-Staix. 



25 



as a pawnbroker ? How old is the judge that charged 
dead against the prisoner whom the jury acquitted 
without leaving the box ? Is there anything now worth 
a gentleman's while to smuggle on his return from the 
Continent ? When may one begin to eat oysters ? 
What was the most remarkable event last year ? How 
much longer is it likely to pay to breed farmers in 
England ? These are only a few, very few, of the 
queries Whitaker will answer cheerfully for you. In- 
deed, you can scarcely frame any question to which it 
will not give a reply of some kind or other. — Abridged 
from '* Ignorant Essays " by Richard Bowling, which 
volume of pleasant essays may be had for Is. net. 



Nuttall's Dictionary referred to above is published at 
3s. 6d., and is supplied at 2s. 6d. net. 



But even Nuttall is eclipsed by Annandale's New 
Dictionary, just published at 5s. Cash price 3s. 9d. 
net. Full details of which are to be found on page 8. 



The complete edition of Whitaker's Almanac, bound 
with leather back, is published at 2s. 6d., and is supplied 
at Is. lid. net by A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street. 



Sarab battle on Wttbist. 



' " A clear fire, a clean hearth, and the rigour of the 
game.' This was the celebrated wish of old Sarah 
Battle (now with God), who, next to her devotions, 
loved a good game of whist." Had the sainted Sarah 
been alive now she would have added also — 




:f8ailab of :(Boofe*f>unter8* 



In torrid heats of late July, 

In March, beneath the bitter bise, 
He book-hunts while the loungers fly — 

He book-hunts though December freeze ; 
In breeches baggy at the knees, 

And heedless of the public jeers, 
For these, for these, he hoards his fees — 

Aldines, Bodonis, Elzevirs. 

No dismal stall escapes his eye, 

He turns o'er tomes of low degrees, 
There soiled romanticists may lie 

Or Restoration comedies ; 
Each tract that flutters in the breeze, 

For him is charged with hopes and fears, 
In mouldy novels fancy sees 

Aldines, Bodonis, Elzevirs. 

With restless eyes that peer and spy, 

Sad eyes that heed not skies nor trees, 
In dismal nooks he loves to pry, 

Whose motto evermore is Spez ! 
But ah ! the fabled treasure flees ; 

Grown rarer with the fleeting years. 
In rich men's shelves they take their ease — 

Aldines, Bodonis, Elzevirs. 

ENVOY. 

Prince, all the things that tease and please — 
Fame, hope, wealth, kisses, cheers, and tears, 

What are they but such toys as these — 
Aldines, Bodonis, Elzevirs? 

— Lang's Ballades in Blue China. 




26 



Brown' s'Book-Stau,. 



Bret Ibarte* 




SNOW-BOUND AT EAGLE'S. 
by Bret Harte. 2s. ; Cash, Is. 6d. 

" The story and the situation are entirely original. 
. . . The dialogue serves to bring out the indivi- 
duality of each character, a rare excellence. The plot 
is natural, and the situations striking and suggestive. 
The word-painting is a triumph of simplicity and 
literary instinct. ... By all lovers of literature, 
as well as by all lovers of fiction, ' Snow-bound at 
Eagle's ' will be enjoyed as containing some of its dis- 
tinguished author's best and most characteristic work. " 
— Pictorial World. 

"'Snow-bound at Eagle's' is in a somewhat gayer 
vein than most of Mr. Bret Harte's stories. The scene 
is, as usual, laid in the Far West, and the effect of the 
story consists in the contrast between the wild life and 
the civilization which lie so close together, and the 
setting of it shows another fresh bit of vigorously 
sketched landscape. . . . The characters are struck 
off with the author's invariable precision, and the story- 
is told with his own inimitable terseness and careful 
avoidance of any reflections or descriptions which do 
not make directly for the end he has in view. It is one 
of his brightest and most readable stories. " — Athenceum. 



OTHER BOOKS by Bret Hartk, in 
Picture Boards, is. 6d. each for cash : — 

An Heiress of Red Dog*. 

The Luck of Roaring' Camp. 

Californian Stories. 

Gabriel Conroy. 

Flip. 

Maruja. 

A Phyllis of the Sierras. 




OPEN. 



The Pocket Book shown above we find 
much appreciated on account of its simplicity, 
durability, and cheapness. The cover is 
solid leather, with inside pockets. The price 
is only 1/-, and the Note Book can be 
replaced for Id. 




A. BROWN & CO. 

77 UNION STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Staix. 



27 



©n IReattng. 



Books there are with medicine for every mood. 
Walter Besant. 



It is, perhaps, the greatest pleasure you will have in 
life, the one you will think of longest, and repent of 
least. If my life had been more full of calamity than 
it has been I would live it over again to have read the 
books I did in my youth. — Hazlitt. 



The heart must choose the book that shines on it. 
Experience alone can teach us where we shall find the 
sympathy of which we are in need among those silent 
servants " within whose folding, soft, eternal charm we 
love to lie." But the more we are thrown upon the 
sympathy of books, and acquire the habit of appealing 
to them in every mood, in every nervous vicissitude, 
the more we shall become convinced of the truth of 
what Isaac Barrow says, "that he who loveth a book 
will never want a faithful friend, a wholesome counsel- 
lor, a cheerful companion, or an effectual comforter." 
— Edmund Gosse. 



A good reader is nearly as rare as a good writer. . 
. . The man of taste will choose his book, so far as 
he may, according to the season and his own disposition 
at the moment ; waiting for the rays that occasionally 
dart from it, in some happy transparency and warmth 
of the mind. — Willmott. 



Uhc Slaves Enslaved 



Oh, it's worth a brace of dollars 
Just to hear how Jenkins hollers 
When his weekly shirts and collars 
He doth get, he doth get : 

For his servant, harum-scarum, 
Still omits to dry and air 'em, 
So the wretch is forced wear 'em 
Wringing wet, wringing wet. 

And the cause of this ill-using 
Is that she is aye perusing 
An absorbing and amusing 
Novelette, novelette ! 



-Pick-me-up. 



She probably subscribed to Cassell's Saturday 
Journal. 




QZJNZ^AL & FURJMI5H1JMQ rpOJMMOJMQEft 

88 Union Street, 




LAMPS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



28 Brown's Book-Stall. 



$amee Stepben & %one. 



PICTURE FRAME DEPARTMENT. 

As we have now the largest and most Extensive Premises in Scotland, Customers 
may rely on getting all their Orders carefully and promptly executed. We have 
always on hand a large variety of 

eroiDGifc enGRAYinG$, oil PAinTinG$, uiaTep colours, 

0LG0GRSPI)$, ADD <£BROmO$. 

Pictures of every description framed. Hundreds of Patterns of Mouldings 
to select from. Speciality in CUT-OUT MOUNTS. 

Drawings and Photographs Mounted in Plain or Gat-Oat Mounts. 

B<?st £r;?Ii$I? Cold ^ra/rv?s for Oil paiptiijgs, * ■*• * 

-*. ^ -*. U/ater Colours, ftjgravipgs, photographs, 8e» 

MIRROR FRAMES RE-GILT; OLD FRAMES RE-GILT; EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF GILDING WORK DONE. 



PICTURE RODS FITTED UP AND PICTURES HUNG. 



JAMES STEPHEN & SONS, 

CAEVERS, CKEXjIDEIRS;, 

flIMrror anb picture ^ftame flftanufacturers, 

FINE ART PUBLISHERS, ARTISTS, COLORMEN, &c, 

48, 49, AND 50 WOOLMANHILL, 






(Opposite Entrance Gate to Royal Infirmary.) 



WORKS-RODGER'S WAKE!, JOHN STREET. 

TELEPHONE— No. 553. 



I ROBERT HENDERSON 

HAS NOW COMMENCED HIS 

JREAT ANNUAL SPRING CHEAP SALE. 



Great Bargains are being given to insure the thorough clearance 
before taking delivery of Goods purchased for the Spring Trade. 



Catalogue of Bargains may be had on Application. 



33 & 35 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 

WK CAN'T AFFORD TO GIVE AWAY 

NOTEPAPER + + 



4SS 



* For NOTHING : 



But we do Supply One Pound of CLUB VELLUM NOTEPAPER 
for 6j^d., and One Hundred Envelopes to Match for 6^d. 



CALL AND SEE IT OR WRITE FOR A SAMPLE. 



A- BROWN & GO., Statiorxers, 77 Ur\ior\ St., 

ABERDEEN". 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



The BON-ACCORD SHIRT, 



All sizes, extra Width of Front, 



EVENING DRESS. 



SPECIALTY. 



5 PER GENT. DISCOUNT 



FOR CASH. 



BEAVER, MELTON, 



VICUNA 



Overcoatings, 



NEWEST SHADES. 



SPECIAL 

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£4 4s. 

5 Per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



FIRST 
DELIVERY 

OF 

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SUITINGS. 



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ABERDEEN. 



COLLARS, 
CUFFS, 



AND 



HOSIERY. 



2)ress Suit 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, I J£4 JOS. 

ABERDEEN. 

5 Per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
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The BON-ACCORD SHIRT 



Evening Dress, 



5s., 6s., 7s. 6d., & 8s. 6d. 



S P J@l C I Ala X TT x 



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Newest Designs 

AND 

Colourings 

IN 

Spring Tweeds. 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



Aberdeen : James Leatham, Printer, 15 St. Nicholas Street. 




No. 3 . 



MARCH. 



1892. 



(lorn Britisfi am fllreniiii! Iprap Co., 

IN WHICH IS NOW MERGED 

THE SCOTTISH PROVINCIAL ASSURANCE CO. 



FIRE, LIFE, AND ANNUITIES. 

B« •■••••••• ••••••••• ••■•••• 

Incorporated by Royal Charter and Special Acts of Parliament. 
Total Assets exceed £10,000 ,000. 

The Funds of the L,ife Department are not liable for obligations under the Fire 
Department, nor are the Funds of the Fire Department liable for obligations under the 
Life Department. In this Company, therefore, the Investments for the L,ife Depart- 
ment are kept entirely separate from those of the Fire Department, as set forth in the 
Balance Sheet. 



Income for 1890, 



£2,487,839. 



gLhtxXmn iSaariJ, 



GEORGE COLLIE, Esq., Advocate. 
JAMES F. LUMSDEN, Esq., Advocate. 
ALEX. M. OGSTON, Esq. of Ardoe. 



WILLIAM YEATS, Esq. of Auquharney. 
JOHN WHYTE, Esq., Advocate. 
JOHN COOK, Esq., Banker. 



Local Manager— GEORGE W. W. BARCLAY. 
Fire Superintendent— J). B. MILNE. 

Prospectuses and full information as to several important features recently introduced can be 
obtained at the Chief Offices, Branches, and Agencies. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

Edinburgh— 64 Princes Street ; London— 6i Threadneedle Street, E.C. 

Aberdeen Office : 91 UNION STREET. 



Seeds of Superlative Quality 



AT 



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11 Bridge Street, 






By Special Appointment Patronised b/ 




royol m pons. 



To The Queen. 




H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 



JOHN FORD & CO., 

QLAS5 AND GHINA JMERCHANTS, 
136 & 138 UNION STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 



Also, at 39 Princes Street, and Holyrood Glass Works, 

EDINBURGH. 




\ 



/ 



/ 




The Shop in which Alexander Brown began business in 1785. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



g^fc^ T£^T£^T£^T^^ 



ENGLISH MANUFACTURES. 



TO CONSUMERS OF 

OFFICE AJ^D DR/iWIJMQ PZJMGILS. 

Use only Pencils of ENGLISH MANUFACTURE. They are 
superior in every respect to those of Foreign make. 



BANK OF ENGLAND 

PURE [CUMBERLAND LEAD 

SPANIS H~~GRA PHITE 
TOUGHENED LEAD 

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ARE SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED. THEY ARE MADE BY 

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STEAM PENCIL WORKS, 
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Brown's Book-Stau,. 



Brown's Bberfceen Bookstall 




No. III. 



@^^^ HE rent of the small shop 
II i in the Upperkirkgate 

opened by Mr. Brown in 
1785 being only ^12, in- 
clusive of a workshop, 
was not, even with the 
then enhanced value of 
money, such a very seri- 
ous venture we would 

I llltS IS ■ now tn ^ n ^- But ^ was 
serious enough for a 
prudent Scotchman, who, 
brought up to know the value of a penny, 
knows full well the value of a pound. 
Not being one of those men who call 
upon Jupiter to aid them, while they sit 
with folded hands waiting for customers, 
Mr. Brown took measures to bring them, 
and by his general intelligence, and 
attractiveness of manner he, as it were, 
compelled them to come in, and once in, 
the most casual visitor beconre a regular 
customer. Activity of mind and body 
was hereditary, and in a marked degree 
has been transmitted through, at least 
three generations. Given the proper 
soil and suitable conditions, this mental 
activity in families, and also in com- 
munities, seems an erratic and uncon- 
trollable quantity ; it may lie dormant 
long, and suddenly it breaks out with 
the — at present — seeming irregularity of 
sun-spots, new stars, bad seasons, com- 
mercial panics, and epidemics, for none 
of which we have as yet discovered the 
bacillus, nor the mode of inoculation to 
mitigate their effects. All historical 
writers notice the outburst of mental 
activity which took place at the end of 
last century, after a long period of 
" mental inanity," as Carlyle would 
phrase it. Germany had been so ex- 
hausted by the Thirty Years' War that 
it had never recovered, and was even yet 
sunk in lethargy, but France was in a 
state of fermentation. Had Voltaire and 
the French Encyclopaedists been stamped 
out in time, this torpor might have 



been indefinitely prolonged all over the 
continent. But the Roman " L,iber Ex- 
purgatorious " was of no avail. liberty 
of thought and speech were the bacillae 
of the age, and were everywhere present, 
especially so in France, where they found 
a congenial soil and a feverish atmos- 
phere, in which corruption revelled. 
There it simmered ("all the tokens of 
revolution" being previously observed 
by Arthur Young), there it effervesced 
and reached the boiling point, when, the 
steam valve being officially closed, " the 
kettle o' the Kirk and State " exploded 
with disastrous result — utter ruin to 
red-tape and officialism, great loss of 
life, sans-culottism, communism, devilry 
(nothing less), and a great fund of 
experience which has been found most 
valuable to the world ever since. 

But "Revenons a nos moutons" for we 
have wandered. Comparing great things 
with small, the bacillae seems to have 
reached Aberdeen at an early stage, for 
at this time there was great fermentation 
amongst the Burgesses of Guild. The 
last straw had been laid on their hitherto 
patient and long-suffering backs, but 
now they made loud and indignant 
complaints of the tyrannical actings of 
the self-elected Council and Magistrates, 
of the increased and ever increasing 
charges of the Town Clerk, Carnegie. 
They demanded access to the records of 
the town, and a fair representation in the 
Council from their number. The pages 
of the Aberdeen Journal ai -e full of their 
complaints, and these were all collected 
in a pamphlet, published in 1785, which 
shows that John Ewen, jeweller, Castle 
Street (author of "The Boatie Rows"), 
Patrick Barron, of Woodside, and some 
fifty other true and faithful citizens were 
reformers before the Reform Bill, and 
set the ball a-rolling which — not how- 
ever until fifty years after — gave the 
citizens civil rights and privileges un- 
known before, and long so obstinately 
withheld that there was positive danger 
of an explosion. 

The man who cannot conduct his own 
business well is not likely to manage pub- 
lic business efficiently, and Mr. Brown, 



32 



Brown's Book-Staix. 




IMPERIAL 
PARCHMENT 

mot: 

PRIVATE GENTLEMEN AND BUSINESS FIRMS 

Who look to excellence and style in their 

WRITING PAPER 

Should adopt this beautiful paper. It is made with 

GLAZED OR PLAIN SURFACE, 

And is an agreeable and High-Class Paper at an ECONOMICAL PRICE. 

TO BE HAD FROM ALL 

Aberdeen Booksellers and Stationers 



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Brown's Book-Staix. 



33 



being prudent, was far too busy looking 
after his own business to take part in 
this scrimmage. His exertions were soon 
crowned with gratifying success. From 
the very first Drs. Beattie, Hamilton, 
Glennie, Livingston and other professors 
were customers, and so were their 
students. The patronage of men like 
these was a good testimonial, almost of 
itself sufficient to ensure success, and so 
in a very short time his business connec- 
tion was large, and so much was he 
trusted that he had orders from many 
county families to forward all books of 
merit to them immediately on publication. 
No doubt he kept them well posted up 
in current literature, and so made his 
own private interest subserve the public 
benefit. But that this confidence was 
not abused is evident, because it was 
continued for full fifty years with great 
satisfaction to both parties. He had thus 
this immense advantage, that of all 
standard books, "which no gentleman's 
library should be without," he could 
with perfect safety order a quantity 
which must have been gratifying to the 
publishers. They are always quick 
enough to recognise the value of agents 
who can dispose of the largest number of 
their publications, and so it came to 
pass that in all after advertisements of 
books in the local papers by southern 
publishers Mr. Brown's name always 
stood first as their agent. Where neither 
his name nor that of Angus & Son was 
attached the advertisement was looked 
upon somewhat with suspicion, which in 
the long-run was generally justified. 
His first year's cash sales amounted to 
nearly ^300, while his debits, amounting 
to seven times this amount, encouraged 
him to become a Burgess of Guild in 
1787, Sept. 15 (the entry money having 
been raised in 1779 from ^13 to £26), 
and his stock accumulating ; in 1790 he 
published a catalogue of his books. 
Next year he began the formation of a 
circulating library, and advertised a sale 
by auction in Provost Jopp's Close, 
Broad Street, of eight nights of books 
and three of prints, which seems to show 
that he had not neglected to cultivate a 



taste for the fine arts. So far as is known, 
he was the first in Aberdeen to introduce 
the auctioning of books, and traditions 
were current some thirty years ago that 
his sales were the resort of all the literary 
men in the city, attracted by his know- 
ledge of books, and by the free, very free, 
witty remarks in which he gilded the 
philosophic pill. Instances might be 
given, but they do not suit the latitude 
nor the longitude of the present day. 

He had gradually increased the number 
of his assistants. And in 1791, and he took 
as an apprentice David Wyllie, who con- 
tinued in his employment for twenty-four 
years ; and then, starting in business on 
his own account, he took as his first appren- 
tice a very young boy named Lewis Smith, 
who in after years filled most worthily 
the offices of Councillor, Baillie, and 
Treasurer of the City, and was one of our 
most notable citizens. Of him much 
might, and may yet be said ; but on the 
principle of never putting off till to- 
morrow what may be done to-day, let it 
be now said, that, next to Provost Brown, 
no man was better entitled to be con- 
sidered a literary benefactor to the city 
than Baillie Smith, who is still well 
represented in business by his sons. He 
was a model man of business ; quick in 
temper, and as quick in exposing all 
humbug and pretence. He was much too 
practical a man to ply the pen himself, 
although he could do it ; but of all men 
he had the keenest appreciation of rising 
literary talent in others, and in his day, 
which was much later than Provost 
Brown's, he did more than any other, to 
encourage and bring to the front the 
literary talent of the city. He had no 
petty jealousy of rivals-in-trade, as the 
present writer can testify, and here he 
gratefully acknowledges many obliga- 
tions to him for his invariable kindness 
and courtesy. At the writer's request, 
and among the last things he did, Baillie 
Smith drew out for him, his " Recollec- 
tions of his Connection with Aberdeen 
Literature." This is still in existence, 
and it is matter of regret that neither of 
his sons, nor his talented and literary 
son-in-law have made this public, or even 



34 Brown's Book-Stall. 



"The Concise Dictionary stands first— and by a long interval— among all 
the one-volume English Dictionary." — The Academy. 

I 

Just published. In One Volume, 864 pages, fcap. 4to, containing over 
80,000 entries, cloth, 5s. 

NEW AND CHEAPER EDITION, 

WITH EXTENSIVE SUPPLEMENT AND VALUABLE APPENDICES. 

A CONCISE DICTIONARY 

OF THE 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

ETYMOLOGICAL AND PRONOUNCING, LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC, AND TECHNICAL. 

By CHARLES ANNANDALE, M.A., LL.D., 

Editor of Ogilvic's " Imperial Dictionary ," New Edition; Blacklegs 
"Modern Cyclopedia" <5c. 



H NNANDALE'S CONCISE DICTIONARY has, since its first publication, held a 
Y"i pre-eminent place among one-volume English Dictionaries. It is now issued, in 
an extended form, at the low price of 5s., and is thus brought within the reach of 
everybody. 



It gives full and intelligible explanations, 
with the correct pronunciation, and really 
trustworthy etymology, of all English 
words in current use. It contains more 
matter than any dictionary of similar price, 
is admirably printed, and handy in size. 

While the general Vocabulary included 
in it is very ample, both as regards simple 
words and compounds, one of its chief aims 
is to explain clearly and accurately all im- 
portant modern terms pertaining to 

science, technology and the arts, since it 

is these terms that lead the great majority 
of readers most frequently to consult the 
dictionary. 



On the etymology such an amount of 
care has been bestowed as the great import- 
ance of the subject demands, the whole of 
the most recent investigators having been 
consulted and taken advantage of. 

The correct pronunciation of the words 
is shown on an exceedingly simple system, 
the key-words for the different sounds be- 
ing given at the foot of each page. 

Pronouncing Lists of ancient and modern 
biographical and geographical names, and 
lists of foreign words and phrases, abbrevi- 
ations, &c, are given by way of appendix. 



The New Edition is augumented by Thirty-two pages of matter, containing the 
following additions : — (1) Supplement of Additional Woi r ds and Terms. (2) Key to noted 
Names i?i Fiction, Mythology, hfc. (3) List of Authors, with Dates of Birth and Death. 
(4) Form of Address to Persons of Rank and Title. (5) Money Systems of the Countries 
of the World. 

The CONCISE DICTIONARY is published in three styles of Binding : 

Cloth, red edges, 5s. \ Half-bound Roxburghe, . . 6s. 6d. 
Half-morocco, 9s. 



BLACKIE & SON, Limited, London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Dublin, 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



35 



semi-public. It embraced the most in- 
teresting period of the history of literature 
in Aberdeen — the period of transition 
between the old regime and the new — an 
era worthy of remembrance, and no one 
better than Baillie Smith could possibly 
do it the same justice, for no one knew it 
so well. 

In his small den in the Upperkirkgate 
— not to be looked upon without rever- 
ence, however — Mr. Brown soon found 
himself so " cribbed, cabined, and con- 
fined" that, like the hermit crab, he was 
obliged to look out for a new shell. His 
frequent auctions in Jopp's Close had 
doubtless drawn his attention to the ad- 
joining property — the corner house of 
Queen Street and Broad Street — and on 
March 23, 1793, he leased the whole house 
at a rent of ££>o 10s,, with £2 for a work- 
shop, taking over as tenants a Mrs. Paul, 
and James Staats Forbes, who was Quarter- 
master, wine merchant in Queen Street, 
and the proprietor of the Lochlands, 
which in after years he sold to a Tontine 
Society for the then very large sum of 
^10,000. A man of property like this 
bulked largely in Aberdeen Society at 
the time, and he and Mr. Brown had 
many business transactions together. 
The leasing of this house (afterwards" his 
own property) was an immense advance 
for Mr. Brown ; it was five times his 
former rent, but it is quite clear he had 
all his wits about him, and it was well 
considered. 

Two years after (17th Feb., 1795) he 
married Catherine, daughter of James 
Chalmers, printer, the proprietor of the 
Aberdeen Jon??ial, and the successor of 
our first printer, Raban ; and, getting 
rid of his tenants, he got installed into a 
home of his own. His new family 
connection seems to have stimulated his 
publishing propensities, for he now 
issued a catalogue, including the libraries 
of the late Dr. Gerard, the Rev. Hugh 
Hay, Dr. Copland, and Dr. Duncan 
Shaw, of Aberdeen, all recently purchased 
by him. The following year (1797) he 
published Iceland's " Deistical Writers," 
which cost him ^243 7s. 5d. ; but it was 
successful, and paid him satisfactorily. 



There being an invasion panic in 1798, 
Mr. Brown then published three editions 
of Bishop Watson's " Patriotic Address," 
and next year was appointed Captain in 
the Light Infantry Volunteer Regiment, 
his commission being signed by the 
Duke of Portland ; but his publishing 
went on briskly — " Hamilton's Course of 
Mathematics," " Riddoch's Sermons," 3 
vols., 8vo, and " Campbell's Lectures," 2 
vols, (for the copyright of which he paid 
£106), were all brought out in two years, 
while he had meanwhile instituted a 
musical library to supply a needed want 
to the music-loving citizens. 

So much had his old books accumu- 
lated that in 1801 he published a catalogue 
of 15,000 volumes, and his London 
correspondent and new-found relative, 
Alex. Chalmers, of the " Biographical 
Dictionary," says of it that "the classifica- 
tion is just as good as any here. Your 
prices are upon the whole very moderate 
— far below the London ones." And he 
points out some great bargains in it, but 
says — " For your market it may be necess- 
ary to keep a moderate proportion to 
London prices." 

When it is remembered that there 
were no numbers to the houses or shops 
in the streets, we see in the olden time 
quite sufficient reason for the distinctive 
signs adopted by innkeepers and mer- 
chants as trade marks are at the present 
day. And for booksellers nothing could be 
more appropriate than the heads of those 
eminent authors by whose brains book- 
sellers made their bread. Andrew 
Shirrefs might well have had Allan 
Ramsay's head painted as his sign. Wm. 
Mortimer had Shakespeare's, others had 
Milton and Dryden, and Mr. Brown had 
that of Homer. His shop was known 
as "Homer's Head" down to 1831, when, 
on the removal to a numbered shop in 
Union Street, this sign disappeared. 
Other heads lingered longer, and were 
sometimes curiously emblematic of the 
class of literature dealt in by the 
occupants. William Russell, of genial 
memory, fell heir to "Shakespeare's 
Head," and so his shop was the natural 
haunt of all the actors who visited the 



36 Brown's Book-Stall. 



Telegrams-" LORIMER, BOOTMAKER, ABERDEEN." 





I 




^BOOJ AJMD SJ40E S/ILOO^S, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 
157 UNION STREET, 

LIAVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, includ- 
+ ing every variety of 

JBoots, Shoes, ano Slippers, 



:fo:r ladies, gentlemen j^jstjd children. 

In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly on hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shooting, Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ©roers of lEvcvy description /Ifoafce to /Ifeeasuve. 

..&M RIDING BOOTS. FISHING BOOTS. SHOOTING BOOTS. )f\G).. 



*wM FIELD BOOTS. LIVERY BOOTS. | HIGHLAND BROGUES. Jfe^ 

I ; j 

5 PER CENT. DISCOUNT FOR CASH PAYMENTS. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



37 



city. On his retirement he kindly made 
offer to Brown & Co. of the stock and 
goodwill of this department, which was 
shown to be valuable ; but it was not 
Homeric ; not at all in their way, and was 
very gratefully declined, although offered 
quite gratuitously. 

Those who laboriously dig into the 
files of the Aberdeen Journal about this 
period cannot fail to have their attention 
arrested by a small but spirited and 
well-cut sketch of the head of the old, 
blind, wandering Greek poet. It shines 
out there in the uniform dull-like 
columns as a very star, and points the 
way to Mr. Brown's own advertisements. 
And so in the good old Scottish fashion 
by which the " Laird" was styled by the 
name of his estate, Mr. Brown's name 
got conjoined with that of the father of 
literature. Could there possibly be a 
more honoured title ? 




The Pencil Sharpeners which we advertised in our first 
number have been giving great satisfaction, and [are 
still going fast. 

We have now got a large size suitable for sharpening 
very thick pencils or crayons. Although larger in size 
the price is the same, and either the large or the small 
may be had post free for One Shilling from A. Brown 
& Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



1 



foCLUBWMM 

flOTEfAPER f§*$ 

A BROWN & CO. ^^JL 

STATIONERS, ■ B6> 

77. Union Street, ABERDEEN. \^ . 



'MM 

iBftmunb (Bosse on tbe " Best 
Boofes/' 



To limit our sympathies in books to those which are 
the best accredited and the most classical is like refus- 
ing to know anybody whose movements are not 
chronicled in the Morning Post. 

It is not an enviable social aim to be always trying to 
know none but the " best " people. 

Everybody who is worth his salt has seedy friends, 
friends who have been failures, friends who possess some 
uncontrollable foible which prevents them being uni- 
versal favourites. 

Each of us, I hope, understands the weakness of 
loving someone who does not seem lovable to all the 
world. 

So it would be with our friendships. 

In idle moments, when one is tired or dispirited, one 
finds one's fingers drumming on the panes of erne's 
bookcase, and one asks one's self — " What shall I 
read ? " 

I know that, in my own case, some rascally old 
comedy often gets taken down, although "Paradise 
Regained " is austerely frowning at the side of it, or else 
Sterne glides naturally into hands which know' they 
ought to be engaged on Gibbon. 

Is it that if someone suddenly came up and said — 
"Do you seriously prefer the lax frivolities of Van- 
brugh to Milton's noble appeals to the sanctified 
imagination" I could answer "Yes?" Certainly not. 
But why should I pretend to be always "seriously pre- 
ferring " anything ? 

There are moods in which it is our privilege not to be 
serious ; and then the second-rate and the third-rate 
literature has its day, all the queer books and the silly 
books, the books that ran too far ahead of their age and 
the books that lagged too far behind. 

I positively refuse to be always reading " Rob Roy " 
for the eighth time. 

I would rather read again " Count Robert of Paris " 
and "St. Ronan's Well" than do that; while, in 
point of fact, as soon as Professor Pococurante's back is 
turned I blaspheme the name of Sir Walter in a 
whisper, and I take up Smollet or Leigh Hunt, or some 
yellow book of tales by poor M. de Maupassant. 

Anything for liberty and sympathy, and to assert the 
right of a free Englishman to read what he likes to 
read. 

Away with the " Mahabharata " ! Away with the 
" Sheking " ! 

If I want to be bored, I will be bored with what I 
choose. I will read " Polexander " or the "Leviathan " 
of Mr. Hobbes. 



38 Brown's Book-Stall. 




Littlejohn &, Son's 



aAi 



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THEY ARE UNEXCELLED 
FOR QUALITY AND CHEAPNESS. 



J. LITTLEJOHN & SONS, 



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* SCOTT CHALMERS, « 

4 General $j Furnishing Ironmonger i 
f 88 UNION STREET, f 

ABERDEEN. 



^ LAMPS OF EYEHY DESCRIPTION, t$\ 



S^'S!>^><^^ 



Brown's Book-Staix. 



39 



Book*%ent>in$. 



The eighth commandment does not 
apply, in the theory and practice of 
many otherwise honest and respectable 
people, to books and umbrellas. Lend 
an umbrella to a friend, and it is doubt- 
ful if you will ever see it again. But the 
life of an umbrella is very brief at the 
best, and if you succeed in keeping it 
for a twelvemonth it will probably be 
worn out. Some wise folk keep old 
umbrellas for the especial purpose of 
lending them, and the loss of an old 
umbrella is of little moment. Books, on 
the other hand, if they are worthy of the 
name, often increase in value as they 
increase in age, and the loss of an old 
volume is a serious matter. To replace 
it may be quite impossible, and even if 
a second copy could be bought it would 
be a poor substitute for the original, 
which opened so naturally at our 
favourite passage, and perhaps contained 
pencilled notes and references the results 
of careful reading and study. The lost 
book may have been one volume of a 
set, and now the place that knew it once 
knows it no more ; the vacant space on 
the shelf sadly reminds us of our own 
folly and the forgetfulness of our friend. 
We cannot, it may be, remember who 
borrowed the missing volume, and our 
inquiries of likely persons are unsuccess- 
ful. They all repudiate the suggestion 
that they can have been so careless as to 
have borrowed a book and failed to 
return it, and some of them consider the 
suggestion as almost an affront. We 
apologise, and submit to the loss with an 
inward resolve never to be again guilty 
of lending a book. But such excellent 
resolutions are more easily made than 
kept. In a moment of weakness we take 
down from our shelves some favourite 
author or rare edition to point out to a 
visitor a fine passage or a curious note. 
Our friend takes up the book, and is so 
much interested that he begs to be 
allowed to carry it home for a day or 
two. We cannot well refuse the request, 
but to prevent the possibility of loss we 



make a memorandum of the transaction. 
Alas for the vanity of the best inten- 
tions ! Our memorandum gets displaced, 
or, if kept, it may be the borrower 
removes to a distance, or our intimacy 
with him ceases. To write and demand 
the return of the borrowed volume is 
impossible without renewing some un- 
pleasant discussion, or re-opening a 
quarrel which had better be allowed to 
rest. In any case, the result is the 
same. The book is lost to us for ever. — 
Globe. 

"B (Birl of tbe zrowm" 

(Ann of Oxford Street, and De Quincey.) 



How often I've mourned o'er De Quincey's lot 

When wandering in London town, 
When helpless and hopeless, without home or spot 

Which the wand'rer could then call his own ; 
When roaming the streets and haunting the park, 

While all things seemed on him to frown, 
When, fainting with hunger and all prospects dark, 

He was saved by a "girl of the town." 



Aye, a girl of the town ! Oh, pitiful case ! 

Who had only seen sixteen years, 
Whose tale could be read in the young, tender face, 

Though wasted, oft streaming with tears ; 
Her innocence blighted, her heart had not lost 

True pity for him in his sorrow — 
She spent her last sixpence for him without boast, 

And without "taking heed for to-morrow." 

Oh, Oxford Street Ann ! though ruined by man, 

Now for ever you're crowned with glory, 
For this record of you, in words warm and true, 

De Quincey has put into story ; 
And when time is old the tale shall be told 

How you in your tender est pity — 
In your pitiful case relieved his distress 

When fainting he fell in the city. 

G. Q. 



4Q 



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Respectfully invites Inspection to his Stock of 

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Reasonable Prices & Good Work 

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Office of " Scottish Notes and Queries" 



/Ifcafce Wouv Will 

Forms for making a WILL with directions, 
3d, each, post free 3id. 



A. BROfI, & CO., 

77 UNION STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stalx. 



4i 






Fact arvd Fictiorx. 



" We cannot believe that toil is the one good object 
of humanity, or that the old Hebrews were utterly- 
wrong who accounted it a doom." — Spectator. 



The cheap edition of William Black's Novels has been 
even more successful than we expected it to be. The 
first two volumes of the series — viz., " A Daughter of 
Heth " and " The Strange Adventures of a Phaeton " — 
are going very well, but we anticipate a much larger de- 
mand for this month's volume, "The Princess of 
Thule," which is the most popular of his novels. 
We doubt not tbe Sassenach when he visits the north 
this summer will take advantage of the reduction in 
price, and buy this charming romance of the Highlands 
in large numbers. 



Many of our friends have expressed a wish to have 
a copy of the Portrait of Provost Brown which appear- 
ed in our last number. We therefore had a small number 
struck off on superior paper, copies of which may be 
had at threepence each. 



" If you want to know the time ask a Policeman ? " 
but if you want to know about books — especially old 
books — ask a bookseller. We saw the other day in the 
columns of a local contemporary, a letter from a cor- 
respondent asking where a copy of John Milne of Glen- 
livet's Poems could be got, and stating that he had tried 
all the old men in the country-side for a copy without 
success. If instead of giving himself and others so 
much trouble he had sent a post card to A. Brown & 
Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen, or to any Aberdeen 
Bookseller, he would have got the information at once, 
and probably the book. Verb. sap. 



Coincident with the notice in our present number of 
the use by Alexander Brown, of Homer's Head, as a 
sign, we observe in the Publishers' Circular the first 
of a series of articles on "Booksellers Signs." Itseem3 
that Booksellers and Publishers were the last, 
with the exception of the Tavern-keepers, to give 
up the old signs. The alphabetical list of signs does 
not extend to H so that we cannot yet tell which of the 
London Publishers traded like our founder under the 
patronage of Homer. In the list given we observe two 
signs which are familiar. The "Bible and Sun" used 
by J. Newberry, Goldsmith's publisher, and still to be 



found on the publications of Messrs Griffith, Farran & 
Co., the successors to J. Newberry. The other is the 
" Bible and Crown " the sign of the Rivingtons. This 
latter will probably now disappear as the business of 
the Rivingtons was recently bought by the Longmans. 
" The Ship " the sign of the Longmans still appears 
on many of their books, and its memory is kept fresh 
by Mr. Andrew Lang who contributes monthly to 
Longman's Magazine a series of notes under the title 
" At the sign of the ship." 



The shareholders of Messrs. Cassell & Co., Limited, 
held their Annual General Meeting the other day, when 
the Chairman of the Company announced that the 
profits of the year amounted to £38,466, and proposed 
that the dividend should be at the rate of 10 per cent. 
So it would seem that a living can still be made in the 
publishing business. It is only the poor retail book- 
seller, who has to give away all his profits in 3d. off the 
Is. discounts to the public, and has to depend upon the 
scraps that are left for a precarious living. 



Apropos of living, someone calls attention to the 
amounts left by Mr. J. K. Stephen, the Poet, and Mr. 
J. Rickett, Coal Merchant, who both died lately. The 
Coal Merchant left £307,000, the Poet £87 12s. lid. 
Another instance of the success of the middleman. 



Which reminds us of a story we read some time ago 
of a prococious Yankee child who was being spanked by 
his father and called out to his grandfather who was 
standing beside, " Oh, Grand-pa, do remove the super- 
flous middleman " ! 



On the recommendation of Sir Frederick Leighton 
who says, " We have been using The Leighton Pencil 
with the result that we have been in a state of blissful 
serenity for a month. Scarcely anything can disturb 
the equanimity of a person who uses this pencil, it works 
so smoothly. We make this known because we found the 
following in the columns of a contemporary under the 
heading, " Lead Pencils and Temper." 



"Breathes there a man amongst literary paper- 
scratchers or draughtsmen with temper so sweetly long- 
suffering and angelic under trouble as never to himself 
hath said, ' O, curse this brittle pencil lead ?' If such 
there be, he may pass on, being in no need of comfort. 
But to the vast majority of those who have to sharpen 
and wield those instruments I believe the following 
recipe for softening and saving lead pencils — and big 
D's — will be welcome: — Take a quantity — "a gross," 
the recipe says, but for individual scribes that is grossly 
exaggerated — and place them in a jar of linseed oil. 
Allow them to remain in soak until^the oil thoroughly 
permeates every particle of the wood and lead. This 



42 



Brown' vS Book-Stall. 



has the effect of softening the material, at the same 
time making it tough and durable. Under this treat- 
ment an ordinary — not to say cheap— pencil can be used 
twice as long as usual." 



This recipe we consider a waste of time and linseed 
oil. To those who cannot or think they cannot afford 
to buy The Leiyhton Pencil but who want a good pencil 
cheap, we would say "Try our pencils at 6|d per doz." 
Though the price is low the lead is the quality of an 
ordinary 2d. pencil, so there will be no necessity of 
experimenting with the linseed oil receipe. Come early, 
because though we got 4000 they are going fast. 



We believe books were first bound in cloth in 1822. 



The first edition of "The Little Minister " at 7s. 6d. 
(cash price 5s. 8d.) is sold out and a second edition is to 
be ready this week. 



U/PHV5ED C0 P ies °f Nt) - 1 °f "-Brown's Bookstall." 
We would be obliged if anyone having 
got a copy of No. 1 and not wishing to keep it ; would 
take the trouble to return it, as a number of our 
friends wish to get copies, and we are unable to supply 
them. 



1Re\>. George Gtlfillan ano bis 
parrot 



The following anecdote comes to us from Dundee, 
and so far as we are aware has not previously appeared 
in print. On one occasion the Rev. Geo. Gilfillan 
bought a parrot which was said to talk, and after he 
got his purchase home, he used every means he could 
think of to draw the bird into conversation, but with- 
out success. On questioning the seller about the 
matter he was told to rattle the bars of the cage with 
his finger, and, if that failed, to take hold of the perch 
and shake up the bird a little. The former means, 
when tried, proved unavailing ; but when he shook the 
perch, the parrot at once exclaimed "Steady, ye deevil, 
or you'll cowp me ! " 





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For holding Letters, Accounts, Invoices, 
or Papers of any kind. 

Holds with an iron grip. 

Warranted to suspend 6 pounds. 

Price Threepence Each. 



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43 




flNortable ffiooh Shelves. o™ ***,**»* *■*«** 

\w%S ^^ * and packed in small compass 



The " Student's " Book Shelf. 
Polished Light Oak Colour. 
Size, 1 6 inches high by 20 
inches long, with 2 Shelves 



The " CoTTAGE " Book Shelf with 
3 Shelves. 22 by 22 inches. 
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Style of Illustration above. 



I- 



10/6 



The "College" Book Shelf, 
with 3 Shelves. 28^ by 25 
inches. Polished Dark Oak 
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The "Referee" Book Shelf, 
with 4 Shelves. 39 by 30 
inches. Polished Dark Oak 
Colour. Style as above. 



18/(5 



44 Brown's Book-Staix. 









m %k. ut*xx«i 

Cabinet /Iftakers anb XUpbolstecers, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

SKoW Rooms at 



257 UJNIOJM SJREEJ, 

and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and Upholstery Goods. 



J\\<Z Gabir\et FumiKire made in their own Workshop will 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



Tkeir NeW Garpet 5aloor\ is stocked with < he . , 

V V r best makes ot 

British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums, 

Mattings, Rugs, &c. Curtains 
•$H§r and Upholstery Materials. 



|"lolburr\ Gabirvet Works are now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material and Workmanship. 



Jfirst H)eliv>en> of Spring lP>urcbases< 

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CHOICE SELECTION OF 

MILLINERY, 

MANTLES, 

and DRESSES. 

AJV EARLY VISIT RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED. 



ROBERT HENDERSON, 

33 & 35 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 



WE GAWT AFFORD TO GIVE AWAY 

NOTEPAPER 



For NOTHING : 

But we do Supply One Pound of CLUB VELLUM NOTEPAPER 
for 6j^d., and One Hundred Envelopes to Match for 6^d. 



CALL AND SEE IT OR WRITE FOR A SAMPLE. 



Jk. BROWN & GO., Stationers, 77 Ur\ior\ St., 

ABEBDEEN". 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN, 



The BON-ACCORD SHIRT, 

NEWEST DESIGNS 

IN 

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SUITS, 

£3 3s. 

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jfinest IRange 



OF 



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Aberdeen : James Leatham, Printer, 15 St. Nicholas Street. 




No. 4. 



APRIL. 



1892. 




IN WHICH IS NOW MERGED 



THE SCOTTISH PROVINCIAL ASSUME CO. 



FIRE, LIFE, AND ANNUITIES. 



Incoiporated by ffioyal Charter a?id Special Acts of 'Parliament. 

Total Assets exceed ^10,000,000. 

The Funds of the Life Department are not liable for obligations under the 
Fire Department, nor are the Funds of the Fire Department liable for obligations 
under the Life Department. In this Company, therefore, the Investments for the 
Life Department are kept entirely separate from those of the Fire Department, as 
set forth in the Balance Sheet. 



Income ior 1890, 



^2,487,839, 



Bberoeen :Boarfc- 



GEORGE COLLIE, Esq., Advocate. 
JAMES F. LUMSDEN, Esq., Advocate. 
ALEX. M. OGSTON, Esq. of Akdoe. 



WILLIAM YEATS, Esq. of Auquhakney. 
JOHN WHYTE, Esq., Advocate. 
JOHN COOK, Esq., Banker. 



■ Local Manager— GEORGE W. W. BARCLAY. 
Fire Superintendent— -D . B. MILNE. 

Prospectuses and full information as to several important features recently introduced can be obtained at the 

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CHIEF OFFICES: 

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Aberdeen Office: 91 UNION STREET. 






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No. 4. 



APRIL. 



1892. 



Brown's Bberbeen J8ooft*StalL 



No. IV. 




THE eighteenth century, 
which Dr. Arnold of 
Rugby said was " the 
seed-time of modern Europe," was draw- 
ing to a close; very slowly, according 
to the ideas of the young, but far too 
rapidly in those of the old. In popular 
language, it was dying, but certainly 
neither from old age nor decrepitude ; 
for the flowers bloomed as brightly and 
the birds sang as joyously as ever they 
had done. Its death was entirely artifi- 
cial, and not natural, for in its later 
years there were flashes of energy, of 
light and leading, in it not at all like 
those of the expiring taper, but more 
resembling the rosy tints of light which, 
in the early morning, kiss the snowy 
mountain peaks, before they steal down 
their sides and flood with sunshine and 
gladness the lowly valleys. Old ideas 



and forms of an antiquated, worn-out 
regime were disappearing in the new 
light, and young Expectation stood on 
tip-toe, to watch with eager gaze the 
dawn of a new and brighter era, which 
began in 1785. 

Aspirations after a higher liberty and 
a greater freedom arose all over Scotland 
at this time, and got vent in the Conven- 
tion of Royal Burghs. And the citizens 
of Aberdeen, like " children crying in 
the night," were not behind those of 
the other burghs in " crying for the 
light." 

■ In many a fierce battle, in deed and 
diplomacy, as the English found to their 
cost, the Scottish oatmeal made stalwart 
men, and the Shorter Catechism made 
acute minds ; so it came to pass that, 
between these and by their help, Milton's 
knotty subjects of " fate, free-will, and 
foreknowledge," were easily and satisfac- 
torily settled by every Scotchman for 
himself, notwithstanding the continual 
difficulty there was in getting other 
people to agree with him. 

John Ewen and his like-minded cit- 
izens were baffled in their attempts to 
get municipal reform by the want of 
Home Rule, and by the stupid prefer- 
ence of the English for another diet 
than oatmeal and the Catechism, com- 
piled, as the Cockney thought, by that 
wonderful man "Shorter," who, he 
supposed, was related to some one 
" Knocks," who largely figured in their 
national history. (And that he did). 
That there could possibly be a longer 
or a " larger " Catechism was to the 



4 6 Brown's Book-Stall. 






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47 



Cockney both incredible and prepos- 
terous. Had the English been only 
properly fed and "catecheesed" like 
Scotchmen, there can be little doubt but 
that the Reform Bill of 1785 would have 
passed in forty weeks, instead of being 
deferred for forty years, while all that 
time Scotchmen had to wander in the 
wilderness. When Fletcher of Saltoun 
said " Give me the making of a nation's 
ballads and I care not who makes their 
laws," he must have forgot the Shorter 
Catechism. So much depends on the 
feeding of body and training of mind ! 

But such was the ferment among the 
citizens at this time, that an agitation for 
reform of some kind or other was necess- 
ary as an outlet for the ebullition ; and, 
luckily, it was directed towards a very 
much needed improvement of the sani- 
tary condition of the city. And the 
" light and leading" took the material, 
practical, and sensible form of more 
street lamps, an extension of the water- 
pipes, and a crusade in favour of cleanli- 
ness. 

The toon had then but ten short streets, 
To ilka hoose there was a yaird — 

behind, and a midden in front. Outside 
stairs led to the upper floors of the 
houses, from the top of which slop-pails 
were emptied on the street, without even 
the warning cry of "Gardez-vous" being 
uttered. Castle Street was the only flat 
place in the city ; for it then consisted of 
a series of narrow, crooked, and sloping 
streets, generally so steep in their de- 
clivities that, had they been paved, it 
might have been said that " every stone 
was six inches lower than its neighbour," 
— a state of matters which outrivalled 
"the pavement of the bottomless pit." 
But this steepness of streets helped its 
salubrity, for it drained the middens and 
kept the gutters from becoming stag- 
nant. The main sewer of the town 
was the open burn from the L,och, 
which, after receiving the drainage of 
the Gallowgate, was carried across the 
Upperkirkgate, and, after solidly driving 
the Flour and Malt Mills, fell into the 
tide near the old Trinity Hall. Within 
the memory of many still alive, the har- 



bour was at low tide a bed of filthy mud, 
reeking with pestilential miasma, and at 
high tide, a mass of floating garbage, the 
water surface glowing with all the colours 
of the rainbow, arising from the then 
waste coal-tar of the gas works, now 
such a source of wealth. 

At Gilcomston, in 1756, there was but 
a single farm-house where now 

Five hunder weel-fill't hooses stan'; 

and the Denburn was then a good speci- 
men of the lifiest, bonniest thing on 
earth — the frequent and just theme of 
Ruskin's high admiration — a clear, caller, 
sparkling Scottish burnie, fresh from the 
hills and from high heaven itself. Then 
the blithe youngsters of the braif toon 
roamed along its verdant banks, from its 
junction with the Dee, past the Doo'cot 
brae and the Corbie heugh, as far up as 
Carden's haugh ; bird-nesting, flower- 
gathering, fishing for minnows or small 
trout, or picnicing on its banks; drank 
refreshing draughts from its three cele- 
brated springs, of which "Callirhoe" 
or the Well of Spa was the most cele- 
brated, but each having special virtues 
of its own, and when combined with each 
other and the fresh air, equal in virtue 
to a whole infirmary in the opinion of a 
great many citizens. Where ? Ah where 
are the springs now ? 

By 1800, great changes had taken place. 
Gilcomston had grown into a village with 
a big church of its own, built by itself 
and for itself; and although both the 
Windmill Brae and the Hardgate were 
lined with houses, the Denburn was still 
considered beyond the walls, and the 
dividing line between town and country. 
Across it, the main south road, winding 
in Roman fashion over hight and ho we 
from the Bridge of Dee, was carried by 
the Bow Brig, a comparatively modern 
structure, and considered so "elegant" 
that it has been preserved in Union 
Terrace Gardens ever since. But, his- 
torically, the older structure was much 
more important. It formed one of the/ 
ports of the city so far back as the time 
when King William had his palace in 
the buildings which he gave to the 



4 8 



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Private Gentlemen & Business Firms 

Who look to excellence and style in their 

WRITING PAPER, 



Should adopt this beautiful paper. 
It is made with 



IMPERIAL GLAZED OR PLAIN SURFACE, 

PARCHM 



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And is an agreeable and high-class paper 
at an ECONOMICAL PRICE. 



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To be had from all dNJ> 

ABERDEEN BOOKSELLERS 5 STATIONERS. 



John Heaths Pens 




OFFICIAL PEN F.M.B S/ s F. M. B., 2/6 

Sample Box (24 kinds) and List, 7 stamps, BIRMINGHAM. 



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STATIONERS, 

77. Union Street. ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



49 



monks of the "Holy Trinitie," and which 
was adjacent to the monastery of the 
Carmelite Friars, both in the immediate 
neighbourhood. Over the old bridge, 
Wallace, and Bruce, King James, and 
Queen Mary, and other sovereigns 
entered the city in gallant pageantry, 
celebrated by William Dunbar. Over it 
streamed the armed citizens 

When Cavalier and Covenanter, 
Cromwell men and Gerry lairds, 
Took up by turns the sticks to daunt her 
An' her braif auld burgher gairds ; 

and over it in wild confusion they rushed 
when Montrose swept them before him. 

Up to the close of last century, the 
Bow Brig was the main approach to the 
city, and near it, in the Green, the 
founder of the family of the Haddens, 
so long the magnates of the town, had 
his residence, in order that he might, 
at the bridge, meet his customers, the 
country wives, who sold their woven 
stockings to him. 

It is related of Lord Medwyn, who 
came on circuit here, before and after 
Union Bridge was built, that he said 
"he had come to Aberdeen when it was 
a city without an entrance, but that 
recently it was an entrance without a 
city." Could he now revisit this sublun- 
ary scene, even as a ghost at a "Midnicht 
Meetin', with dear departed William 
Forsyth as the reporter, we might learn, 
in fitting terms, what he would now say 
of " the silver city by the sea ; " for has 
not the reporter sung thus : — 

Whaur flowed the tide by Tarnty Mill, 

The iron horse has noo his sta', 
Frae Justice Port to Windmill hill 

Wis wavin' green wi' yairdens a'. 
The Woo'man hill wis ae green knowe, 

An' up the Denburn's bonny bank, 
The playgreen lay in Gilcom's howe, 

The scene o' mony a merry prank. 

But noo [he's ta'en] awa', awa', 

And there is change and mair than change — 

to the lasting loss of every lover of 
genius and good fellowship. 

Failing, in the meantime, to reform the 
Town Council by act of Parliament, the 
long-headed citizens of that day wisely 



determined to try and reform themselves. 
And a proposal to get a Police Bill, and 
a regular assessment of the inhabitants 
for this, was therefore mooted, and gave 
vent and opportunity for keen discussion 
in private, and, what was much more im- 
portant, in ' the public press ; for then 
seems to have begun that public dis- 
cussion of civic affairs which has gone 
on ever increasing since. 

The proposed Bill was attacked and 
defended in prose and verse, and, as 
specimens of the latter, two acrostics 
are here given, in one of which the 
hand of Mr. Brown's brother, William, 
(the author of " Look before ye Loup,") 
may not unreasonably be suspected. 

Proposing many comforts to supply, 

On all hands wish'd and pray'd for. Here come I ! 

Led solely by my wishes to do good, 

•I ask no more, but to be understood, 

Canvassed with freedom, candidly surveyed, 

Examined fairly, faults and merits weighed. 

But I'm rejected, spurned, unheard, condemned, 
Insulted, bark'd at, buffetted, and maimed ; 
Like a poor dog, judged mad because a stranger 
Like him, from Ignorance, comes all my danger. 
Aberdeen Journal, 6th June, 1791. 

Next week the following appeared : — 

Pack up your awls, ye black warl's wunner ! 
Or I'll come o'er your snout a lunner ; 
Let who will dare to contradic' it, 
I'll gar you march — or " deil be licket : " — 
Come ye to lade's wi' mair new taxes, 
Elastic as your conscience raxes ? 

By George ! if ever ye be seen 
In oor guid toon o' Aberdeen, 
Lown leuking Rogue ! I'll gie my aith 
Like warlock, ye sail suffer death ! 

If all letters to the editor were as brief, 
pithy, and pointed as these, they would 
command attention ; and always provided 
they were written on one side of the 
paper, there would be fewer of them 
thrown into the waste basket, and it is 
just possible that, a hundred years after, 
some queer old antiquarian might take a 
fancy to republish them. 

The Police Bill passed into an Act in 
1795. Like the Reform Bill, it was not 
an official, but a citizens' measure, and so 
democratic ; and as it gave a fairly elected 
representative board, it worked well, and 



5° 



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Jelegrams— "LORIMER, BOOTMAKER, ABERDEEN. 



James Lorimer & Son, 

Boot & Shoe Saloons, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 

157 Union Street, Aberdeen, 



LJAVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, 

including every variety of 

iBoots, |5hoes, and $51i£{3cr& 

For Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 

In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly on hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shooting, Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ©rfcers of E\>et£ Description /Ifcafce to /Measure. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



51 



in its results it so approved itself, that 
the usual impatience of increased tax- 
ation was entirely stilled, and it was the 
origin of all the improvements which 
have made Aberdeen what it now is. 

Here it may be said as an apology for 
the rambling, fragmentary character of 
these sketches, that they are neither in- 
tended for a history- nor a biography, but 
simply as a rope to hang thrums on (the 
said thrums being in themselves of no 
value, yet serving to tie things together), 
and, therefore, it is not necessary to give 
a detailed account of the inception of the 
greatest improvement ever carried out in 
the city — the opening up of Union Street 
and King Street. For is not this all 
related in hard, cold, dry-as-dust style 
in Kennedy's Annals, vol. I., 440-457 ? 
But as this improvement is such an 
important factor in making Aberdeen 
what it is to-day, some slight notice of 
it, — especially if it contains anything 
new to some readers, may be tolerated. 



LORD MA CAUL AY AND HLS NIECE, 
ALICE TREVELYAN. 



In his domestic relations, as son, brother, or uncle, 
Macaulay comes out of what is a crucible to most 
men, untarnished by a flaw. How very beautiful is 
that scene of his with his child-niece, Alice, to whom 
he had posted a beautiful valentine, which cost a 
guinea, and with which she was in raptures, of course — 
and little wonder! "She begged quite pathetically" 
(think of this at her age) "to be told the truth 
about it when we were alone together " (the prudent 
little soul !). She said "I am going to be very serious" 
(the dear little divine !) " Down she fell on her knees, 
and lifted up her hands " (just think of it, and the 
attitude, it was serious indeed !) " Dear Uncle, do tell 
the truth to your little girl. Did you send the valentine?" 
" I did not choose to tell a lie to a child, even about 
such a trifle, — and so I owned it." A trifle ! to little 
Alice ! — upon her knees, and with uplifted hands ! 
Nay, nay ! it was no trifle to this little immortal ! 
Could any man have refused to tell the truth? A 
portrait of Lord Macaulay and his niece in this inter- 
view would be very desirable to all his admirers. 

And speaking of illustrations, brilliant as Macaulay's 
word pictures are, the whole world is waiting for an 
illustrated edition of his History. Only let the illustra- 
tions be worthy of the text, and the success of the 
edition would be unprecedented. 



Bn JEigbt Hxmrs Blofee on 
Spring poets. 



Now April wanes, and bards will sing 

Of sprouting, balmy days in store — 
At least, it always was the thing 

To welcome May in days of yore — 
To chant how nature lived again 

In grass and trees and springing flow'rs, 
The marvels wrought by sun and rain 

And slowly lengthening daylight hours ; 
Thf» lambs that frisked on green hillsides, 

The kine that lowed upon the lea, 
The lazy-lapping summer tides 

That laved the hulls of ships at sea. 

But other themes must claim my pen 

Than dalliance with the sweets of summer ; 
For I must be in bed at ten 

To rise next morn when sounds the "bummer. 
And so I hasten on to tell 

You rhyming coves how little reason 
You have to sing of lake and fell 

And all the glories of the season. 
Small matter 'tis, O bardlets all, 

To workers what the time of year is — 
'Neath sweltering sun, o'er snowy pall, 

Each day's work much the same I fear is. 

Long after five we may not lie 

In bed be't e'er so snug and cosy ; 
As six draws nigh off must we hie 

To yard or mill or workshop prosy. 
And if we've been the night before 

To see the play, or lift our leather 
At wedding-dance or other splore, 

And fain would take, in this fine weather, 
A morning's rest, a day to ramble, 

And see the things you rave about, 
O'er ditch or stile we may not scramble, 

Nor by the seaside run and shout. 

At least we may — if we can stand 

To drop our job and lose our pay ; 
But, sure, without the brass in hand 

One spends a doleful holiday. 
'Tis true we get one day in seven, 

And half-a-day before the Sunday, 
And then we seem to be in heaven 

Till t'other place we reach with Monday. 
The thrush will sing, the wild rose bloom, 

The trout sport in the shady stream ; 
But we must sweat at forge and loom, 

Must lay the stone and plant the beam. 

And so, dear boys, the thing we ask 

Is not so much that you shall babble 
Of sunlit fields, where cattle bask, 

Or waters broad, where boaters paddle — 
As that you'll tell bow common blokes 

Like me should, with our partner Sallies, 
Get oftener out to crack our jokes 

Across the hills and through the valleys ; 
How if the work that's to be done 

Had more folk helping at its doing 
We'd oftener see the summer sun, 

And health and pleasure be pursuing. 

J. L. 



The book by Sydney Webb, LL.B., and Harold 
Cox, B.A., on "The Eight Hours Day," may be had 
for 9d. cash, or post free, 1/, from A. Brown & Co., 
yy Union Street, Aberdeen. 



52 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



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Being made in 7 Sizes, it can con 
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EDINBURGH 



D68 9- 



and Office Use for a Variety of Purposes 
No. 1. " MIDGET." a few are shown below. 




y 



D61 2/- D64 3 

lames laifos. 38*6/^52 



wmjcm. 



D62 3- 



TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS 

"Portrait, LONDON 






D63 5/- 




D65 4/- 
RECEIVED PAYMENT 

>♦ <fc §♦ flatkb, 

WITH THANKS. 



D66 8/- 





No. 7 "MIDGET." 



A. BrOWn & CO., Stationers, 

jj Union Street, Aberdeen. 



CLEARANCE LIST 

OF 

Books, New and Second-hand, 

ON SALE BY 

A. BROWN & CO., Booksellers, 
77 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 



3/- and upwards. 

Martin's Eminent Divines in Aberdeen and the North, 



4/- 



5/- 



Jones & Sieveking's Pathological Anatomy 
Cunningham's Tales of the Peasantry, 3/. 
Charles Lamb's Complete Works, 5/. 
Smith's Life of Gladstone, 2 vols., 6/. 
Guthrie's Vale of Strathmore, 3/6. 
Ross's The Land of the Five Rivers, 3/. 
Blackie, J. S., Altavona, 3/. 
Scott's Round about the Islands, 4/. 
Ashton's Modern Street Ballads, 5/. 
Lang's Queensland, 3/. 
Jones' Structure of Animal Kingdom, 3/6. 
Montrose, by Lady Greville, 4/. 
Dante's Divina Commedia, 3/6. 
MacKenzie's Highland Clearances, 3/6. 
Robinson's Scripture Characters, 3/6. 
Oeuvres de Boileau, 3/6. 
McCulloch's Commercial Dictionary, 5/. 
Mitchell's Manual of Architecture, 3/. 
Griffith's Text Book of the Microscope, 4/. 
Jervise's Memorials of Angus and the Mearns, 

2 vols., 28/- for 14/. 

Castles of Aberdeenshire, Views of45 Castles, 25/. 
Chambers' History of the Rebellions, 5 vols., 10/ 
Serle's Horse Solitarise, 3/6. 
Wood's Insects at Home, 21/- for 5/. 

Insects Abroad, 21/- for 5/. 

Bible Animals, 21/- for 5/. 

Homes without Hands, 21/- for 5/. 

Jahn's Archaeologia Biblica, 5/. 

Recollections of James Lenox of New York, 6/. 

Dibdin's Library Companion, 10/6. 

Ramsay's Tea Table Miscellany, 2 vols., 8/. 

Ross's Book of Scottish Poems, 2 vols., 8/. 

Murchison's Diseases of the Liver, 3/. 

Warren's Miscellanies, 2 vols., 3/. 

Fo'c's'le Yarns, Betsy Lee, etc., 3/6 

Hume and Smollett's History of England, 

3 vols., 6/. 

The Portfolio, vols., 1877, 1878, 1879, cloth, 
gilt edges, 15/- per vol., pub. at 36/. 



1875 
1874 

1879 

1875 
1883 
1885 
1874 
1888 
1864 
1855 
1886 
1844 
1883 

1853 
1842 

1854 
1870 
1864 

1885 
1887 

1838 
1872 
1874 
1869 
1883 
1836 
1886 
1825 
1871 
1882 
1868 
1855 



1826 



At 2/6 Each. 

Taine's Notes on England. 

Curiosities of Biography, with 100 Curious 

Portraits. 
Nisbet's Caroline Bauer and the Coburgs. 
Gost wick's English Grammar, Historical and 

Analytical. 
Simpson's Parish Patches. 
Adam's Cyclopaedia of Poetical Quotations. 
Macpherson's Resurrection of Jesus Christ. 
De Omnibus Rebus. 
Shorthouse's Teacher of the Violin, etc. 
Thayer's George Washington. 
Creasy's The British Empire. 
Ewing's Revelation considered as Light. 
Book of Psalms, by Marquis of Lome. 



1872 

1845 
1885 

1878 



1867 



1883 
1861 
1873 
1877 



At 2/- Each. 

Tennyson's Queen Mary. 1875 
Foster's European Literature. 1849 
The Passion Week, by Hanna. 1866 
Landels' Young Man in the Battle of Life. 
Recreations of a Country Parson, 3rd series. 1878 
Martin's Messiah's Kingdom. 1876 
Smith's Benderloch. 1882 
Life and Labours of Andrew Reed. 1866 
Miller's Headship of Christ. 1861 
Cossa on Taxation. 1888 
Guthrie's Studies of Character. 1870 
Disraeli's Calamities and Quarrels of Authors. 1859 
Nisbet's Songs of the Temple Fathers. 1863 
Henry Kirke White's Poems, etc. 1853 
Wood's Common Objects of Microscope. 1866 
The Protector, by D'Aubigne. 1857 
Candlish's Life in a Risen Saviour. 1858 
Jackson's What to Observe. ^45 
Kay's Lives of Indian Officers — Martyn, Met- 
calfe, Burnes, Conolly, Pottinger. 1869 
Cumming's Life and Lessons of our Lord. 
Gladstone's Rome : Newest Fashions in Religion. 

1875 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



At 2/- Each. — (Continued). 

Pirie's Philosophy of the Human Mind. 1858 

Lowell's Political Essays. 1888 

Thomson's Choice of a Profession. 1857 

Moffatt's Land and Work. 1888 
Illustrated Book of English Songs. 

Tennyson's Harold. 1877 

Bonar's The Rent Veil. 1875 

Newton's Works. 1854 
Disraeli's Literary Character of Men of Genius. 1859, 

Choice Poems and Lyrics. 1862 

Hartshorne's Essentials of Medicine. 1874 

Bonar's Words, Old and New. 1866, 

At 1/6 Each. 

Stanford on Christian Work. 1879. 
Mrs. Beecher Stowe's Footsteps of the Master. 1877. 

Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette. 1872. 
James Turner, or How to reach the Masses. 1878. 

Kidd on the Eternal Sonship. 1872. 

Voyages Round the World. 1857. 

Grant of Banff's Sermons. 1859. 

Gilford's Life of Dr. Johnston. 1876. 

Walpole, by Morley. 1889. 

Burnham's Next Door. 1886. 

Winslow's Glory of Redeemer. 1855. 
Sydney Smith's Essays. 

McLeod's Days of Heaven upon Earth. 1878. 

Selss' Literature of Germany. 1880. 

Anderson's Exposure of Popery. 1878. 

Memorials of Samuel Miller. 1883. 

Tennyson's The Cup and The Falcon. 1884. 

Wallace's The Desert and the Holy Land. 1868. 

Macdonald's Food from the Far West. 1878. 

Log Cabin to White House. 1881. 

Noel's Union of Church and State. 1848. 

Thoughts on Religious Subjects. 1867. 

Society in London. 1885. 

Gilfillan's Life of Scott. 1871. 

Graham's Memoir of Dr. Macfarlane. 1876. 
Parker's Church Questions. 

Grosart's Representative Nonconformists. 1879. 

Huntington's Sermons for the People. 1877. 

Page's Advanced Geology. . 1856. 

Howitt's History of U. S. A., vol. 1. 1859. 
Wilder's People I've Smiled with. 

Memories of Seventy Years. 1884. 

Guthrie's Studies of Character. 1870. 

Australian Life and Scenery. 1876. 

Aunt Judy's Xmas Volume. 1867. 

Philip's Geology. 1855. 



At 1/6 Each. — (Continued). 

Jones' Life of Admiral Forbisher. 1878. 

Dickson's Discourses. 1857. 

Liefde's Charities of Europe, 2 vols. 1865. 

Hutchinson's Try Lapland. 1870. 

Steinmetz's Japan and her People. 1859. 

True Glory of Woman. 

Mackay's Gems of Prose. 1872. 

Butt's Christmas Roses, etc. 1877. 

Shedd's Homiletics and Pastoral Theology. 1869. 

Nicol's Geology of Scotland. 1844. 

Sydney Smith's Memoir. 

Guizot's St. Louis and Calvin. 

McLeod and Guthrie's Wind-wafted Seed. 

Beeton's Every Day Cookery. 

Wick's Organ Building. 



At I/- Each. 



Porteous' Government of Kingdom of Christ. 
Lorimer's Protestant Church of France. 
Hunter's Lady's Drive from Florence to Cher- 
bourg. 
Early Years of King David. 
Fletcher's Memoir. 
Winslow's Heaven Opened. 
Sherman's Memoir, by Henry Allon. 
Jenkin's The Captain's Cabin. 
Wightman's Arrest the Destroyer's March. 
Tennyson's Lover's Tale. 
John Stuart Mill, by Bain. 
Quilter's Is Marriage a Failure? 
Lockhart's Medical Missionary in China. 
Mill's Blues and Buffs, a Contested Election. 
Chambers' Entertaining Biography. 
Campbell on English Convict Service. 
Homo on Reading the Bible. 
Henry's Epitome of Philosophy. 
Mann's Life Problems. 
Baker, Ella, Kingscote Stories. 

— — Bertram de Drumont. 

Tales of the Borders. 

Dickens' Sketches by Boz. 

Peggy Ogilvie's Inheritance. 

Kelman's Sabbath of Scripture. 

Lady's Every-Day Book. 

Mantell's Geology of Isle of Wight. 

McGavin's Scottish Pastorate. 

Molbech's Ambrosius, a play. 

Memoir of R. Williams, by Dr. Hamilton. 

Time's Treasure of Lord Kinloch. 

Father Solon, or the Helper Helped. 



1868. 
1887. 

1873. 



1883. 
1874. 
1846. 

1864. 
1877. 
1877. 
1879. 
1882. 

1861. 

1880. 
1855. 
1884. 
1867. 
1865. 
1870. 
1888. 
1888. 



1869. 

i875- 
1847. 
1881. 
1879. 
1874. 
1865. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Baillie's Scenes of Life. 1861. 

Bentham-Ed ward's Starry Blossom. 1881. 

Mailler's Philosophy of the Bible. 1857. 

Standard of the Cross in Paris. 1867. 

Stoddart on Universal History. 1850. 

Gow's New Light through Old Windows. 1883. 

Jacque's Hope, its Lights and Shadows. 1875. 

McBumey's Ancient History. 1856. 

Gossip's History of Russia. 1880. 



At 1/- Each. — (Continued) 




At 9d. Each. — (Continued^ 


). 


Wayland's Political Economy. 


1865. 


Hamley's Fleets and Navies. 


i860. 


Ellis' Mothers of Great Men. 


1859. 


Gogerly's Early Missions in Bengal. 




Sampson's Homoeopathy. 


1848. 


Guthrie's Ragged Schools. 


i860. 


Porter's Life of Dr. Cooke. 


1871. 


Recent Operations at Rangoon. 


1852. 


Buchanan's Faith in God and Modern Atheism, 




Wray's Garton Rowley. 


1883. 


2 vols. 


1855. 


Mailler's Philosophy of the Bible. 


1857. 


Ferguson's Penalties of Greatness. 


1858. 


Miller's Nephalism the True Temperance. 


1861. 


Seton's Net with Golden Meshes. 


1881. 


McBurney's Ancient History. 


1856. 


Freemasons' Quarterly Review. 


1843. 


Sanitary Economy. 


1850. 


Memorials of Dr. Love, 2 vols. 


1857. 


Stephen's Guide to Daily Service. 


1849. 


Jenkin's Little Hodge. 


1878. 


Wightman's The Faithful Shepherd. 


1876. 


Stephen on the Romans. 


i857. 


Hillock's Hard Battles. 


1889. 


Whittle's Catholicism and the Vatican. 


1872. 






Guide to Watering Places. 

Greek Literature, by Talfourd, etc. 


1850. 


At 6d. Each. 




Wilson's Our Father in Heaven. 


1873. 






Froude's Oceana. 


1886. 


Hunter's Missions in India and Africa. 


1873. 


Blakely's Theology of Invention. 




Binney's Life and Opinions, by Hood. 


1874. 


Dr. McKerrow's Memoirs. 


1881. 


Bayne's Testimony of Christ. 


1862. 


Butler's Analogy. 


1850. 


Anderson, Christopher, Life and Letters. 


1856. 


Morgan's Life of Salvator Rosa. 


1855. 


Boston & Baine's Sermons. 


1850. 


Nicolay's Physical Geography. 


1858. 


Mitchell's Memoir of Robert Nesbit. 


1858. 


Sinclair's Popish Legends or Bible Truth. 


1856. 


Pike's Memoir and Remains. 


1855. 


Milligan and Roberts, Words of New Testament. 


1873. 


Chalmers, Dr., Moral Philosophy. 




Cecil's Stable Practice. 


1852. 


Ter-centenary of Scottish Reformation. 


i860. 


The Old Times and the New. 


1868. 


Parley's Balloon Travels. 


1857. 


Ginx's Baby. 


1871. 


Malan on Popery. 


1840. 


French on Proverbs. 


1853. 


A Young Man : his Faith, Aims, Work, etc. 




Portobello Free Church. 




Stowell on Nehemiah. 


1855. 


Stow's Training System. 


1840. 


Bonar's Prophetical Landmarks. 


i860. 


Lee's Family and its Duties. 


1863. 


Mrs. Wilson of Bombay's Memoir. 


1838. 


Muston's Israel of the Alps. 


1852. 


Temple's Daily Treasury. 


1838. 


Forty Coming Wonders, 1889 to 1901. 




Jews in Relation to the Church and the World. 


1877. 


Baker's Kingscote Essays and Poems. 


1888. 


Father Gavazzi's Orations. 


1851. 


Mather's Nor'ard of the Dogger. 


1888. 


Memoirs of Dr. Raffles. 


1865. 


Clyne's Romantic Scottish Ballads, and Lady 




Memorials of Christian Gentlewomen. 


1864. 


Wardlaw Heresy. 




Howie's Voice from Ben-Resipol. 


1858. 






Timb's Schooldays of Eminent Men. 


1858. 


At 9d. Each. 




Doddridge's Life. 

Stoughton's Prophets and Apostles. 


1852. 
1859. 






Burns' The Pastor of Kilsyth. 


i860. 


Archer, Thomas, D.D., Memoir. 


1867. 


Triumphs of Perseverance. 




Heugh, Hugh, D.D., Life by Macgiel. 




Fighting the Good Fight. 


1883. 



Memorials of Agnes E. Jones. 1872. 
The Wisdom of our Fathers — Barrow. 
Memoir and Remains of the Rev. J. D. Burns. 1869. 

Anderson's Model Women. 1874. 

Macdonald's Lessons for the Present. 1848. 

Macfarlane's Night-Lamp. 1863. 

Landel's Message of Christianity. 1856. 

Krummacher's Elijah the Tishbite. 1836. 

Philip's Rays of Light. 1871. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



At 6d. Each. — (Continued). 



Wilson's Counsels of an Invalid. 


1862. 


Hamilton's Royal Preacher. 


1851. 


Demaus' English Literature. 


i860. 


Scott's Theological Works. 


1839. 


Ingraham's Pillar of Fire. 




Taylor's Sunday School Photographs. 


1867. 


More's Cselebs in search of a Wife. 


1837. 


The Gospels as a Single Narrative. Aberdeen 




King on the Eldership. 




Riddle's Scripture History. 


1859 


Knox's Select Writings. 


1845 


Begg on Popery. 


1852 


James' Christian Professor. 


1857 


Pastoral Poems. 


1774 



At 6d. Each. — (Continued). 



Aberdeen, 1834. 
Aberdeen, 1838. 
Aberdeen, 1830. 
Aberdeen, 1838. 

1855. 
Aberdeen, 1872. 

1866. 



Stuart's Divinity of Christ. 
Penman's Memoir. 
Brown's Memoir by Penman. 
Fragrance from Faded Flowers. 
Irving's Hall of Shades. 
Davidson's Literary Remains. 
Adlington's Principles of Music. 
Winchester's White Lady of Berlin Castle. 

Aberdeen, 1875. 
Hill on Important Subjects. Aberdeen, 1831. 

Psalm Tunes arranged for West Church, Aberdeen. 

1839. 
An Afternoon's Walk. Aberdeen, 1862. 

Grant's Notes on Schools and Colleges in America. 

Aberdeen, 187 1. 



A. Brown & Co.'s Publications. 



CraigTlam and its Ministers: The Rev. William Brown and the Rev. Patrick Robertson. 
By George Walker. Second Edition, with Corrections and Additions. 6d. 

The Goodwife at Home: in metre, illustrating the Dialect of Aberdeenshire; with a 
Glossary. Third Edition. Crown 8vo, 3d. 

Aberdoniana: Footdee in the Last Century. By the Author of "Goodwife at Home." 2d. 

Ajax, His Speech to the Grecian Knabs. From Ovid's Metam, Lib. XIII. Attempted 
in Broad Buchans by R. F., Gent., to which is added a Journal to Portsmouth and a 
Shop Bill, in the same Dialect, with Key, 4d. 

Am at the Flail. (A Sequel to John o' Arnha'.) By the Author of "Ajax," &c. 3d. 

Metrical Effusions on a Variety of Subjects. By Ewen MacLachlan, Grammar 

School, Old Aberdeen. 12 mo, 2s. 

Amusements of Leisure Hours, or Poetical Pieces, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. 
By the Rev. John Skinner, Longside ("Tullochgorum"). Scarce, 2s. 

Records Of the Parish Of Ellon. By Thomas Mair, Kermuck, Ellon. 8vo, cloth, 5s. 

Poems and Songs, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, and on Subjects of Local Interest. By 
Alexander Robb, Aberdeen. 1 21x10, cloth, is. 6d. 

Flights of Fancy and Lays of Bon- Accord. By William Cadenhead. i2mo, 
cloth, 4s. 

The Romantic Scottish Ballads, and the Lady Wardlaw Heresy. By Norval 
Clyne. 8vo, is. 

Works of Fiction : their Use and Abuse. By Rev. Henry Angus. 6d. 

An Epitome of the History of Philosophy. By C. S. Henry, D.D. i2mo, cloth, 2s. 

Elements of Political Economy. By Francis Wayland, D.D. 12 mo, cloth, is. 

The Sabbath Question. A Tract for the Times. By the Rev. John Milner. 6d. 






Brown's Book-Stall. 



53 



Mark Your Uxinen w k TH Rubber ff tamfr, 

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These Stamps are fitted up in a neat box with a Pad, and with a supply of either Red, Green, Violet, or Indelible Mark- 
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Prices for Straight Line Stamps not longer than about 2 inches, 1/6, by post, 3d. extra. 
2 133 



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108 



C^enerat tj/i 



zanam. 



115 



Margaret Flochhart. 

80 



Ij-Jifltattt %mx\ ^hfaxnu 

25 

SIB HENHY JAMES, 

13 

HENRY KENNEDY 

134 

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124 

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54 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Q liphant, Anderson, & Fgggiegi 






^x^lnnoaneements.K^x, 



Crozvn 8vo, cloth extra, with Frontispiece, price is. 6d. 

Uniform with the "Ayres of Studleigh." 
Ring in the True : A Story of Transition Times in 
Village Life. By Ella Stone. 

Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with numerous Illustrations, 
price 2s. 6d. 
Uniform with " The Stronger Will." 
Falconer of Falconhurst. By Evelyn Everett- 
Green. 
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, price 2s. 
Uniform with "Molly." 
The Wooing of Christabel. By Mrs. Elizabeth 
Neal. 
Crown 8vo, cloth, beautifully Illustrated and bound, 
price is. 6d. 
A Pair of Pickles. By Evelyn Everett-Green. 

Crown 8\o, cloth, neat, price 4s. 6d. nett. 
Wimpleburn: or, Village Sketches, and Other 
Poems. By James Milligan, Author of 
"Aphorisms, Maxims, and Short Sentences." 

Small Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, price is. 
Uniform with "Milestones," "The Red Thread of 
Honour," &c. 
The Story of Tatters. By Hermione. 

THREE NEW VOLUMES OF POPULAR SHILLING SERIES. 

Small Crozvn 8vo, paper cover, is. ; cloth extra, is. 6d., 

zvith Frontispiece. 
A Vain Sacrifice. By Mrs. Jessie K. Lawson. 
In Rosby Village. By Mary Hampden. 
Millicent's Mistake. By Sarah Selina Hamer. 

NEW EDITIONS. 

Imperial 2$mo, paper cover, white and gold, 6d. ; 
cloth, gilt edges, is. 
Visions. By Mrs. A. R. Simpson. 

Small Crown 8vo, cloth, price t>s. 6d. 
Hinduism and Christianity. By Rev. John 
Robson, D.U. 

Small Crown 8vo, cloth, price is. 

Uniform with Bunyan's " Grace Abounding." 

A Call to the Unconverted. By Richard Baxter. 

Small Crown 8vo, cloth, with Portrait, &>c, price 2s. 

Thomas Chalmers. A Biographical Study. By 

James Dodds. 



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@ld Prints. 



Billing's Engraving of Bedroom in Craigievar Castle. 

Hall in do., 

showing very fine roof. 
Hay's View of Market Street, poor copy, folio, 6d. 

1840. 

North of Scotland Bank, poor copy, 

folio, 1/. 1840. 

King's College, folio, 2/6. 1840. 

The Cross, with Group of the Spires 

and Towers of the City, folio, 6d. 
1840. 
View of the Rocks near Slains Castle, by M. Bouquet, 
folio, 6d. 

Granite Quarries, Peterhead, by S. Reid, 

folio, 6d. 
Old Engraving of Aberdeen about 200 years ago, fine 
impression, folio, 3/6. ? 1680. 

Lithograph of Statue of Prince Albert, with Elegy, 

4to, 6d. 

Drum Castle, folio, 6d. 

Old Engraving of St. Machar Cathedral, 4d. ; do., 6d.; 
do., 6d. 

Dunnottar Castle, 3d. 

3 different, at 6d. 

each. 

Aberdeen, 3d. 181 1. 

6d. 1842. 

from above Chain Bridge, 6d. 

the Light-House, Aberdeen, 6d. 

Peterhead, 6d. 

the Bullers of Buchan, 6d. 

the Cross, Aberdeen, 3d. 

the Aberdeen Bank, Castle Street, 3d. 

Leslie House, 1/. 

Wallace Nook, 4to, 1/6. 1801. 

folio, proof, 2/. 

Coloured Lithograph of Invery on the Feugh, the seat 

of H. Lumsden, Esq. of Tilwhilly, poor copy, 6d. 
Engraved Portrait of Admiral Lord Keith, 1/. 

John Leslie, fine engraving but 

poor state, 1/. 

Portrait of Duke of Gordon, by A. Robertson, 1/. 

1836. 
Lithograph Portrait of William Thorn, the Inverurie 

Poet, 1/6. 
Mezzotint Portrait of Provost Hadden, folio, proof, 

3/6. 
Kitchen's Map of Scotland, 1/6. 
Portrait of Provost Brown, 3d. 

Captain Barclay performing the great feat 

of walking 1000 miles in 1000 hours, 6d. 

Rev. John Cumming, 6d. 

by Kaye, of Lord Gardenston, 6d. 

of Isobel Walker of Daviot, aged 112, 6d. 

A. Brown & Co., Booksellers, 
yy Union Street, Abereen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



55 



IRboMum Sifcus, 




Those who require an inter- 
pretation of the title we give 
our Wayside Notes this month 
will find it in the following 
anecdote. An enterprising 
florist in a certain English 
county town introduced a 
new flower under the name 
of Rhodium Sidus which 
gained considerable popular- 
$»\ ity f° r personal and table de- 
AV coration. One day it came 
under the notice of a botan- 
ist, who recognising it as a 
weed, asked the florist where 
it got the name he gave it. 
"Well" said the florist "I found the plant at the 
roadside, and as I did not know it, I just called it 
Rhodium Sidus." 

"The minor poet is a nuisance, a vain, discontented 
bore. He ought to be suppressed, and his verses used 
to light pipes, withal." Notwithstanding this dictum 
of the Daily News there are some very charming 
verses to be found in the "Book of the Rhymers' Club," 
a limited number of which have just been published at 
5/- net. It is a nice little volume and will doubtless 
soon become an object of pursuit for the book-hunter. 

Another book which it would behove the book- 
hunter to secure early is Whymper's "Travels amongst 
the Great Andes of the Equator." This handsome 
volume is facile princeps among the publications of 
this season, and no wonder, considering that it has 
been in preparation for eleven years. Moreover few 
books are produced with the same advantages, for not 
only is Mr. Whymper a daring mountaineer and the 
describer of his own adventures, but he is one of the 
most celebrated wood engravers. Of his skill in 
illustration the present volume is a notable example. 
The price is 21/- net, and those who wish a good book 
and a good bargain will make sure of a copy. The 
"Scrambles amongst the Alps" published about 
twenty years ago by the same author has long since 
gone up to three times its original price. 



Another book that ought not to be overlooked by 
those who take pleasure in good books, is the new 
volume of essays by Robert Louis Stevenson, "Across 
the Plains," 4/6 cash. 



Taken in connection with the severe weather of the 
present spring, Sir Robert S. Ball's article in Fort- 
nightly Review for April is dismal reading. After 
saying that the coal of England will probably only last 
a century or two he goes on — "It is a noteworthy fact 
that the possibility of the continued existence of the 
human race depends fundamentaly upon the question 
of heat. If heat, or what is equivalent to heat, does 
not last, then man cannot last either." According to 
Sir Robert it seems that the sun has already dissipated 
about four fifths of the energy with which it may have 



been originally endowed, and it cannot now hold out 
for 10,000,000 years. This is a bad look-out and the 
worst is that there does not appear to be any remedy. 
For "neither from the heavens above, nor from the 
earth beneath does it seem possible to discover any 
rescue for the human race from the inevitable end." 



However notwithstanding the bad weather and the 
likelihood of the sun being used up in less than 
10,000,000 years, the summer will soon be here, and 
with it the holidays. And those on pleasure bent will 
be glad to know that there is no lack of new novels to 
provide them with light reading. Amongst the new 3/6 
hovels (cash 2/8) lately to hand we have that delightful 
story, "In a Steamer Chair," by Luke Sharp, reprinted 
with about half-a-dozen others in one volume. "St. 
Katherine by the Tower," a welcome contribution by 
Walter Besant. We can recommend "Dumaresq's 
Daughter," by Grant Allen, and "Miss Maxwell's 
Affections," by Richard Pryce is well spoken of. In 
the way of adventure there is "The Fossicker, a 
Romance of Mashonaland," by Ernest Glanville ; and 
"Snap, a Legend of the Lone Mountain," by G. 
Phillipps-Wolley, which, unless the illustrations belie 
the text, ought to be rather exciting reading. 



Amongst the 2/- Novels (cash price, 1/6), which 
have appeared lately "The Bishop's Bible," by 
Christie Murray and Henry Herman is one of the 
best. Hawley Smart writes "Without Love or 
Licence," and Ouida comes to the front with "Guilde- 
roy," a good Scotch title that ought to make it sell. 
A South African story "The Lost Heiress," by 
Ernest Glanville is said to be good. Then there are 
"My Shipmate Louise," by W. Clark Russell ; 
"Zeph, a Circus Story," by George R. Sims; "The 
Sin of Olga Zassoulich," by Frank Barrett ; "A 
Child Widow," by Mrs. F. H. Williamson; and 
Charles Reade's last novel "A Perilous Secret " ; and 
last but not least Miss Braddon's latest, "Gerard, or 
the World, the Flesh, and the Devil." 



We quoted in a recent number Mr. Richard Dow- 
ling in praise of Whitaker's Almanack. A few days 
after a gentleman came in to our place at 77 Union 
Street, and asked "Have you got Whitaker on the 
Brain?" to which we replied "Oh ! not at all, but all 
the same Whitaker is the best Almanack going and is 
cheap at half-a-crown. " ' ' That may be, " returned the 
gentleman, but the book I want is "The Brain," by 
Whitaker. 



A correspondent sends us the following: — "Will 
the writer of ' Brown's Aberdeen Book-Stall ' kindly 
inform us what connection there is (if any), between 
James Staats Forbes, the proprietor of the Lochlands, 
(No. 3, p. 35), and Mr. James Staats Forbes, the 
chairman of the London, Chatham, and Dover 
Railway Company ? The recurrence of such a remark- 
able name as 'Staats' can hardly be an accidental 
coincidence. Besides, I think I have seen the Chatham 
and Dover chairman alluded to as an Aberdonian. " 
Can any of our friends supply the information ? 



56 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



u 



(Slubat tba\> sa\\— %at ^ame 8a\>," 



Gazette. 

The appearance of No. i of "Brown's Bookstall," a kind of 
local Publisher's Circular, I take it, which aims at mingling the 
useful with the agreeable, and, as matter of fact, gives some 
interesting reminiscences of the originators of the oldest book- 
selling firm in the city from an easy recognisable pen, ought to be 
cordially welcomed. If successful in its aims of "gilding the 
the philosophic pill," "Brown's Bookstall" will, it is stated, 
" appear at regular intervals." 

I see no reason why it should not. The materials are plenti- 
ful, and, if treated in a fairly broad and catholic spirit, the result 
must be alike instructive and amusing. 

Free Press. 

Still another local periodical has just seen the light. This is 
a twelve page quarto, entitled "Brown's Bookstall," the aim of 
which is "to mingle the useful and the agreeable," and a due 
appearance "at regular intervals" is promised if the adventure 
meets with success. The magazine is published by Messrs. A. 
Brown & Co., every alternate page being utilised for advertise- 
ment. An interesting article opens the magazine on "Brown's 
Aberdeen Bookstall " giving an account of the original bookstall, 
by Provost Alexander Brown, over a century ago. 

Journal. 

Still another local publication. It emanates from the firm of 
Messrs. A. Brown & Co., Booksellers, Union Street, and bears 
the significant title of " Brown's Bookstall." Its object is "To 
mingle the useful with the agreeable," and the little publication 
has begun well. Chief amongst the literary contents is an 
interesting article giving an account of the opening of the 
original "Bookstall " (over a century ago) by Alexander Brown — 
afterwards a Provost of the city — in which the writer takes 
occasion to give a number of facts relating to the literature and 
archaeology of the city. A very creditable illustration of Byron's 
residence in Broad Street is given on the page in which the art- 
icle appears. The author is described as " a well known pen" 
which many will recognise. 

People's Journal. 

Business becomes brisk as advertising advances. In acknow- 
ledging their appreciation of that truth, Messrs. A. Brown & Co., 
77 Union Street, have started the publication whose title heads 
this paragraph, and have intimated that if they succeed in mak- 
ing it " useful and agreeable," the little magazine will appear at 
regular intervals. In the first issue the desired combination is 
certainly attained. " Brown's Bookstall " should prove highly 
useful for the firm, as their business enterprise is by its means 
kept before the public in an attractive form ; and the number is 
at the same time "agreeable" to readers because many of its 
pages are filled with thoroughly interesting matter. There are 
chatty paragraphs relating to authors and their works, and there 
is an excellent sketch— apparently the beginniug of a series— of 
the growth of bookselling in Aberdeen during the past century. 
This sketch is from the practised pen of a gentlemen who him- 
self was virtually "Brown & Co." for very many years, and 
whose knowledge as to the subject of which he writes may be 
fairly regarded as unrivalled. We wish the new venture all the 
prosperity sought for it. 



Banffshire Journal. 

Messrs. A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen, have 
issued the first number of a little unpretentious magazine, 
" Brown's Bookstall," which contains a number of gossipy notes 
on literary topics, and a sketch of the history of the original 
Bookstall opened more than a century ago by Alexander Brown, 
afterwards twice Lord Provost of Aberdeen. 

Figaro. 

"Brown's Bookstall" a new local publication, is worthy to 
be ranked among the original notions that from time to time 
come teeming out of Yankee brains. Indeed, it is nothing more 
nor less than a capital advertising sheet issued by the firm, 
who ought presumably to benefit most by its publication. But, 
there is nothing wrong in that; and the "bookie" is cheap at 
the price, were it only for the very readable article on "Brown's 
Aberdeen Bookstall," from the pen, I believe, of Mr. George 
Walker, at one time connected with the firm of Brown & Co. 

Publishers' Circular. 

Messrs. Brown & Co., of Aberdeen, are a historical firm, 
tracing their existence to a little book shop opened more than a 
century ago by Alexander Brown, who afterwards twice held the 
Provostship of the city. That they are an enterprising firm, too, 
is indicated by the starting of a little monthly called " Brown's 
Bookstall," in the first number of which there is an interesting 
account of the growth of the business, evidently from the pen of 
ex-Bailie George Walker, who retired from the firm some years 
ago. The "Bookstall" contains several illustrations, including 
a view of the house in which Lord Byron lived in Aberdeen, and 
some readable notes. 

Figaro. 

No. 2 of "Brown's Bookstall" contains an intensely interest- 
ing article on Alexander Brown, Provost of Aberdeen, 1822-3 and 
1826-7, and a capital process-block of the old gentleman accom- 
panies the reading matter. The number is clearly printed. 

Gazette. 

"Brown's Bookstall" No. 2 which has made its appearance 
this week, is enriched by a portrait of Alexander Brown, Provost 
of Aberdeen 1822-3 an< 3 1826-7, from a miniature by A. Robert- 
son. It is nicely executed and will be regarded with interest by 
many. Provost Brown was, as readers know, the father of 
Principal Brown, the venerable head of the Aberdeen Free 
Church College. 

People's Journal. 

This little perodical may now be deemed established. The 
second number is even more attractive than the first. Ex-Bailie 
Walker's cleverly written notice of bygone days in the book- 
selling trade of the city continues to be deeply interesting. 
Messrs. A. Brown & Co. deserve thanks as well as congratul- 
ations. They do their advertising boldly, but their business 
announcements are accompanied by so many readable items that 
"Brown's Bookstall" has become much more appreciated than 
gratis publications usually are. 

Northern Daily News. 

The second number of "Brown's Bookstall" will more than 
maintain the favour with which, by old fashioned Aberdonians, 
the first was received. 






Brown's Book-Stall. 



57 



V 



— ^z/bX Printed. 



Jftr. (Eharles proton. 

)N STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 


Mp. XleXanclep dropclon. 


50 

ARDS, 

Jest Quality, 


MR. pEORGE J^AILTON. 


Printed for 


9TU. W. <5)*ty*zno. 


flfr. Jfndrew ^ arc I ay. 



Addresses, 6d. Extra. 



A. BroWr\ & Go., 77 Unio * street ' •"* 

7 ' ^v© ABERDEEN 



5 8 Brown's Book-Stall. 



Ill ^m •• v 

@ ^ J^ Itittlcjohn &t $oris 





ecag (and WfiigBisg, 



They are Unexcelled Kok* 

iXdX For Quality and Cheapness. 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 



9 Green, ABERDEEN 



(3rate Decorations. Kex, 

The Elegance and Variety of the Designs for this Season are 
unequalled. See our Special Show- Room. Decorative Grasses, 
Fans, Screens, &c. 

@ut=g)oor (Barnes. Ke\, 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, &c. Extensive Stock. First Consign- 
ments now showing. 

Gbeap French Pneumatie & Cloek wk Toys. Kex, 

A Large Quantity just to hand. Attractive Novelties. 



Collie \ Taijlof 



j 123 Titnion Street 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



59 



1foow to protect Books from 
Bookworms, 




B 



THE REAL 
BOOK-WORM. 



OTH in this country and in 
India, there is great uncert- 
ainty as to the insect that 
does prey on books. Although I 
have often made careful search in 
India for the book-worm, the only 
insect ever discovered amongst the 
leaves or about the binding of 
books was the "fish-insect" a 
Lepisma. Now it must be per- 
fectly clear to any one who looks 
at the Lepisma and at the tunnels 
in a book that it could not poss- 
ibly be the depredator, as the holes 
are not big enough for it or adapted to its shape. In 
my opinion, the book-worms, both at home and in the 
tropics, vary. Sometimes they are the larvae of moths, 
sometimes the grubs of beetles, and at times perhaps 
mites. There is another little tenant to be found in 
some cases — viz., the "book-scorpion" (a Chelifer), 
but being carniverous he is a friend to the librarian, 
as he eats up any small insects that come in his way. 
I am rather inclined to think that the Lepisma may do 
the same, although he gets the credit of being a vege- 
tarian. A far-off cousin of the Lepisma^ the cockroach, 
is also a serious enemy to books in India. It is 
especially fond of those bound in the style called by 
booksellers "cloth boards," and eats off in patches 
all the coloured shiny stuff that covers the cloth, 
leaving the latter quite bare, and causing the book to 
have a very mangy and disagreeable appearance. The 
books most subject to its attacks are those done up in 
the highly- coloured glossy modern style of binding, 
and I have several here quite hideous in appearance 
from the way in which it has peeled off the glaze of 
their bindings. As a means of protection against the 
cockroach, I have for some years had any books re- 
quiring re-binding done up in half-calf, with the 
boards covered in French style with marble paper, 
which is more cleanly and not so liable to keep damp 
as cloth. Cockroaches never attack books bound in 
this manner. The worst of all enemies to books in 
the tropics are the "white ants," but so much have I 
suffered from these wretches in feelings and in purse 
that I will content myself with saying that their rav- 
ages are unmentionable ! At the same time I have the 
satisfaction of stating that it was my good fortune to 
devise a simple remedy, which effectually protects 
books and papers of all kinds not only from white-ants, 
but from all other insect pests. 

It one day occurred to me that the corrosive sublim- 
ate solution used in the herbarium for plants might 
with the addition of a little carbolic acid be equally 
efficacious for books. This, after due experiment, I 
found to be the case, but unfortunately carbolic acid 
(when it gets stale) has rather a disagreeable odour. 
On this account thymol was substituted for the acid, 
and the preservative solution was then, I think, perfect. 



It was applied liberally with a soft brush inside about 
the binding and along the edges of the leaves, and the 
operation repeated at intervals of five or six months. — 
G. Bidie, Surgeon- General ( retired J, in the "Fishing 
Gazette.'''' 

THE BOOKWORM'S STORY. 

Thro' Papyrus with wisdom stored 

In ancient days my way I bored ; 

Ah, mem'ry of that far-off time, 

And succulence of Nilus' slime ! * 

'Twas nature's paper bred my kind 

And nurs'd fat worms of rev'rent mind ! 

The giants we before the flood, f 

With reptiles bred in Egypt's mud ! — 

Lost kindred mine that went to ash 

With Alexandria's lore and trash, % 

You'd scarce believe the diet strange 

Thro' which the Bookworm now must range : 

Cotton paper was plaguy stuff, 

And linen rag was bad enough, 

But things have come to such a pass 

That paper's made of straw and grass ! 

Esparto, ramie, young bamboo, 

All these and more I've eaten thro' ! 

But soft ; for now I must relate 

Th' apotheosis of my fate : 

Dyspeptic 'mid these modern books, 

I sought old haunts and shady nooks 

Intent on ancient tomes forgot 

That oft had been knocked down by lot ; 

But mov'd — by what I cannot tell — 

Unless its most unusual smell — 

I tried a book of goodly size, 

The hardest it of all my tries ! 

Away I bored, but I was floored, 

Ye Gods ! the thing was made of board! 

Yes, wood must now their paper give — 

Stuff that ye may not eat, and live ! 

* Egyptian paper was manufactured from the fine pellicles of 
the Papyrus which surrounded the trunk (the finest of which 
were in the middle), and not from the marrow of the plant. 
These pellicles were separated by means of a pin, or pointed 
mussel-shells, and spread on a table sprinkled with Nile water, 
in such a form as the size of the sheets required, and washed 
over with hot glue-like Nile-water. 

t Evidently the Bookworm had come across that exclamation 
upon the Elizabethan dramatists, "Theirs was the giant race 
before the flood ! " 

\ Referring, doubtless, to the burning of the great library in 
Alexandria. 

Ube Counting Ifoouse. 

We call attention to this new monthly publication, which is a 
high class illustrated practical journal of commerce and the arts, 
devoted to business management and methods, shorthand, and 
typewriting, and appeals specially to merchants, manufacturers, 
shippers, exporters, solicitors, bankers, financial agents, and 
share brokers. Its columns contain the latest intelligence bear- 
ing upon their pursuits, and special information of value to 
themselves and their clients. In the "Counting House" clerks 
will find a journal specially adapted to aid them in gaining a 
knowledge of counting house requirements. Its columns will be 
open for the full and free discussion of every matter affecting 
their interests. The publishers are Messrs. Raithby, Lawrence, 
& Co., Ltd., Leicester, and the price of the magazine is Six- 
pence. Sample copies can be seen at the Aberdeen Agents, 
A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



6o 



Brown's- Book-Stall. 



i 







Cabinet /Ifoafcers ano {Upholsterers, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shout tyooms at 



257 I)|1I0|1 STREET, 



and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and WLpholsterg Goods. 



tlbe Cablliet jf UVnitUte made in their own Workshop will 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



is stocked with the 

best makes of 



Zheiv flew Carpet Saloon 

British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums, 
Mattings, Rugs, &c, 

Curtains and Upholstery Materials. 




IbOlbUm Cabinet MOtfeS are now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
. unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



ROBERT JHENDERSON, 33 and 35 Ur\ior\ Street. 



IReturn from JUondon. 





fj&ummer Fashions. 

of JVIillirvervj, Mantles, Jackets, Gapes, 
M©^OJ Pobes, Dress JVlaterials, Children's 
Qarmer\ts, and Qer\eral Drapervj. 



Extensive Purchases have been made for all Departments of the Warehouse. 
^^Dressmaking, ^antlemafung, an& Milliner?, 

THE MAKING-UP DEPARTMENTS are under EXPERIENCED MANAGERS, who, having visited London 
/p*v and secured THE NEWEST STYLES, are in a position to show Ladies THE FASHIONS 

^3^ FOR SUMMER WEAR. 



ROBERT HEHDERSOH, ""** Z^PS?**,. 



fls to Priee. 



It will pay you to buy your Stationery 
from A. Brown & Co., yy Union Street, 
Aberdeen. We supply One Pound of 
Club Vellum Note Paper for 6}4d. y and 
One Hundred Envelopes to match for 
6}4d. Give it a trial, you are sure to 
like it. 



A. S. GOOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



SPECIAL 

BLUE AND BLACK SERGE 

SUITS, 

£3 3s. 

K per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



A. S. COOK, 

26 MARKET STREET. 
ABERDEEN. 



THE 



B0fl-ACC0t$ SHI^T. 

NeWest Desigrvs ir\ 
FRENCH PRINTED and 
OXFORD SH1RTINQS. 



SPECIAL LINE. 



FINEST RANGE 

THREE GUINEA 
SUITINGS. 



THE 

BON-RCCOflD SHIHT 

FOR 

EVENING DRESS, 

5/, 6/, 7/6, and 8/6 



SPECIALTY. 

5 pei* cent. Discount 

For Cash. 



A. S. GOOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



SPECIALTY. 

DISCOUNT 
1/- in the £ 

to Cash purchasers. 



BEAVER, WORSTED, 
and VICUNA 

SUMMER 

OYERGOATINGS, 

Newest Shades. 



Removing p (S 



at MAY TERM to 

Xarge 2)0UBLE Shop, 

46 Market %\m\ 46, 

Dire op?osite f 03T-OFFICE. 



h* NEWEST -IK- 
DESIGNS & COLOURINGS 

IN 

Spring T Weeds. 



ADDRESS after 28th MAY: 

A. S. GOOH, 

46 MARKET STREET, 46 
ABERDEEN. 

Opposite Post-Office. 



STJZCIAZ ZINB 

TROUSERS, 

16/6 A PAIR. 
5 per cent. Discount for Cash. 



ADDRESS after 28th MAY: 

A. S. GOOH, 

46 MARKET STREET, 46 
ABERDEEN. 

Opposite Post-Office. 




No. 5. 



MAY. 



1892. 



jjoitfi Britisn anil (flercantiie Insurance Co.. 

IN WHICH IS NOW MERGED 

THE SCOTTISH PtyMHCIfllt RSSuWCE GO. 



FIRE, L IFE, AND ANN UITIES. 

Incorpo?*aled by Hoy at C7iarter and Special Acts of 'Parliament^ 

Total Assets exceed ^10,000,000. 

The Funds of the Life Department are not liable for obligations under the 
Fire Department, nor are the Funds of the Fire Department liable for obligations 
under the Life Department. In this Company, therefore, the Investments for the 
Life Department are kept entirely separate from those of the Fire Department, as 
set forth in the Balance Sheet. 



Income for 1890, 



^2,487,839, 



Hberbeen Boar?) 



GEORGE COLLIE. Esq., Advocate. 
JAMES F. LUMSDEN, Esq., Advocate. 
ALEX. M. OGSTON, Esq. of Ardoe. 



WILLIAM YEATS, Esq. of Auquhakney. 
JOHN WHYTE, Esq., Advocate. 
JOHN COOK, Esq., Backer. 



Local Manager— GEORGE W. W. BARCLAY.- 
Fire Superintendent— £> . B. MILNE. 

Prospectuses and full information as to several important features recently introduced can be obtained at the 

Chief Offices, Branches, and Agencies. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

Edinburgh — 64 Princes Street ; London — 61 Threadneedle: Street, E.C 

Aberdeen Office: 91 UNION STREET. 



BEST BE\)D\ttfc PUMTS 



AT 




ardno \ %rling'& 

11 Bridge Street, abefdeen. 






By Special Appointment 



Patronised by 




Royal China Saloons 




To The Queen. 



H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 



John Ford & Co., 

©lass and China (Dei?cbanfs, 

136 & 138 Union Street, 

<^>[ ABERDEEN. KeK, 



^Ise at 39 prinees jgtreet, and l^elyreeel Gj-lass Works, 




No. 5. 



MAY. 



Brown's Bber&een Bookstall. 



No. V. 




W 



ITH the possible 
exception of New- 
castle, where, when 
it was improved, the im- 
provements began where 
they were most needed, 
in the centre of the 
crowded town, no city in 
Britain was so entirely 
changed as Aberdeen 
was by the improvements 
carried out in it at the 
commencement of this 
century. In Edinburgh, 
when improvements be- 
gan, it was a new town 
which was created, upon 
an unoccupied site, and 
all that had to be done 
was to abolish the North 
Loch by drainage, and join by Bridge or 
Mound the old town with the new. 

But in Aberdeen there were sweeping 
changes to be made, and an entire obliter- 
ation of some of the old landmarks ; radical 
changes beginning at the very centre, and 
extending away so far beyond the ancient 
limits that, in ecclesiastical language, the new 
territory was "in partibus infidelium" 

We fail to realize the boldness of the con- 
ception of Union Street, unless we try to 



conceive or bear in mind the previous appear- 
ance of Aberdeen, and this, owing to the 
many and great changes in it, it is now some- 
what difficult to do. In the old troublous 
times when might was right, when law con- 
sisted mainly in — 

The good old rule, the simple plan, 
That he should take who has the power, 
And he should keep who can — 

hills were natural fortresses intended to be 
crowned with cities, as so many hills in the 
eastern portion of France still are; the hills 
serve both as a look-out for, and a defence 
from enemies. 

Such was St. Catherine's hill for Aberdeen : 
its central defence, and the rallying point of 
the citizens. It was in the immediate prox- 
imity of the Town-house, and the place of the 
city; and protected the Quay-head, where 
" ilka boat and birlin lay." It was a steep, 
round, conical hill, with its summit fully 
twenty to thirty feet higher than Castle 
Street, from which it was separated by the 
Narrow Wynd and the Chaquer Raw, in 
which was the Mint. Round its eastern 
and southern sides the Shipraw winded in 
ever increasing steepness, with the "yairdens" 
of the burghers on its sides lying to the sun; 
and, as old historians tell us, was embowered 
in verdure. On the north it overlooked the 
Rotten Raw and the Round Table (now the 
site of the offices of the Free Press.) On the 
north-west, hanging on its side, was the Nether- 
kirkgate ; while on the west, its boundary 
was Carnegie's Brae leading to Putachieside, 
named after the property of Lord Forbes, 
whose country seat was Putachie Castle. 



62 Brown's Book-Stall. 






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Brown's Book-Stall. 



63 



Carnegie's Brae is still in existence, but 
Putachieside is now buried under Market 
Street. Those interested in old landmarks 
should explore the close at the back of the 
Cafe, the courts in the Shiprow, and the 
ground to the west of the Adelphi, and they 
will thus get a better idea of the old city, 
and the great change in this portion, con- 
sequent on the opening up of the new western 
approach. 

It was a stroke of genius, and the precursor 
of railway cuttings, to think of obliterating 
St. Catherine's Hill ; bridging over the wide 
chasm which intervened between it and the 
Denburn, and crossing it by a bridge which, 
except that over the Dee at Chester, was then 
the largest span of any bridge in the Kingdom. 
The Londoners, who profess to teach the 
world, had, and still have, the most absurd 
ideas of any place beyond the sound of Bow 
Bells, and especially if in Scotland ; for in a 
Gazetteer published in this century, Aberdeen 
was described as a " small fishing village on 
the east coast of Scotland, the inhabitants of 
which live chiefly on fish and seaweed " ! 
While, that the Dee flows under Union Bridge, 
and that the inhabitants all wear kilts, are 
errors which seem persistent and ineradicable. 

But what shall we say of thousands of our 
own citizens who walk along Union Street 
daily, without having the slightest idea that 
they are traversing an artificial road partly 
under, and in some parts again from 20 to 50 
feet above the natural level of the ground ? 
In the " teens " of this century, it was literally 
an entrance to the city, up in the air, striding 
over, and standing up high above the roofs 
of the neighbouring houses, and quite justify- 
ing Lord Medwyn's saying. The conception 
was decidedly ahead of the age, for even in 
the "thirties," the houses in Union Street 
were few and far between, and the blanks on 
the north side of the Green were filled up by 
a low brick w T all. Over this wall, when Simon 
Grant, "the toon's officer" and the "Tak a'" of 
the time, then considered a very host in himself, 
and quite equal to Mr. Wyness and a hundred 
modern policemen, was not in sight (which, 
however, did not ensure immunity, for — 
witchcraft being not quite extinct — it was 
believed that Simon had the remarkable 



faculty of being in two places at once), the 
errand boys (some of whom in after years 
actually became magistrates), partly owing to 
the principle of original sin, and partly arising 
from the natural desire to exercise their skill, 
often endeavoured to drop stones down the 
chimneys of the houses in the Green, for 
they looked so temptingly and invitingly 
open below the level of the street, that any 
boy who could resist the temptation was con- 
sidered more than mortal. It is a fortunate 
thing that forty years gives exemption, else as 
magistrates, some of these old boys would 
have felt it necessary to bring the young boy 
before himself as an old man, and give himself 
a serious admonition, or, if there was no sign 
of contrition, inflict a fine of 2/6 or 24 hours. 
Travellers tell us wonderful stories of the 
catacombs of Rome, but how few dwellers in 
Bon-Accord are aware that under Union 
Street there are many huge vaults — some 
actually with roofs over them — the dark and 
dismal abodes of spirits of diverse qualities, 
under the supervision of the priests of the 
Excise, by whose permission only can they 
reascend into the regions of light. Mean- 
time, kept in strict durance, they peacefully 
repose, in what, in the olden time, may once 
have been the site of some blithe and cheerful 
parlour, where bairnies, long since dead and 
gone, once romped and played : the cosy 
bedroom of some old world citizen of credit 
and renown, who, there, doffing his wig and 
donning a Kilmarnock, lay down and slept 
the sleep of the just : or it may have been a 
dining-room where — 

The guests for whose presence a table was spread 
May now enter as ghosts for they're every one dead. 

(Sic transit, etc.) 

So soon is merit forgotten, and so greatly 
is the precept of "honour to whom honour," 
violated now-a-days, that nine persons out of 
every ten give the credit of initiating these 
improvements to Provost James Hadden, 
who was four times elected Provost, and 
served for nine years as such. But the nine 
persons are wrong, for although he worked 
ably and energetically in carrying them out, 
it is to the fine taste and discriminating fore- 
sight of Provost Thomas Leys of Glasgoforest 



6 4 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



TRY. 



Liittlejokrv & SorVs 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 



9 Green, ABERDEEN 



John Heaths Pens 




DISPATCH PEN S 



(Jl JOHN HEATH'S 

yy 

OFFICIAL PEW TM.BS/g 



F. M. B., 2/6 



Sample Box (24 kinds) and List, 7 stamps, BIRMINGHAM. 



X 



easonable Prices and Good Work 



W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers, 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberfceen. 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries." 



1 



flk CLUBmui 

.NOTEfAPER g^^ 



A BROWN &GO 

STATIONERS, V •*> 

7 7. Union Street, ABERDEEN.* 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



65 



that we are mainly indebted for their concep- 
tion and commencement, — although, dying in 
1809, he did not live to see their completion. 

In the Bill which passed as an Act, 4th 
April, 1800, it was provided that Union Street 
should be sixty feet wide, with fifty feet on 
each side for building areas. But on the Bill 
being taken into consideration, some one on 
the Parliamentary Committee remarked that 
an additional width of ten feet would make 
it a very splendid street. On this, it is said, 
that an express was instantly sent off by the 
Aberdeen Committee, ordering the deviation 
pegs, marking the line of the new street, to 
be shifted in the night-time ten feet wider, 
which was done. And so it comes to pass 
that although the Act specifies sixty feet, yet 
Union Street is seventy feet in width, save at 
Union Place (now obliterated), where it was 
carried through John Cadenhead's garden 
ground. Potatoes were not then, as now, 
a field produce, and John's crop having very 
likely been over manured, were blown upon 
by Dr. Kidd, who made a very practical 
application of them from the pulpit, com- 
paring them to the hypocrite as "fair without, 
but rotten at the heart," which he had to 
retract and apologise for afterwards. So 
even before the Act passed, his garden ground 
was feued, and the houses on it were origin- 
ally built as summer residences for the citizens, 
the two on the east of Rose Street being con- 
sidered as model houses ! Very luckily, the 
restrictions on the feus were sufficient to pro- 
tect the amenity of the street from its being 
narrowed more than it is at this point. 

The wide gulf between St. Catherine's hill 
and the Doo'cot brae having been bridged 
over, and the promised land of the period 
having been reached, there resulted what 
might be termed a boom in the building 
trade. As a rule, booms generally result in 
a reaction, and in this case the boom resulted 
in the temporary bankruptcy of the city some 
years after, in 181 7. ' Meantime, everything 
went on swimmingly. The steep brae of the 
churchyard, Aidie's Wynd, a continuation of 
the Back Wynd, and Belmont Street, were 
each filled up to the level of Union Street. 
St. Nicholas Street was opened, and in doing 
so, two earthen jars, each containing an 



immense quantity of silver coins, were dis- 
covered, — buried, as was supposed, some four 
hundred years previously. 

Beyond the Bridge, the proprietors of the 
ground were all busy planning new streets; 
and unhampered by the restrictions of the 
Town Council as to the style of buildings, 
their ground was rapidly feued and built on ; 
more rapidly, indeed, than Union Street was. 
Many reflections have been made on the un- 
wisdom of the dealings of the Council regard- 
ing their alienation of their property in the 
Stocket, for it is so easy to be wise now-a-days, 
and long after the event. Charity should 
induce caution in judgment, and should lead 
us to imagine that their heads were as long 
and — fed by good oatmeal — their brains were 
almost, if not altogether, as big as ours. The 
ground was very poor, and so covered with 
stones, that 

If only you'd seen it before it was feued, 

The reasons would seem both abundant and good. 

The bankruptcy of the city was not entirely 
a misfortune — possibly it might have been 
averted by a sale of the feus without restric- 
tions, in which case Union Street might have 
been ruined, as a specimen of a noble street, 
by the erection of mean and ignoble buildings. 
But the creditors of the city had faith, and 
knowing well that both time and the building 
boom were in their favour, the restrictions 
were maintained, and in six years the creditors 
were all repaid — leaving an immense reversion 
of unbuilt-on feus for the benefit of the Com- 
mon good. The only two houses built in the 
west in 1806, were the mansion-house of 
Crimmonmogate (now occupied by the North- 
ern Club), with its then wonderful monolith 
pillars, and that on the west side of Diamond 
Street, long occupied by Miss Brebner of 
Learney, and now by the Royal Bank. 

Fashion— that fickle jade — forsook her old 
quarters and patronised a new locality for the 
residences of her votaries in each decade of 
the century. In the earlier ones, the county 
families had their town residences alongside 
those of the local grandees, in the Shiprow 
and other places like it, in which one can still 
find houses with carved stone entrances, 
monograms, and traces of coats of arms, 
and rooms in them with fine richly carved 



66 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Jelegrams— "LORIMER, BOOTMAKER, /ABERDEEN." 



James horimef & Son, 

Boot & Shoe Saloons, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 

157 Union Street, Aberdeen, 



LJAVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, 

including every variety of 

33oots, JShoes, and flippers 

For Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 

In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly on hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shooting, Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ©r&ers ot lEvcvy Description /Iftafce to /Ifceasuve, 




PIDINQ BOOTS. 
FIELD BOOTS. 



FISH1NQ BOOTS. 
LIVERY BOOTS. 



SH00T1NQ BOOTS. 
H1QHLAND BpOQUES 




5 per Cent. Discount for Cash Payments 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



67 



panels, chimney pieces, and ceilings, now 
strangely out of place with their present 
surroundings and occupants. And the older 
the family was the more its members seemed 
to cling to these old residences ; for as 
Ruskin says, or means to say, "Is not a 
house a sacred thing ? " Gradually, how- 
ever, the prosperous merchants of the town, 
attracted by fresh air, open space, and cleanli- 
ness, migrated westwards, and houses of all 
grades, and to suit all purses, were run up 
in new streets, squares, and terraces, of which 
there were no fewer than thirty-seven in ten 
years ! John Cadenhead must have been a 
far-seeing man, although his model houses are 
now mere curiosities. He had already feued 
much of his ground, and it is said that some 
of the houses on the south side of Union 
Place were built as country lodgings to front 
Justice Mill Lane, and thus we only see their 




JAMESON S HOUSE, SCHOOLHII.L. 

hinder parts. And so, although the houses 
on the west side of the Guestrow had gardens, 
and a good out look behind, Union Place out- 
rivalled them, and was soon occupied by a row 
of houses which fitted into the line of Union 
Street, and so were untouched by the Act. 
The modern and fashionable Marischal Street, 



and the still more fashionable Carmelite 
Street — in which some of the best county 
families had their residences — were quite 
eclipsed by Union Terrace, in which the 
feuars have largely benefited by unearned 
increments, as, by the spirited action of the 
Town Council, it promises to be a centre of 
attraction to all eyes — quite irrespective of 
the cost ; for some things are worth paying 
for, especially when art can beautify nature. 

Then Golden Square, with a Silver Street 
on each side — "an apple of gold in a basket 
of silver " — became the masher of the period 
and the residence of the elite ; to be followed 
in turn by Crown Street, Bon-Accord Square 
and Terrace, until in succession they were all 
eclipsed by the magnificent suburbs which 
arose in the west under the brilliant light and 
leading of Sir Alexander Anderson. Than 
these suburbs, there is really nothing finer 
anywhere, and all strangers willingly admit 
this; but some of our citizens, with perceptive 
eyes half blinded by too much familiarity, do 
not see it. To cure this, let each of them, 
fancying themselves strangers, step out to 
the suburbs and look around them with a 
stranger's eyes, and as seeing Aberdeen for 
the first time, and then, wherever they have 
travelled, if they do not get a new revel- 
ation, they are blind indeed. It is a thousand 
times more likely that they will come round 
to the general opinion of the citizens that 
Aberdeen is the hub of the universe, near 
which the garden of Eden was placed, and 
that it is not to be wondered at although all 
men who attain eminence are anxious to 
claim connection with it. Children drink 
in this idea with their mother's milk, and 
not being contradicted in the Shorter Catech- 
ism, it is believed in from the earliest times, 
and is ingrained in their hearts. 

That ever since the Union, Scotland is the 
capital of England and Aberdeen the capital 
of Scotland — if not taught in the Board 
Schools — is believed by all true bairns of 
Bon-Accord, and is a proof of the great 
advantage which England secured to herself 
by the Treaty. 

So, also, that Aberdeen is the first of 
Scottish towns, is a mere truism, for Aber- 
brothick being obsolete, this was settled in 



68 Brown's Book-Stall. 



GRATE DECORATIONS. 

The Elegance and Variety of the Designs for this Season are unequalled. See our 
Special Show-Room. 

DECORATIVE GRASSES, FANS, SCREENS, &c. 
OUT-DOOR GAMES. 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, Cricket, Badminton, Lawn Bowls, Hurlingham, Aunt Sally, 
&c. Extensive Stock. First Consignments now showing. 

CHILDREN'S CARS. 

Reliable Make, 12/6 to 47/6. 

TRAVELLING BAGS. 

A Fresh Consignment ; Moderate Prices and Serviceable Qualities. 



Collie & Taylor, 



Bon-Keeopcl Bajaap, 
Te ' eP No ne S7 <,. 12 3 Qn'ion Street. 



BALL-poTntITd pens 

Are constructed on a scientific basis. A rolling ball has of all bodies the greatest momentum 
with the least resistance. Applied to pen points the outcome is astonishingly pleasant. There 
are twelve varieties of Ball-Pointed Pens, which, experience proves, will suit all hands, 
The following are the most popular — For Book-keeping, 516EF, 5 2 if. ; For General Corres- 
pondence, 516F., 526M. ; For Fluent Writing, 532F., 537M. 

If uncertain — buy an assorted box, and choose a pen to suit your hand. 

While at your stationer's also ask for a 
it 



FEDERATION" PENHOLDER. 




It prevents the pen from blotting when laid on the desk, and gives a firm and comfortable 

grip for the fingers. 

Manufactured for ORMISTON & GLASS, LONDON, 

AND SUPPLIED BY ALL STATIONERS. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



6 9 



the earliest times by the Gazetteers, and later 
by that leal son of Bon-Accord who unanswer- 
ably asked — "Tak' awa' Aberdeen and twal' 
miles roon it, and faur are ye?" And then 
for the belief that the garden of Eden was in 
its immediate neighbourhood, there are so 
many testimonies, so cumulative and con- 
vincing to Aberdonians who do not require 
surgical operations to put things into their 
minds, that it may be considered as settled. 
For, Paradise must have been placed on a 
primitive geological formation, and of all 
places Aberdeen best supplies this requisite. 
It is confirmed by ancient and modern 
authorities. Ptolemy places it in Ultima 
Thule, then supposed to be near Monymusk, 
and sure enough there it is still. That 
Gaelic was the language spoken is confidently 
affirmed. Even more certain is it, that the 
Urquhart clan trace their unbroken geneal- 
ogical pedigree from Adam, which they could 
hardly do unless he had been a neighbour. 
Then, the Grants in the vicinity maintain that 
they are specially mentioned in " Genesis," 
although, by a very simple and easily ac- 
counted for error, the highly improbable 
word "Giants" has been substituted by some 
sleepy transcriber, stupid comp., or wicked 
P.D. And, when the plentiful supply of fine 
timber on Donside is considered, their claim 
to have had a boat of their own at the flood, 
is surely possible, then probable, and so 
feasible. Should some incredulous persons 
still doubt — which is always dangerous — they 
should remember the treatment of Galileo. 
Should they demand a "grain of salt" before 
accepting this, then it is furnished by a 
perfectly unbiassed witness, the last, the 
learned, and the most sensible of all the pre- 
formation writers — John Major or Mair 
(1469 — 1550), whose "De Gestis Scotorum" 
(or "Greater Britain") has been recently 
translated and reprinted. He there expressly 
states that Aberdeen was the original seat of 
the Scottish monarchy, — just as WE might 
have expected. And so in far-back times, long 
before Dunfermline, Perth, Stirling, or even 
that upstart Edinburgh, were taken into royal 
favour, ungratefully returning this by barbar- 
ous treatment, Aberdeen — with a population 
then of not more than 3,00c, who mostly 



dwelt in wooden booths or clay-built hovels 
with thatched roofs, and whose palatial resid- 
ences were only distinguishable by their stone 
walls and red-tiled roofing — was the resid- 
ence of the monarch, and its citizens were 
accustomed to shine in the radiance of a 
court, and to bask in the smiles of a sovereign. 
Is it any wonder that men desire to be con- 
nected with "Aberdeen Awa'"? 



If you want to get a good account of the growth of the 
town of Aberdeen, with a plan showing St. Catherine's 
Hill and the streets of the city about 200 years ago, 
get "A Territorial History of the Burgh of Aberdeen," 
by George Cadenhead, price 1/. 

A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



/IDp Boofes. 



All round the room my silent servants wait — 

My friends in every season, bright and dim ; 

Angels and seraphim 

Come down and murmur to me, sweet and low, 

And spirits of the skies all come and go 

Early and late ; 

All from the old world's divine and distant date, 

From the sublimer few, 

Down to the poet who but yester-eve 

Sang sweet and made us grieve, 

All come, assembling here in order due, 

And here I dwell with Poesy, my mate, 

With Erato and all her vernal sighs, 

Great Clio with her victories elate. 

Or pale Urania's deep and starry eyes. 

friends, whom chance and change can never harm, 
Whom Death the tyrant cannot doom to die, 
Within whose folding soft eternal charm 

1 love to lie 

And meditate upon your verse that flows, 
And fertilizes wheresoe'er it goes. 

Barry Cornwall. 



xMr. Charles Dudley Warner, in Harper's Magazine, 
observes that comparatively few booksellers are men 
of taste in letters, men who read, or keep the run of 
new publications. If a retail grocer knew no more of 
his business than many booksellers know of theirs, he 
would certainly fail. A bookseller in any community, 
if he is a man of literary culture, and has a love of 
books and knowledge of them, can do a great deal 
for the cultivation of the public taste. His shop 
becomes a sort of intellectual centre of the town. 
If the public find there an atmosphere of books, and 
are likely to have their wants met for publications new 
or rare, they will generally sustain the shop. 



7° 



Brown's Book-Stall. 







Cabinet /llbabecs an£> TUpbolsterecs, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shorn Hooms a t 



257 flltlOJl STREET, 



and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and WLpholstery Goods. 



XTbe Cabinet jfUrnttUre made in their own Workshop will 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



is stocked with the 

best makes of 



TTbeir IRew Carpet Saloon 

British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums, 
Mattings, Rugs, &c, 

Curtains and Upholstery Materials. 




IbOlblttn Cabinet WOrkS are now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



71 



XTbe printer 






The printer is a patron of the art preservative of all 
arts, but he frequently has the art of getting a poor 
writer into a pickle. 

The printer sets while standing and stands while 
setting. 

The printer is not usually a wealthy person, but 
generally has a quoin or two about him. 

The printer does not often carry a cane, but you 
will almost always find him with a stick in his hand. 
Sometimes he is a stick himself. 

The printer is a materialist. All his thoughts are 
upon the matter. 

Most men like to have things come out square at the 
end of each day, but the printer hates to be obliged to 
bring his work out even. This sounds odd, but it is 
even so. 

Though correcting his errors every day, the printer 
may all the time be growing worse. 

He is often a profound reader, but always dislikes 
solid matter. 

The printer is like the actor in the fact that he hates 
to see a beggarly array of empty boxes. 

The printer may not be averse to poetry, but he 
detests pi. 

The good printer is known by his form. So careful 
is he of his form that he always locks it up. 

Though not always correct, the printer's work is 
invariably done by rule. 

The printer is a very inoffensive individual, but is 
quite clever with the shooting stick. 

The printer is not satisfied with thinking that his 
work is complete : he wants a proof of it. 

The printer is your true man of letters, though he 
may not be a literary man. 

The printer is an upright man, but he is frequently 
seen about the galleys. 

The printer used to be a very bashful sort of fellow, 
but now that females are employed in printing offices, 
he will set up with a girl six evenings in the week. 

The printer is often beside himself — that is to say, 
he frequently stands beside his frame. 

The printer is not necessarily a sporting character, 
but his form may frequently be seen in the chase. 

Like the lawyer, the printer is dependent upon his 
cases for a livelihood. 

Much more might be said of the printer, but this 
must do for to-day. Let us close by hoping that when 
he becomes dead matter, an imposing stone may be 
erected to his memory. — British Printer. 



^Ibe "Cucfeoo Song. 



The earliest ballad known in the English language 
is believed to be a "Cuckoo Song," written at the 
beginning of the reign of Henry III. It is as follows :— 

" Sumer is icumen in 
Lhude sing cuccu ; 
Groweth sed and bloweth med, 
And spright the wde nu. 
Sing cuccu. 

Awe beteth after lamb, 
Lhouth after calve cu, 
Bulloc sterteth, 
Bucke verteth, 
Murie sing cuccu ; 
Cuccu, cuccu ; 
Wei singes thu cuccu, 
Ne swik thu naver nu." 

Which may be thus modernized : — 

Summer is come in, 

Loud sings the cuckoo 

Groweth seed and bloweth mead,* 

Now springs the wood ; 

Sing cuckoo. 

The ewe bleats after the lamb, 

The cow lows after the calf, 

The bullock starts, 

The buck verts, f 

Merrily sings the cuckoo, 

Mayst thou never cease. 

* Is in flower. t Retires to the ferns and shade. 



Some of Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" are 
broad ones, and Emerson is said to have remarked 
that there were to be found among them all manner of 
leaves except fig leaves. 



If all people, instead of reading so much with a view 
to the gaining of so much more knowledge, would try 
to carry out in practice the despised elementary know- 
ledge they already possess, they would show far more 
real intellectual capacity, and be both healthier and 
happier. It is with science as Mr. Matthew Arnold 
says it is with religion — conduct, and not the mere 
acquisition of knowledge, is three-fourths of the battle 
and the victory. — The Hospital. 



Influenza, or "the complaint," first came to England 
in the year 15 10. To the reign of Henry VIII. , then, 
we owe this among other blessings. It is an older 
family heir-loom than the potato and the Reformation. 
— CasselVs Family Magazine. 



Jane Austen, a girl who wrote for girls, has found 
her warmest admirers and most discerning critics for 
more than a hundred years among savans and men of 
letters. — Speaker. 



7 2 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



PIGEON HOLES 




ILLUSTRATION OF PIGEON HOLES WITH FALL-DOWN FRONT. 



THESE can be had in a variety of styles and sizes, from 16J inches wide, 18J high, 
10 deep, at 16/-; to 25 \ inches wide, 30.J high, 17 deep, at 90/. The cheaper ones 
are made of pine and covered with cloth ; the better ones are of hard wood, highly 
polished, best finished and dove-tailed. They can be had without doors; or with two doors; 
locking in the middle; with fall-down front as shown in our illustration ; or with revolving shutter. 



A detailed list of sizes may be had from, and sample seen at 

A. Brown & Co., 

77 UNION STREET, , 

ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



73 







Scattered Xeavee 







A 



cheap edition has 
just been published 
of " Dreams," by 
Olive Schreiner, the 
author of ' ' The Story of an 
African Farm. " It consists 
of a series of eleven allegor- 
ical stories. Considering 
the demand there was for 
the former edition at 6/, 
we anticipate a good sale 
for the new edition at 2/6, cash price, 1/11. 



>ct: 



We understand that Mr. Robert Louis Stevenson 
is about to publish a sequel to "Kidnapped," under 
the title of " David Balfour." We hope it will prove 
to be as good as "Kidnapped," which is, we think, 
much the best of Stevenson's novels. Apart from the 
interest of the story, it ought to be read by anyone 
wishing to have a vivid picture of life in the Western 
Highlands after the '45. 

But after all, it is not as a novelist but as an essayist 
that Stevenson shines with the greatest brilliancy. 
His " Familiar Studies of Men and Books," his 
"Memories and Portraits," and his " Virginibus 
Puerisque," present a literary fare of a quality to suit 
the most fastidious. We have not yet had time to 
peruse "Across the Plains," which is his latest volume, 
but we look forward to reading it as to a treat in 
store — something to make life worth living a little 
longer. The volumes may all be had 4/6 each cash. 

Apropos of his travel sketches we quote from the 
National Observer: — Some there are who can wander 
far afield and yet retain the virtue of the artistic 
voyager. " I travel not to go anywhere," says Mr. 
Stevenson, "but to go I travel for travel's sake." 
The "Inland Voyage" and the "Travels with a 
Donkey" are untouched by the dreary usefulness of 
exploration. You learn naught from their pages of 
French Geography. But you are richer by a hundred 
subtle and whimsical reflections on men and mortals ; 
you are enchanted by innumerable impressions, seized 
in a phrase, of buoyant mornings and the wholesome 
weariness of evening ; while the sudden romance 
which imagination detects in the common-place is a 
perpetual joy. Impressionism, in fact, is the secret 
also of the traveller's art, and so rare is the faculty 
that you may count its master-expressions on the 
fingers of one hand. 

The success which has in former years attended the 
publication of Cassell & Co.'s "Academy Pictures," 
has encouraged them to extend their selection of 
pictures for reproduction this year. They will publish 



four parts at 1/- each, uniform with the Magazine of 
Art. Judging from the first part the reproductions are 
quite as good as formerly. 

G. Bernard Shaw has just published a new book, 
"The Quintessence of Ibsenism." If one cannot 
always agree with what Shaw says, one is generally 
sure to be pleased with the way he says it. 



"Pictures of 1892," which is just out, keeps up its 
reputation for artistic reproductions of the principal 
pictures of the year, as exhibited in the various 
galleries. It is printed this year in several tints, 
which is a doubtful improvement on the plain black 
and white of former years. The price is 1/- as formerly. 

A cheap edition of Chambers's " Popular Rhymes 
of Scotland" has just been issued, uniform with 
Chambers's "History of the Rebellion of 1745," 
which was re-published lately at 2/6, cash 1/11. This 
seems to be a subject of which readers never tire, 
judging from the rapidity with which this edition goes 
off. 



" David Grieve," Mrs. Humphry Ward's new novel 
which has been making so much stir in the literary 
world has now reached the level of the ordinary book- 
buyer. A 6/- edition, cash 4/6, will be ready in a 
day or two. 



A new 6/- book, which will be much more appreci- 
ated by some, is Rudyard Kipling's "Barrack Room 
Ballads." The critics are all singing its praises, and 
it is likely to have a boom. 

The new patent Gummer which we advertised in a 
former number has proved a great success, both from 
the commercial and the practical points of view. But 
there are many who do not believe in "patents," and 
instead of putting on gum with a self-acting gummer, 
prefer to put it on with a brush as their fathers did 
before them. For these we have just got in a stock of 
Gum Pots. They are made of imitation Crown Derby 
china, and are really things of beauty, which would be 
ornamental, either in an office or a drawing room. 
While the humble price of One Shilling brings them 
within the reach of all. 



Professor Masson in his newly published "Edinburgh 
Sketches and Memories" (price 10/6), calls attention 
to the picturesque character of Aberdeen, a character 
which some of" its sons would deny it. He says, 
"By-the-bye, why does Mrs. Burton lavish all her 
affection on Old Aberdeen, calling it 'a sweet, still, 
little place,' and dilating on the charms of its College 
and Cathedral and antique streets, while she has 
nothing more to say for New Aberdeen than that it is 
'a highly prosperous commercial city, as utterly devoid 
of beauty or interest as any city under the sun?' 
About Old Aberdeen all will agree with her ; but who 
that really knows the Granite City will agree with her 
about the New ? Is it nothing to be able to walk 
along the whole length of her noble Union Street, 



74 



Brown's Book-Stall. 




Private Gentlemen & Business Firms 

Who look to excellence and style in their 

WRITING PAPER, 



Should adopt this beautiful paper. 
It is made with 



IMPERIAL GLAZED OR PLAIN SURFACE, 

PARCHM 



T 



And is an agreeable and high-class paper 
at an ECONOMICAL PRICE. 



hot 



To be had from all ©V® 

ABERDEEN BOOKSELLERS I STATIONERS. 



RUG 



STRAPS are now in 
Season, 6d., i/, & l/6 



JMSS 



for either Cyclists or 
Tourists, or neither. 
Large Variety always 
in stock. 



A. Brown & Co., yj Union Street, Aberdeen, 



he Point 




to keep in view is that you get the 
best possible value in Stationery and 
Books from A. Brown and Co., 
7 j Union. Street, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



75 



whether on fair summer mornings, when the sun is 
shining, or again in the frosty winter nights, when the 
eye is held by the undulating perspective of the lamps, 
and the very houses glitter keenly in the starlight, and 
aurora borealis is seen dancing at its best in the north- 
ward sky over the chasm from Union Bridge? Is it 
nothing to saunter down by the bustling quays and ship- 
yards, and thence to the extreme of the harbour, 
where the great out-jutting pier of stonework com- 
mand the miles of breakers and of sandy beach to the 
left, and spikes the wrath of the German Ocean ? " 



Gladstone and his Pigeon Holes 



Ihe Review of Reviews for May, in its Character 
Sketch, gives an interesting account of Mr. Gladstone's 
method of arranging his work. It says — "Mr. Glad- 
stone reduced to perfection the science of getting a 
maximum of work out of his private secretaries. 
When Prime Minister, Mr. Gladstone kept three 
private secretaries constantly going, and the whole 
business of the office went with the precision and 
regularity of a machine. The two chief features of 
Mr. Gladstone's system were — first, that everything 
passed through Downing Street, and that all papers 
were kept there : and, secondly, that his chief secret- 
ary was informed of everything that was going. 

The First Essential 

of a private secretary is to have 

Plenty of Pigeon-floles, 

and Mr. Gladstone used to keep six nests of pigeon- 
holes constantly going. One, for instance, was set 
apart for all letters relating to the Church and to 
questions of preferment, a matter which gave Mr. 
Gladstone an infinitely greater amount of trouble than 
any one outside the inner circle could conceive. Four 
of the other nests were appropriated to special subjects, 
while the sixth was set aside as a kind of general 
rubbish-heap, into which all letters of a rubbishy 
description were summarily consigned. 

His secretaries' letters were seldom copied, the 
only record kept of the latter being Mr. Gladstone's 
memorandum of instructions on the docket. Rubbishy 
letters were taken to him once a week by the secretary 
with an endorsement showing how they had been 
answered. By this means Mr. Gladstone is able to go 
through hundreds of letters in a quarter of an hour. 
In addition to the six nests of pigeon-holes which 
were kept going from day to day there were series of 
historical pigeon-holes which were fed from the others 
by a system of periodical weedings, but so carefully 
has the system been elaborated that Mr. Gladstone 
could at any moment lay his hand on any paper that 
bad come before him at any time since first he 



entered office. Therein Mr. Gladstone differs very 
much from the late Mr. Foster, whose papers were 
often in confusion, and who would have been hope- 
lessly involved in a maze of difficulties if he had ever 
attempted to get through one-half the work which 
Mr. Gladstone performs with hardly an effort. 



Lose no time but write ^ . 

at once for our detailed •* ^___ 

list of _^ Hdes 



as mentioned on page 72. 



A. Brown & Co., 

yy Union Street, 

Aberdeen, 



! wbat must it be to be tbere!" 




F you take the light 

from the eyes of a 

sister of mercy at her 

gracious task, the smile 

of a maiden looking over the 

seas to her lover, and the 

heart of an unspoiled child, 

and materialise them into a 

winsome and healthy little 

body, crowned with a mass 

of jet black hair and dressed 

in bright rustling silks, you 

would have the typical 

-Japanese woman." — Henry 

Norman. 

"The Real Japan," by Henry 
Norman, is the newest and 
apparently one of the best books on that interesting 
country, with numerous illustrations from photographs. 
Published at io/6, Cash Price 8/. 



7 6 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



JAMES STEPHEN I SONS, 

CAl^VEI^S, (^IDDEI^S, 
(IKppoi? and Picture Rpame (Danufoctui?ei?s, 

Fine Art Publishers, Artists' Golormen, 4c, 

48, 49, & 50 WOOLMANHILL, 
^x?x ABERDEEN KeX, 

(Opposite Entrance Gate to Royal Infirmary.) 



WORKS: RODGER'S WALK. JOHN STREET. 

Telephone No. 553. 



Mirror Frames JRe-gilt ; Old Frames pe-gilt ; LVerv] Description of 

Qildirvg Work done. 




open. 



OCK CLIP FILES, 



8vo, lOd. 



4to, 1/3. 



Folio, 1/6. 



CLOSE LIKE A BOOK, AND ARE VERY CONVENIENT FOR 
STANDING ON A TABLE OR BOOK-SHELF. 



A. Brown & Co., yy Union Street, Aberdeen 



ROBERT JilNDIRSON, 33 and 35 Union Street. 



SUMMER FASHIONS. 




of JVIilHr\erv|, Marvtles, Jackets, Gapes, 
Jtabes, Dress Materials, Ghildrerv's 
Qarmer\ts, ar\d Qeneral Drapery. 



Extensive Purchases have been made for all Departments of the Warehouse, 



dressmaking, ^antlemafcing, an& ^©illtner^ 

THE MAKING-UP DEPARTMENTS are under EXPERIENCED MANAGERS, who, having visited London 
/?=^ and secured THE NEWEST STYLES, are in a position to show Ladies THE FASHIONS 
^" FOR SUMMER WEAR. 



ROBERT HEHDWSQN, 



5)raper£ Warebouseman, 

33 & 35 Wnion Street 




The 

History 

of 

Loch 
Kinnord, 



Rev. J. G. Michie. 



Price i/6, Post Free, 1/9 



A. BROWN & CO., 

77 Union Street, ABERDEEN. 



FORMS 



of Will, with direc- 
tions for making, 
3d. each. Forms 
of Affidavit and 
Claim, id. each. 
^^^^^^^^^^ Cash Receipt 

Forms, 100 for 6d. Rent Receipt Forms, 
100 for 6d. Instructions for Signing a Deed, 
6d. per dozen. House Letting Agreements, 
6d. per dozen. House Rulers, 6d. per dozen. 
Trust Deed Forms, 6d. each. 



A. Brown & Co., 

STATIONERS, 
7j Union Street, Aberdeen. 



A. S. GOOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



SPECIAL 

BLUE AND BLACK SEBGE 

SUITS, 

£3 3s. 

K per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



A. S. GOOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



THE 



BOfl-RCCOflD SfllKT. 

NeWest Designs ir\ 
FRENGH PRINTED and 
OXFOpD SHIRTINQS. 



SPECIAL LINE. 



THE 



FINEST RANGE 

OF 

THREE GUINEA 
SUITINGS. 



B0N~ACC0flD SfllftT 



FOR 



EVENING DRESS, 

5/, 6/, 7/6, and 8/6 



SPECIALTY. 

5 pei 1 cent. Discount 

For Cash. 



A. S. GOOK, 

26 MARKET STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



SPECIALTY. 

DISCOUNT 
1/- in the £ 

to Cash purchasers. 



BEAVER, WORSTED, 
and VICUNA 

SUMMER 

OVERGOATINGS, 

Newest Shades. 



Removing ft j& 



at MAY TERM to 

Xarge DOUBLE Shop, 

46 Mai^efi %\m\ 46, 

Dire Cosite POST-OFFICE. 



-H- NEWEST -H- 

DESIGNS 1 COLOURINGS 

IN 

Spring TWeeds. 



ADDRESS after 28th MAY: 

A. S. COOH, 

46 MARKET STREET, 46 
ABERDEEN. 

Opposite Post-Office. 



TROUSERS, 

16/6 A PAIR. 
5 per cent. Discount for Cash. 



ADDRESS after 28th MAY: 

A. S. GOOK, 

46 MARKET STREET, 46 
ABERDEEN. 

Opposite Post-Office. 




No. 6. 



JUNE. 



(lorn Britisl and JJeniaie Iprap Co, 

IN WHICH IS NOW MERGED 

THE SCOTTISH PROVINCIAL RSSUWCE CO. 



FIRE, L IFE, AND ANN UITIES. 

Incorporated by 'Eoyat Charter and Special Acts of 'Parliament. 

Total Assets exceed £ 1 0,500,000. 

The Funds of the L,ife Department are not liable for obligations under the 
Fire Department, nor are the Funds of the Fire Department liable for obligations 
under the Life Department. In this Company, therefore, the Investments for the 
Life Department are kept entirely separate from those of the Fire Department, as 
set forth in the Balance Sheet. 



Income for 1891, 



£2,650,530. 



Hberfceen Boarfc. 



GEORGE COLLIE, Esq., Advocate. 
JAMES F. LUMSDEN, Esq., Advocate. 
ALEX. M. 0GST0N, Esq. of Ardoe. 



WILLIAM YEATS, Esq. of Auquhakney. 
JOHN WHYTE, Esq., Advocate. 
JOHN COOK, Esq., Banker. 



Local Manager— GEORGE W. W. BARCLAY. 
Fire Superintendent— D. B. MILNE. 

Prospectuses and full information as to several important features recently introduced can be obtained at the 

Chief Offices, Branches, and Agencies. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

Edinburgh — 64 Princes Street ; London — 61 Threadneedle Street, E.C. 

Aberdeen Office: 91 UNION STREET, 



We can't afford to give away 

Note Paper 



— • for Nothing; 

But we do supply One Pound of CLUB VELLUM NOTE PAPER 
for 6^d., and One Hundred Envelopes too Match for 6*/£d. 



CALL AND SEE IT OR WRITE FOR A SAMPLE. 





A. BrOWn & CO., 77 Union Street, 

Stationers, ♦ ♦ ♦ Aberdeen. 

By Special Appointment Patronised by 

Ro yal China Saloo ns 

To The Queen. ^ H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 

John Ford & Co., 

©lass and China (DeFchanfs, 

136 & 138 Union Street, 
«x5x aberdeen. k^k, 

^Ise at 39 pMnees Street, and r^elureeel Gj-lass wanks, 

eX5x eb + |vIblIf((^H- >^k* 




No. 6. 



brown's Bberfceen Boofc*StalL 



JUNE. 



1892. 



No. VI. 



BY the close of the 
century, Mr. Brown's 
confidence in him- 
self, increased by his 
fifteen years' experience in 
business, had secured 
success, and en- 
abled him to 
firmly plant his 
feet up two 
or three rungs 
of the social 
ladder. "For- 
wards,"the cele- 
brated motto of 
Marshal Blu- 
cher, had long 
Cross as used as Post-Office up to 1841. been familiar 
to young Scotchmen ; like Longfellow's 
aspiring hero, but with less bravado, their 
course was always "Onwards and Upwards," 
and so was Mr. Brown's ; and the quiet 
prudent course he adopted of securing a wide 
business connection, a good social position, 
and the respect and esteem of his fellow- 
citizens had already won for him (in 1796) 
the presidentship of the St. Andrew's Society, 
which comprised the elite of the city. This 
office he held frequently, and from his social 
qualities always with much acceptance. 




As commander of the "Book-Stall" he had 
hitherto sailed his craft in comparatively 
tranquil waters, but there were then ahead 
some rocks and shoals in the political and 
social conditions of the day, which had 
better be noticed here. 

According to current history, George III. 
was then King of England. But as Professor 
Masson, in a brilliant essay, recently reprinted, 
shows, the virtual King of Scotland from 1783 
to 1806, was Henry Dundas, known after- 
wards as first Viscount Melville. He was 
the colleague of Pitt, and his right-hand man. 
In one hand Dundas held the power of 
coercion by despotic civil and military law, in 
the other he had the whole government patron- 
age of Scotland ; and thus equipped, he 
engaged, not only to keep the country quiet, 
but to bring all its influence to the support of 
the Tory government. And it was much 
easier to deal with the electors then, than 
now ; when one, or either of the two divisions 
of Aberdeen, has a larger number of voters 
than what then existed in the whole of Scot- 
land j its forty-five members — thirty for the 
counties, and fifteen for the burghs — being 
then elected by about two thousand voters. 
"Popular representation was unknown, and 
election was a farce." The burgh member 
for Aberdeen represented Inverbervie, Mont- 
rose, Arbroath, and Brechin also, each burgh 
having by its Town Council a single vote, and 
each representative one fifth of an M.P. 
The prizes of office in church and state, the 
bench and the bar, the army and navy, at 
home or abroad, in churches or schools — 
even the humblest post in the excise or the 



78 



Brown's Book-Stall. 









If 



* 



ft 



\ ■;,■■ 



&>> 




"■■■■ 



English jy^anufacturcs 

To Consumers of Kq\j> 



^X OFFICE & DRAW1NQ PENCILS. 

T TSE only Pencils of ENGLISH MANUFACTURE. 

They are Superior in every respect to those of Foreign make. 



Bank of Enolano 

Pure Cumberland Lead 

Spanish (3rapbite 
TEouobeneb Xeao 

For Draughtsmen 



fyeneik 



ARE SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED. 

They are made by Skilled Workmen. KqK^ 

.iXsX Extra Valae and Quality Guaranteed. 



> 



C[. Wolff & &on, 

B|anufacf!ui t e^ to Jler* MajegfeiJ'g IqoVer'nment! \ the Banl^ of England, 
jSTEAM PENCIL CHOCKS, 

Battersea, London, s .w. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



79 



janitor in a public building — were all reserved 
for Tories. Repression of opinion was 
carried to its utmost limit, and there resulted 
the appearance of almost entire political 
stagnation — but not of thought. 

As the religious life of the period ran 
mostly underground, so did the profession of 
what we would term the most moderate 
liberalism. Exclusion from office, favour 
and patronage, for too free expression of 
opinion was the least punishment, as our 
national poet found to his cost. Spies were 
employed to evoke, and note it, trials for 
sedition awaited it, and sentences of fines, 
imprisonment, or transportation resulted from 
it. And yet, even yet, the covenanting spirit 
running in the blood, Scotchmen would not 
have been what they were and are, without 
an opposition. This had a few representatives 
in the higher classes, who were idolised by 
the lower classes as much as those in office 
were hated, but it was largely supported 
by all Dissenters, whose firmly held religious 
opinions subjected them, not only to disfavour, 
but to obloquy and persecution. Naturally 
this tended to make them radicals of an 
advanced type, and also, and unfortunately, it 
tended to foster amongst them not a little 
bigotry and intolerance, for which society 
was really to blame more than they were. 

As Professor Masson says, "It was a 
country without political life, without public 
meetings, without newspapers, without hust- 
ings; could any endurable existence be led 
in such a set of conditions, could any good 
come out of it ?" And yet, as he says, it was 
a very jolly time, for lairds, "moderate" 
ministers, provosts, baillies, and generally for 
people in power. Certainly it produced quite 
a remarkable crop of eminent men, and 
memorably good stories. Then, men dressed 
in a little brief authority, rushed in where 
angels would now fear to tread. A product 
of the time, our Aberdeen Baillie Duthie, was 
in office, when a porter whom he had em- 
ployed was found fault with by him ; and in 
reply, the porter gave the Baillie a good bit 
of his mind, and called him no end of un- 
complimentary terms. Next day on his way 
to the court, the Baillie espied the porter on 
the Plainstanes in Castle Street, and telling 



Simon Grant, his officer, to arrest him, in a 
few minutes the astonished porter found him- 
self in the dock, facing the irate Baillie, who 
thus addressed him. "Noo't I've got you 
here, my mannie, wi'd ye jist say to me enoo' 
fat ye said yesterday ? an' my certy, bit I'se 
sort ye ! " Here history is unfortunately 
silent as to the reply of the porter. It is 
likely that he was discreet, and that the 
Baillie had the best of it in the circumstances, 
and got his innings for the time. The porter 
was a type of the liberal politicians of the 
period ; he, and they in the far north finding 
out long before Carlyle found it, that if 
"speech was silvern, silence was golden," 
that it was dangerous to speak out, if they 
were in opposition to the powers that be, and 
that there was a time for everything under 
the sun. 

But self-contradictory although it seems, 
not only for people in power, but for the 
general community, it appears to have been 
"a jolly time." In the dark days of slavery 
nothing so pleased the planters as to hear the 
sounds of mirth and revelry in the huts of 
their slaves. So long as this continued they 
believed themselves safe, and to promote it 
they provided a liberal allowance of rum. 
And as all men on the face of the earth are 
of one blood, just so in Scotland, — if Henry 
Dundas the virtual king, was a despot, his 
prime minister was Whisky-toddy, and for 
banishing thought, and drowning care, was 
there ever his equal ? If there were no public 
meetings allowed in the city, there were plenty 
of private ones, where the prime minister was 
present and freely accessible. County Club 
assemblies ; dinners at elections* ; Synod 
and Presbytery dinners ; bachelor and regi- 
mental balls for the select ; and for the rank 
and file of the citizens of all grades, any 
amount of sociality. 

There were nine Mason Lodges, whose 
secret word, for convivial purposes, was 
quietly well known to be "Fork out." There 
were seven Friendly Societies, with large 
accumulated funds, whose expenditure in 



*The election of the Aberdeen M.P. in 1830 was at Bervie(!) 
when there was an immense assemblage of people from the 
neighbourhood, "who were amply regaled with good cheer." — 
Chronicle, August 23, 1830. 



8c 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



TRY. 



bittlejokrv & Son's 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness, 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 



RUG 



STRAPS are now in 

Season, 6d., i/, & l/6 



PAPS 



for either Cyclists or 
Tourists, or neither. 
Large Variety always 
in stock. 



A. Brown & Co., yy Union Street, Aberdeen, 



John Heaths Pens 




iispatch PEN S/e OFFICIAL PEN F.M.B S/ g F. M. B., 2/6 

Sample Box (24 kinds) and List, 7 stamps, BIRMINGHAM. 



^ 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



81 






conviviality was put a stop to by the Govern- 
ment Inspector when these societies were 
looked into. There was the antiquated 
Guildry with its celebrated Wine Fund, 
somewhat mythical and shadowy, but now 
solidly represented by the lands of Shedocks- 
ley and others ; and the Incorporated Trades 
with its proverbial hospitality, neither shadowy 
nor mythical, but tangible and widely 
experienced. Admirably managed, its ac- 
cumulated wealth enabled it with a free 
hand to eclipse all Dean Ramsay's stories of 
Scottish hospitality. It had a public house 
of its own; it brewed potent ale for the 
citizens; its very snacks of " bread and 
cheese" at committee meetings had strange 
and staggering effects, and if at convivial 
meetings it did not provide an attendant to 
unloose the neckties of those who fell under 
the table, it did better, for as advancing years 
brought increasing wisdom, it provided com- 
fortable lairs for its guests on their final 
decease ; killing them with kindness, burying 
them with profit, and with tenderest care, and 
for a small consideration, now undertaking to 
keep their memories evergreen. 

There was the Society of Advocates, and 
of Writers, each with "recherche" dinners, 
and the Medical Society, which discussed 
more than dry bones;— the Philosophical 
Society which, following the example of the 
clerics met in the " Lemon Tree," and with 
the "prime minister" and Professor Blackie 
both present, their dry and abstruse discus- 
sions became luminous and brilliant after 
supper ; the ancient Pynours (vulgo the Shore 
Porters, traditionally reported to have dis- 
charged the cargo from Noah's Ark), who by 
imbibing their appropriately named malt 
liquor at proper times, and rising early in the 
morning became " healthy, wealthy, and wise." 
And it would be unpardonable to omit the 
Town Council, whose membership was choice 
and select, while its stock of wines, etc., under 
the charge of John Home was large and com- 
prehensive. Has he not been represented as 
singing thus : — 

"In guid times auld, when days were cauld, 
Wi' sleet, an' sna', an' a' that, 
The Cooncil board was aye weel stored 
Wi' something nice, an' a' that. 



An' a' that, an' a' that, 

Wi' sherry, port, an' a' that ; 
Aft Baillies spak' wi' draps o' that 
Like Solomons, an' a' that." 

The loss to the world is thus simply incon- 
ceivable, but it is very questionable whether 
the wisdom could have been drawn by wild 
horses, steam pumps, or even modern report- 
ers. Wherever the post of danger was, — 
wherever knives and forks were being plied, 
and liquor was flowing, there the Magistrates 
were bound to be. Upon every business of 
the slightest importance the city purse was 
available, and was freely drawn upon for con- 
viviality; a stingy Treasurer was, if possible, 
worse than a Dissenter; and to the economists 
and Trades' Councillors of that day, life 
must have been one continual purgatory, 
hardly worth living. 

The list of societies given is only a sample; 
there were many others ranging through all 
ranks, and allowing all classes to form them- 
selves into congenial coteries; undisturbed by 
Forbes Mackenzie, they met in the inns at all 
seasons and hours. A similar state of things 
exists in Germany at present, where meetings 
of all kinds, literary and scientific, political and 
musical, religious and benevolent, announced 
from the press and pulpit, are held in beer 
saloons, and where the consumption of Lager 
beer is something almost fabulous, so much 
so, that, one of their authors has characterised 
his countrymen as "beer barrels in the morn- 
ing, and barrels of beer at night." If, as am- 
bassadors tell us, some of the most important 
treaties in the world have been floated by 
champagne, it is no wonder that drink was the 
accompaniment of births, marriages, and 
funerals, of every business transaction, every 
rise in life, and almost every gathering. On 
the founding of any building, and the com- 
pletion of every work, drink money was 
always looked for, over and above the regular 
payment. It was the fruitful source of many 
mad pranks, of outrageous conduct, of con- 
stant brawls, of much domestic misery, and 
great loss of life. 

The boom of these societies, of ancient 
existence, culminated about this time, and the 
inevitable reaction began by the formation of 
the Temperance Society. It had hard uphill 



82 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Jelegrams— "LORIMER, BOOTMAKER, /ABERDEEN; 



James Mmer & Son, 

Boot & Shoe Saloons, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 

157 Union Street, Aberdeen, 



UAVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, 

including every variety of 

IBoots, JShoes, and £51i£>£>ers 

For Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 

In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly on hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shooting, Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ©c&ers ot Evei£ ^Description /Ifcafce to /Ifceasure, 




^ piDlNQ BOOTS. 
FIELD BOOTS. 



FISH1NQ BOOTS. 
LIVERY BOOTS. 



SHOOTINQ BOOTS. <jfij& 
HIQHLAND B^OQUES 



5 per Cent. Discount for Cash Payments. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



§3 



work for many years, and but for the indomi- 
table energy of its promoters, aided by the 
newly awakened intelligence caused by dis- 
cussions on the Reform Bill, it would have 
sunk under the ridicule which it excited at 
first. Generation after generation had in- 
dulged in strong drink, all classes had en- 
couraged smuggling, and habits were formed 
which by heredity still injuriously affects 
society. 

And now, these rocks and shoals having 
been put down on the chart, we note that in. 
1 80 1 the office of Distributor of Stamps for 
Aberdeen and Kincardine Shires became vac- 
ant, and as apart from its emoluments it 
would bring customers, Mr. Brown became one 
of the candidates for the appointment. Seeing 
how patronage was them administered, it will 
not be wondered at although patrons made the 
very utmost of the appointments they con- 
ferred, and that the terms were somewhat 
strange and unsatisfactory. The previous 
holder, Mr. Auldjo, had received it subject to 
an annual payment of ^180 to Provost Dun- 
can, his predecessor. And the very hard 
bargain was now attempted to be driven by 
Ferguson of Pitfour, the county M.P., that Mr. 
Brown should receive only five-twelfths of the 
income, the remainder to be divided between 
the nominees of the patron, a Mr. and Mrs. 
Durno, and Mr. and Mrs. Auldjo, and their 
assignees. Mr. Brown having represented 
that the large annuity for four lives was unduly 
burdensome, but that the introduction of 
assignees was simply intolerable ; this last 
was departed from, and he was appointed, 
giving then a cautionary bond of ^3000 for 
his intromissions. But on the first settlement 
of accounts, when it was proposed to disallow 
his office expenses, and to take from him the 
seven-twelfths of the gross proceeds, (which 
amounted to about ^430), he very properly 
resented and resisted this. His idea of the 
value of the appointment was a shrewd and 
thoroughly commercial one ; he was willing 
to pay ;£i6o per annum for the office, or 
resign it on receipt of ^120 per annum. In 
the dispute the much respected Mr. Irvine of 
Drum was chosen arbitrator with full powers, 
and to Mr. Brown's glad relief, it was settled 
that after deduction of £80 per annum for 



office expenses, the Durnos were to receive 
^32, and the Auldjos ^24 per annum, thus 
entirely discarding the absurd proportionate 
payment of unearned increments to these 
parties, and making the appointment one 
which could bear examination better. So 
much did the use of stamps increase in Aber- 
deen, that in twenty years after it was more 
than four times its then amount. 

William Farquhar who had charge of the 
stamp department for about thirty years, was 
said to have been an original character. His 
rude, but effective method of checking the 
sale of stamps was by keeping each descrip- 
tion of stamps in a separate drawer, and as 
they were sold, putting in the cash received 
for them — the drawer thus checked itself. 

It was in August, 1801, that Forbes Frost, 
then a boy of twelve, the son of a gardener 
at Dudwick in Buchan, entered as an appren- 
tice. He rose afterwards to be a partner, and 
for many years prior to his death in 1845, was 
the practical steersman of the "Book-Stall." 

It has been already mentioned that the 
development of a stationery business was 
sadly hindered by all account books having 
to be procured from Edinburgh, or the 
paper sent there to be ruled to the desired 
pattern. Mr. Brown was already a book- 
binder ; he was desirous to manufacture 
account books, and he aspired to be a paper- 
maker also. So along with Mr. Chalmers 
this last business was started at the Craiglug, in 
1804, but by the action of the tidal water the 
manufacture proving unsuccessful, the build- 
ings were sold in 1807 to the Devanha 
Brewery Co. 

Like a true wife who has her husband's 
interest at heart, the thrifty, prudent, yet 
energetic Mrs. Brown came to the rescue. 
She purchased a ruling machine from Ben. J. 
Fleet of London for ^35, and her receipt 
bears that this "includes instructing her in 
the art of ruling." (Parenthetically, and 
simply to save the reader from interjecting it, 
was it not dog-cheap at the price ? For how 
many women, wives, and mothers would gladly 
pay far more than this to acquire this practical 
and dearly loved power ?) Being the rirst 
machine of the kind north of Edinburgh, its 
working was kept as secret as possible, and 



8 4 



Brown's Book- Stall. 




^t/^j 0\/P T? Q of the Fine Arts ' we offer 

A ^<-s J-^ V-X V \-Lt J\0 a Special Bargain of 3 vols. 
^=^=^^==^=^== of The Portfolio^ bound in 
cloth and gilt-edged. Each volume contains 36 full-page Etchings, 
besides numerous Illustrations through the text. The published price 
is T,6j - per volume, and we offer them at 15/- per volume, or 42/- for 
the three. 

A 1 O (~\ The Barbizon School — Corot, Rousseau, Diaz, 
/iLOvJ Millet, Daubigny, etc. — by D. C. Thomson. 
=== 130 Illustrations. Large Paper Edition, a really 



beautiful book, 55/. 

SPECIAL. 



A Series of 37 Etchings by Lalauze, 
the famous French etcher, in illustra- 
== tion of "Don Quixote." India paper 
proofs, only 20 printed, of which this is No. 3. Offered a Special 



Bargain at 15/. 

FOR SALE. 



New Spalding Club Publica- 
tions. Vols. I. to VI. for £6. 



-<5-"*X**-9- 



An XL* r* 11 Union Street 

. Brown & Co., n _ AU , 

— -© Aberd 



Aberdeen. 



BALL- 



HEWITT'S PATENT 

POINTED 



PENS 



Are constructed on a scientific basis. A rolling ball has of all bodies the greatest momentum 
with the least resistance. Applied to pen points the outcome is astonishingly pleasant. There 
are twelve varieties of Ball-Pointed Pens, which, experience proves, will suit all hands, 
The following are the most popular — For Book-keeping, 516EF, 52 if. ; For General Corres- 
pondence, 516F., 526M. ; For Fluent Writing, 532F., 537M. 

If uncertain — buy an assorted box, and choose a pen to suit your hand. 
While at your stationer's also ask for a 

"FEDERATION" PENHOLDER. 




It prevents the pen from blotting when laid on the desk, and gives a firm and comfortable 

grip for the fingers. 



Manufactured for ORMISTON & GLASS, LONDON, 

AND SUPPLIED BY ALL STATIONERS. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



85 



certainly, it was far more so kept than most 
secrets entrusted to females. It was placed 
in an attic, under lock and key, and the strict- 
est surveillance kept over its working, lest any 
one should see it ; and there, assisted by a 
female servant, at early morn, and dewy eve, 
Mrs. Brown, for years, kept things straight in 
Aberdeen. All honour to her ! long before 
her husband was known in the gates, or sat 
amongst the magistrates as their chief, she, 
adorned in a meek and quiet spirit, through 
good works, ruled well in every department 
committed to her, and by example taught 
others. Is it any wonder that her husband 
praised her, and that her children for genera- 
tions still call her blessed ? In all the relations 
of life she was respected and honoured as a 
noble woman, a faithful helpmeet, and a godly 
mother, with quiet, yet firm traits of religious 
principle, and a Bunyan-like piety, possibly the 
inheritance from a female ancestor, Mrs. Jean 
Chalmers who lived a hundred years pre- 
viously. 

It is difficult to realise now the interest 
which this bold procedure on the part of Mrs. 
Brown excited in the then small community, 
and specially amongst the other booksellers. 
But so long as it was considered necessary the 
secret was well kept, and the business so 
prospered that another larger and finer ma- 
chine had soon to be procured which cost 
^"50, and extra assistants, including her son 
William, had to be trained. Then, an errand 
boy, James - Brownie, was taught, and so it 
continued, until other machines having been 
introduced, and Brownie having the misfortune 
to lose his leg, the flourishing business was 
ultimately handed over to him, and for many 
years he was the principal ruler to the "trade." 
Latterly he became a slave to opium eating, 
keeping a lump always beside him, and 
continually nibbling away at it, as if it had 
been liquorice, and paying in days and nights 
of unmitigated misery the unutterable fearful 
penalties which this vice exacts from its 
votaries. 

Before he became an entire wreck, bodily 
and mentally, he had engaged as an assistant, 
a boy named James Emslie, who had some- 
times to act as a keeper at night, when 
Brownie had taken an extra dose, which 



seemed to act on him as a stimulant, and not 
a narcotic, and fearful nights they were. To 
this boy, Mr. Frost formed a strong attach- 
ment, and got him apprenticed to D. Chalmers 
and Co., as a printer, stipulating that he 
should always be the messenger between the 
printers and the "Book-Stall." On the expiry 
of his apprenticeship Emslie went to London, 
soon got into the employment of the Bank 
of England, where he speedily rose to be the 
head of their stationery and printing depart- 
ment, every Note having to pass under his 
inspection, and this year (1892), he has 
retired with the respect of all the officials, and 
with a suitable pension in return for his long 
and faithful service. Of course, he attributes 
his success in life, first, to his having been born 
in Aberdeen, next, to oatmeal and the Shorter 
Catechism, and last, but not least, to his con- 
nection with "Brown's Aberdeen Book- Stall." 



Clubs in Hberfceen at tbe BeGtnnfnc} 
of tbe Genturg, 



As has been already said, they were numerous, and 
traces of them are frequently met with. In these days 
of a cheap, daily, almost hourly press, the clubs have 
died of pure inanition. Had the modern reporter been 
in existence then, what a flood of light would have 
been thrown on the social life of the period ! Here is 
an unconsidered trifle which points out the character- 
istics of some men of the time, and all well known. 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE MOGUL CLUB 
An Address to Baillie Littlejohn. 



To be said or sung at their first full meeting 
in Widow Andersons. 



Tune — "Away with Melancholy." 



Sir Baillie, Sir Baillie, I'll tell ye, I'll tell ye, 
That your head to the ancients belongs ; 
Father Care you have scared, 
Chained Old Time by the beard — 
May you long have your jests and your songs, 

Sir Baillie. 

Bank Sandy, Bank Sandy, so quiet and handy, 
Why yours is a mystified plan ; 
Yet wonders are wrought, 
And would you take thought, 
You might still be a marrying man, 

Bank Sandy. 



86 Brown's Book-Stall. 










guvi 

Cabinet /nbafcecs anb XUpbolsterecs, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shorn tyooms a t ^^ ^ 

^m^ 257 milOJl STREET, 

and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and 29.j£>holsterg Goods. 



Qbe Cabinet jf UVnitUrC made in their own Workshop wil 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



Zhcix IRew Carpet Saloon is stocked with k the , 

best makes of 

British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums, 
Mattings, Rugs, &c, 
~m~ Curtains and Upholstery Materials. 

IbOlbUtn Cabinet WOrkS are now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



87 



Friend Homer, Friend Homer, I mean no misnomer, 
Do you know ? — I don't know if 'tis slander — 
But they say you declare, 
Look confounded and stare, 
Pop puns, and dash double entendre, 

Friend Homer. 

Jolly James, Jolly James, when the dreamer of dreams 
Calls his worm-eaten scarecrows to battle, 
Let Soup Maigrc alone, 
We'll soon bring him to bone, 
Mighty Mars! how we'll carve his lean cattle, 

Jolly James. 

Brother Mill, Brother Mill, what! a devotee still; 
O how few have the grace to repent ! 
To St. Andrew and John, 
Your devotions are known, 
And in time you'll be crowned for a saint, 

Brother Mill. 

Rambling Willie, Rambling Willie, your'e a curious billie, 
Had the poet the skill to define you ; 
Both good humoured and trusty — 
Yet if once you get crusty, 
Ev'n old Dickie himself wont divine you, 

Rambling Willie. 

Dr. Sage, Dr. Sage, thou bright gem of the age ! 
Sent by Jove this dark orb to enlighten ; 
Dare we venture to gaze? 
So effulgent your rays, 
Ten to one our dull wits you would frighten, 

Dr. Sage. 

Daft Lyall, Daft Lyall, when you entered on tryal 
To pass muster you'd no cause to doubt ; 
You're as truly a brother 
As one pea to another ; 
But I pray you, remember the Gout, 

Daft Lyall. 



H Jew in Hberfceen- 



Whether in credit or discredit, to Aberdeen it has 
often been said that no Jew can make a living in the 
"Silver City." But itwas not always so. Fortyyearsago 
a German Jew named Lazarus Myers was a well-known 
character in the streets and in the Small Debt Court, 
lie would transact any kind of business with any one, 
would buy or sell old clothes, sell, or buy, or swap 
watches, or lend money on good security — that was a 
requisite. His appearance in the Small Debt Court 
generally arose from his having sold articles to servants 
or others to be paid by instalments, when, if they 
failed in their payments, they were pulled up in 
Court. 

On one occasion, having got decree for 9/- against 
a fair customer who pled inability to pay, he drew out 
of his pocket a note signed by the defender, which 



read thus — " 14th December, 1830. Bot. of Lazarus 
Myers, two silk napkins, which I promise to pay in 14 
days from this date : " and showing this to the Court, he 
said — " Dat is the vey dey get on, me Lor ! dis der 
voman could 'ave vorn a cotton napkin — a goot von 
she could 'ave got for 6d ; yet she must 'ave silk — 
pride and poverty — vy take me in, ven she could not 
pay ? Eh, dat is a bad vay — people should buy and 
vear as dey are able, and no more — not vear great and 
den plead poor." Lazarus made money not only for 
his residence here, but retired to live in ghetto at 
Hamburg on his savings. 



Blunders In tbe Bible, 



PECULIAR ERRORS IN VARIOUS EDITIONS OF THE 
HOLY SCRIPTURES. 



The Breeches Bible. — "Then the eies of them both were 
opened, and they knew that they were naked, and they sewed 
figge tree leaves together and made themselves breeches." Gen. 
iii. 7. Printed 1560. 

The Bug Bible. — " So that thou shalt not nede to be afraid 
for any Bugges by nighte, nor for the arrow that flyeth by day. 
Ps. xci. 5. Printed 1561. 

The Treacle Bible. — "Is there no treacle at Gilead? Is 
there no physician there?" Jer. viii. 22. Printed 1568. 

The Rosin Bible. — "Is there no rosin in Gilead? Is there 
no physician there?" Jer. viii. 22. Printed 1609. 

The Place- Makers' Bible. — " Blessed are the place-makers 
for they shall be' called the children of God." Matt. v. 9. 
Printed 1561-2. 

The Vinegar Bible. — "The Parable of the Vinegar," instead 
of "The Parable of the Vineyard," appears in the chapter 
heading of Luke xx. in an Oxford edition of the Authorised 
Version which was published in 1771. 

The Wicked Bible. — This extraordinary name was given to 
an edition of the Authorised Bible, printed in London by Robert 
Barker and Martin Lucas in 1631. The negative was left out of 
the seventh commandment, and William Kilburne, writing in 
1659, says that owing to the zeal of Dr. Usher the printer was 
fined ^2000 or ,£3000. 

The Ears-to-Ear Bible. — "Who hath ears to ear, let him 
ear." Matt. xiii. 43. Printed 1810. 

The Standing- Fishes Bible. — "And it will come to pass that 
the fishes will stand upon it," etc. Ezek. xlvii. 10. Printed 
1806. 

The Discharge Bible. — "I discharge thee before God." 
1 Tim. v. 21. Printed 1806. 

The Wife-Hater Bible. — "If any man come unto me, and 
hate not his father . . . yea, and his own wife also," etc. 
Luke xiv. 26. Printed 1810. 

Rcbekah's Camels Bible. — "And Rebekah arose, and her 
camels." Genesis xxiv. 61. Printed 1823. 

To-Remain Bible. — " Persecuted him that was born after the 
Spirit to remain, even so it is now." Gal. iv. 29. 



88 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



• ffiutnmer + Games. • 

Lawn Tennis. — Children's Rackets from 1/9. Full-sized Rackets from 5/6. 
Nets, Balls, Bags, Markers, Presses, &c, &c. 

CPOQUet. — Again very popular; 12/6 to 50/. 

Lawn BowlS, Aunt Sally, Hurlingham, Cricket, &c. 

A NOVelty. — Youths' Golf Clubs, 6d., 1/, 3/6. 



Children's CaPS. — Reliable Make, 12/6 to 47/6. 

Folding* ChaiPS* Camp Stools, Hammocks, Japanese Lawn Umbrellas. 

Travelling* BagS, Dressing Cases, and other Holiday Requisites. 



Collie & Taylor, 



Bon-Keeopci Bapap, 
TeleP No ne 57!) . 12 3 Qnlon Street. 



Dortable Book Shelves, 

Which can be easily taken to pieces and 
packed in small compass. 



2/6 



The "Student's "Book Shelf. Polished 
Light Oak Colour. Size, 16 inches 
high by 20 inches long, with 2 Shelves. 



The "Cottage" Book Shelf with 3 Shelves. 
22 inches by 22 inches. Polished Dark 
Oak Colour. 



5/ 



10/6 



The "College" Book Shelf, with 
3 Shelves. 28^ by 25 inches. 
Polished Dark Oak Colour. 



The " Referee" Book Shelf, with 
4 Shelves. 39 by 30 inches. 
Polished Dark Oak Colour. 



18/6 



A. BROWN & CO., "-ST" 1 



3uet 80 



Happy's the man who, realizing Dour and dismal, sorrowing sad, 
The life of trade is advertising, This man growls that trade is bad ; 



( ) 



U-J 



Wisely displays to one and all How could it e'er be otherwise? 
His stock of wares in Brown's He never once did advertise. 

Bookstall. 
And terms for advertisements in Book-Stall may be obtained 
from A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



SECOND- 
HAND 



Cyclostyle 



FOR 
SALE, 



insr g-ooid oirideir. 
New Price, 25/, Reduced to |Q/6 



I BROWN 8 CO., 11 UNION STREET. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



89 





& 



" Take heed ; have open eye. ' 



f^T is said to be unsafe 

to prophesy unless you 

know ; but we risk the 

prediction that we will 

sell more of "The White 

Company," by A. Conan Doyle, 

this season, than of any other 

novel — not excepting even ' ' The 

Little Minister" or "David 

Grieve," both of which are doing 

well. 

"The White Company" has 
been compared by some to 
"Ivanhoe," but except that they 
are both tales of England of the 
Middle Ages, and that they are 
both very good tales, they have 
very little in common. The price 
is 6/, cash 4/6. 



"Are you fond of fiction?" asked Alpha. "Oh 
yes," responded Omega, "the first thing I read when 
I get the daily paper is the weather prediction." 



Mr. Quaritch insists upon the great importance of 
the second-hand book trade, and defends the existence 
of the knock-out system at auctions. In India, he 
says, there are no second-hand books. As soon as a 
gentleman dies his books are sold as waste paper. 
Second-hand booksellers are most industrious men ; 
their energy is boundless, and their memory fabulous ; 
indeed, so marvellous is their knowledge of books — 
their authors, titles, binding, publishers, and date — 
that some of these men are like a huge reference 
catalogue which opens sponanteously at the exact page 
and entry wanted. 



"If it were customary in this country to confer 
titles upon men who rank in literature, what would I 
be?" asked a conceited journalist of his senior, 
" Barren of Ideas," was the terse reply. — Si/tings. 



Messrs. Oliphant's Shilling Series of Books is the 
cheapest and one of the best we know. How such 
books are produced is mysterious. About 200 pages 
of thick paper, admirable printing, a neat wrapper, 
and good healthy, new literature — the thing is beyond 
u s . — British Weekly. 



The extraordinary success of this Popular Shilling 
Series, which now contains 44 Volumes, has led the 
Publishers to start a New Series, under the general 
title of " Pocket Novels." In this Series they propose 
to issue Works by the Best Authors, printed on good 
paper, of a size convenient for the Pocket, to sell at 
1/-, cash 9d. ; or in Cloth binding, 1/6, cash i/i|. 
"A Bachelor in Search of a Wife." By Annie S. 
Swan is the first volume of the new series and is just 
ready. 



Said a High Church and athletic curate to Low 
Church ditto — "Wonderful things Grace does!" "Ah," 
said the latter (surprised at the serious observation 
from his volatile friend), "Terue, my friend, terue." 
First Curate — "Only fancy, y'know, ninety-two and 
not out ! ! " 

Customer — "Ah, I say, have you any books or 
Cricket ? " Shopman — " No, nothing except Dickens' 
'Cricket on the Hearth.'" Enthusiast — " Well give 
me that." 



on 



We observe that the June number of our esteemed 
contemporary, The Printers, Stationers, and Kindred 
Trades' Effective Advertiser, contains an appreciative 
sketch of Mr. J. G. Emslie, who, as will be seen by 
our Book-Stall article this month, began his connection 
with " The Trade " in the Book-Stall. The Effective 
gives also a very good portrait of this worthy Aberdon- 



When Matthew Arnold was Inspector of Schools, 
he once set a class of boys to write an essay on 
"Oliver Cromwell." One youth, after enlarging 



9° 



Brown's Book-Stall. 




Private Gentlemen & Business Firms 

Who look to excellence and style in their 

WRITING PAPER, 



Should adopt this beautiful paper. 
It is made with 



IMPERIAL GLAZED OR PLAIN SURFACE, 

PARCHM 



T 



And is an agreeable and high-class paper 
at an ECONOMICAL PRICE. 



mot: 



To be had from all dTv© 

ABERDEEN BOOKSELLERS I STATIONERS. 






If 

you 

Want 



R Good Book 



To read on your holidays or in the train, 
or in fact anywhere, go to A. Brown & Co., 
j j Union Street, who have all the best new 
books, both light and heavy, fact or fiction, 



fe^Jii 



Wo guit Yon. 



casonable Prices and Good Work 



R 



W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers, 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberfceen. 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries." 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



91 



diffusely on the merits of the great Commonwealth 
maker, though not without a suspicion all throughout 
that he had not altogether disentangled his personality 
from that of other famous Englishmen, concluded by 
this statement : — " One of the last recorded utterances 
of Cromwell was to the effect that if he had served 
his God as he had served his king, he would not have 
left him in his old age in the power of his enemies." — 
Australasian Schoolmaster. 



The most notable novels run to amazing lengths, as 
witness "Don Quixote," "Clarissa," " Ivanhoe," 
"David Copperfield," "The Newcomes," "Middle- 
march," "The Cloister and the Hearth," "Le Vicomte 
de Bragelonne," " Monte Cristo," "Les Miserables," 
"Le Crime et le Chatiment," "La Guerre et la Paix." 
— Speaker. 

The following is the reply which a man sent to a 
bill from his bookseller: — "I never ordered the book; 
if I did you didn't send it ; if you sent it I never got 
it ; if I got it I paid for it ; if I didn't I won't." 



Dean Swift bestowed the name of "John Bull" 
upon the typical Englishman. In his history of 
Europe he satirizes England under that name. 



People who borrow trouble never have far to go. 
In fact, they borrow the most of it from themselves. 
It's a very poor way to get into debt. 



Cigars made of paper soaked in tobacco juice are 
are the latest American invention. The time is 
evidently near at hand when a man will be able, after 
reading his Society paper, to disinfect himself by 
smoking it. — Pick-me-up. 



/HM9Stonat£ Ibumour. 



Mr. Luke, the missionary, told at the recent Synod 
some amusing incidents of his journey up the Cross 
river. The inquisitiveness and greed of some of the 
negroes were illustrated by the story of an old chief 
who envied a certain bottle in Mr. Luke's possession. 
After looking at it for a long time, the chief asked if 
he might be allowed to taste it. " Take it all if you 
like," said Mr. Luke. The chief drank the bottle 
empty. It was castor oil. "Next morning," said 
Mr. Luke, " we had some sharp words." 



"IRemo me impune lacessit." 




VERY Scotchman, of course, 
knows that on one critical 
occasion the thistle proved 
to be as useful as the Roman 
geese when the Gauls were storming 
the Capitol. Some time or other, in 
the dim mists of antiquity, the Danes or the Norse- 
men — for legendary history is not clear upon the 
point — stole upon the Scots unperceived in the dead 
of night. As their spies were trying to discover the 
undefended points of the camp, one of them chanced 
to tread upon a specimen of the stemless thistle, 
whereupon the "swearing at large" which naturally 
ensued woke the sleeping Scots, and saved them from 
their imminent peril. Hence it is that the Caledonian 
emblem is dear to those who live above the Tyne, and 
that the Order of the Thistle was invented by James 
III. as an admirable expression of his countrymen's 
characteristics. 



THE BIBLIOPHILE. 



From The Bookzvorm. 



The lover may rave of his ruddy-cheeked lass, 

The sailor may sing of the sea ; 
And topers may tell of the charms of the glass, 

But Books have more beauty for me. 

A book is a treasure more precious than gold ; 

An heirloom bequeathed to mankind ; 
A casket of wisdom in which we behold 

The kingliest gems of the mind. 

Though humble my lot, yet dull care I defy, 

With books for my gentle allies ; 
And folly and vice from my presence will fly, 

When I think of the good and the wise. 

My books will supply me with balm for each blow 

When fortune my best effort spurns ; 
With Swift I will laugh at the high and the low, 

And mourn o'er a " mousie " with Burns. 

While sitting at ease by my own fireside, 

A famous old book on my knee ; 
A lover alone with his beautiful bride, 

Would win little envy from me. 

My heart feels at peace as through Book-world I roam, 

The fair realms of fancy are mine, 
And Love's holy spirit now rests on my home, 

My book is the Volume Divine. 

Alfred C. Brant. 
Leicester, 1879. 



02 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



ravelling Tfun^ \ [land-Bags 

NO WHERE BETTER, 

NO WHERE CHEAPER, 

PETERlUfl'S 

SADDLERY 





AND 



Trank Warehouse, | 

54 & 56 SCHOOLHILL, I 
Aberdeen, 



LARGEST STOCK of 

travelling IRequieites 

in the North of Scotland. 



he Point 



to keep in view is that you get the 
best possible value in Stationery and 
Books from A. Brown and Co., 
j j Union Street, Aberdeen, who 
keep a large and varied stock in 
both departments. 



ROBERT JHENDERSON, 33 and 35 Urxicm Street. 



UMMER FASHIONS 





of JVlillinery, Mantles, Jackets, Gapes, 
Pobes, Dress J^laterials, Ghildrerv's 
Qarmer\ts, ar\d Qeneral Drapervj. 



Extensive Purchases have been made for all Departments of the Warehouse. 



;ii>re5smafcing t ^antlemafcing, ant> $®Ulinen>. 

THE MAKING-UP DEPARTMENTS are under EXPERIENCED MANAGERS, who, having visited London 
jjZ=^ and secured THE NEWEST STYLES, are in a position to show Ladies THE FASHIONS 
®^ FOR SUMMER WEAR. 



ROBWT HENDERSON, 



Drapery Warebouseman, 

33 & 35 XHnion Street 



WE PRINT 



supply ioo Envelopes to 
match, all 



MAKE A NOTE OF THIS. 



Your Address on 120 
Sheets of Smooth Parch- 
ment Note Paper, and 

For 2/2 




k BPOWll \ do, 11 Union jHW, J^bePdeen 




fl. S. COOK, 



SOLE MAKER of the 

Bon-Sccofd 




#* 



HAS 

REMOYED 

FROM 

26 MARKET ST. 

TO 



# 




^Ja;/ specialty 
<^n^ O / 5 percent. Discount 

V ^ / FOR CASH. 

g^g / SUMMER TWEEDS. 

mM"^> // ^^^Sf ^y // • NEWEST SHADES, 

^^fjl^V // ^p * ^ // Beaver, Worsted, and Vicuna 

- t ^ / Special Line in TROUSERS, 16/6 

Five per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



NEWEST 
DESIGNS AND COLOURINGS 



Sammer Overcoatings, 



BLUE 4 BLACK SERGE SUITS, 63/- 



Specialty -— 1/- in the £ Discount 
to Cash Purchasers. 




No. 7. 



JULY. 

Telegrams — "Lorimer, Bootmaker, Aberdeen, 



1892. 



James Itorimer & Son, 

Boot & Shoe Saloons, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 

157 Onion Street, Aberdeen, 

LJAVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, 

including every variety of 

SBoots, |5hoes, and |51i£>f>ers 

For Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 
In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly on hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shooting, Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ©ufcers of Even? Description /Ifeafce to /Ifteasure. 



RIDING BOOTS. 
FIELD BOOTS. 



FISHING BOOTS. 
LIVERY BOOTS. 



SHOOTING BOOTS. 
HIGHLAND BROGUES 



5 PER CENT. DISCOUNT FOR CASH PAYMENTS. 




SURE 



WWs 



%o call 





or\ A. BroWn & Go., Stationers, 77 Union Street, and 
see their samples of Stationery ar\d Envelopes. Or\e Pound of 
Glub Vellum Note paper for Q\d., ar\d One Hundred Envelopes to 

By Special Appointment Patronised by 

Ro yal China Saloo ns 

To The Queen. ^ H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 

John Ford & Co., 

©loss and China (Dei?chanfs, 

136 & 138 Union Street, 

^Ise at 39 prinees jgitreet, and l^elyneed Gflass werks, 
-6X E Bi\\ Bll F^C^ H . XcS. 




No. 7. 



JBrown's Bberfceen Boofe*5talL 



JULY. 



I«Q2. 



No. VII. 



DAVID MELVILL, 
whose shop was at 
"the end of the Broad- 
gate," and who died in 
1643, was the first distinc- 
tive bookseller in the 
city, although a 
" stationarius " 
to sell the books 
required was 
one of the usual 
officials at all 
universities. 
But our David 
had a wider 
public than the 
students, and 
must have been 
an enterprising 
man, for many 
of the earliest 
local publications were printed specially for 
him, and at his expense. At his death, his 
spirit and enterprise seems to have ceased for 
about a hundred years afterwards. 

Edward Raban, our first printer (1622 to 
1650), had his printing shop "above the meill 
mercat," on the north side of the Castlegate. 
If we may judge from the number of books 
printed by him, and considering that he had 




only one man as an assistant, he must have 
been extremely industrious. On Melvill's 
death, his "bueth" or shop was taken by 
Raban, as a convenient place for the sale of 
Almanacs, or " Prognostications," which he 
originated in 1623, and which became so 
famous that 50,000 copies were sold all over 
the Kingdom ; and so popular did they be- 
come, that they were pirated and sold as 
Aberdeen Almanacs by printers in Edinburgh 
and Glasgow, up to 1684, when the pirated 
copies were interdicted by an act of the Privy 
Council. 

On his arrival in Aberdeen, he dropt his 
distinctive sign of the "A.B.C," used by him 
in Edinburgh and also in St. Andrews, for 
the more pretentious one of "The Townes 
Amies," which was long continued by his 
successors; and, "a la Scottice," he took the 
quaint title of the "Laird of Letters," being 
both an author as well as a printer. During 
the next century and a half, his successors as 
town's printers, viz.: James Brown, 1650; 
John Forbes, Sen., 1662; and John Forbes, 
the younger, 1 668-1 704 (the printers of the 
celebrated "Cantus," the first boOk of secular 
music in Scotland) ; his widow, Margaret 
Cuthbord, 1705-10; James Nicol, who 
married her daughter, 1710-36; and James 
Chalmers, 17 36-1 8 10 — all seem to have sold 
the productions of their press direct to chap- 
men, and to the public, without the interven- 
tion of booksellers. They seem to have 
enjoyed a sort of practical monopoly of pro- 
ducing and disposing of books, which was 
broken in upon by Robert Farquhar, 
"quondam Bibliopola," who died 1753, aged 



94 Brown's Book-Stall. 






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Brown's Book- Stall. 



95 



6 1, and is buried ;in St. Nicholas Churchyard, 
and who was succeeded in business by a 
nephew, Robert, some of whose family rose 
to distinction in the navy ; also by Francis 
Douglas about 1748, who, with a William 
Murray, set up a printing and publishing 
house in 1750. 

In such a bookish place as Aberdeen, the 
seat of two universities, there must have been, 
and there were, many individuals who made 
at least part of their living by the sale of 
books ; and on the title-pages of numerous 
books published last century, we find a good 
many names of parties who were not pro- 
fessed booksellers, were " merchants," but yet 
had books specially printed for them, and at 
whose shops they were sold. Nothing is 
known of John Scroggs, Broadgate, 1759; 
George Fowler and Alex. Cheyne, 1764; 
George Johnstone, printer, and John Fother- 
ingham, merchant, 1769; J. Menzye, 1770; 
or W. Coutts, 1775 ; but simply that certain 
volumes were printed for, or sold by them. 
It is likely that they were of the nature 
of cometary bodies or irregular stars, at- 
tracted out of their usual course by religious 
or philanthropic influences, who had thus 
wandered into the constellation of booksellers 
and disappeared again into the region of dark 
oblivion. 

But there was one highly respectable firm 
which began before Francis Douglas, 1748-69; 
or A. Thomson, Broadgate, 1752; or J. Boyle, 
1760-92; or "the cripple votary of Parnassus," 
the " little decrepit body with some abilities," 
as Burns called Andrew Sheriffs (1780) — 
which began even before Mr. Brown was 
born, and continued well into this century, 
leaving very few landmarks in their career, 
and from which much more literary work 
might have been expected, namely, Alex- 
ander Angus & Sons. True, their name 
is conjoined with others, on books issued 
about the end of the century, but there is 
little or no sign of any ventures in publica- 
tion of their own, save "Scougal's Reflections," 
1765. The founder, Alexander (b. 1721, 
d. 1802), a son of the minister of Kinellar, 
began life as a bookseller about 1744, and 
thus was one of the earliest booksellers, as 
apart from printers. He had a numerous 



family, most of whom died young, but his 
sons, John and Andrew, were bred to the 
father's business, and the firm continued to 
exist until the death of John in 1828, when 
the last survivor, Andrew, gave up business, 
and died two years after at his villa of Angus- 
field, near Rubislaw Quarries. This long 
continuance of eighty-six years is extremely 
uneventful. The partners seem to have been 
content to pursue the even tenor of their way, 
undistinguished by enterprise in their business, 
or by entering into public life or civic work of 
any kind. Douglas, and Boyle, and Sheriffs 
also, all bulked largely in our local annals, 
but not so Angus & Sons, so that one is 
thankful for some human notice of their 
personality, like this in a letter of Baillie 
Burnett, to a friend in 1791, where he 
says : — 

"Your friend, Jackie Angus, is now the greatest 
Beau in town ; he has got the showiest shop in town — 
a large new door, and two of the very largest windows 
in the City." 

(Thanks, Baillie, for this slight glimmer in 
the gloom !) The windows would be about 
6 feet by 4J, with twelve panes of glass, and 
the shop was situated in the Narrow Wynd, 
on the site of which the town-house now 
stands. Here the booksellers did mostly 
congregate, and it might have been considered 
a local Paternoster Row, for in addition to 
that of Angus & Sons, it contained the shops 
of Mr. Chalmers, Mrs. Burnett, and Mr. 
Stevenson. 

Angus's shop was long a well known lounge 
of the better-class citizens, where the local 
news was discussed and gossip circulated. 
There were wits, wags, and satirists amongst 
their customers, for, in 1813, there was said 
to have been picked up on the floor of the 
shop a mysteriously dropt manuscript, yclept, 
" The Book of the Times : or the Wicked 
of the City pointed out, and of those whom 
the wicked tormented." This yielded a vast 
fund of amusement to those who were 
privileged to peruse it, and copies were 
taken of it, but it was never published, for 
if it had, it might have produced an abund- 
ant crop of law suits, many of the citizens 
being treated in no lenient spirit. This 
peculiar form of satire — as witness the 



96 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



TRY. 



LiittlejoKrx & Sor\'s 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are miexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. LittlEcJohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 



RUG 



STRAPS are now in 
Season, 6d., i/, & 1/6 



PPS 



for either Cyclists or 
Tourists, or neither. 
Large Variety always 
in stock. 



A. Brown & Co., yy Union Street, Aberdeen, 



John Heaths Pens 




DISPATCH PEN 2/ e 



OFFICIAL PEN FM?/, 



55 GOLD COATED \ 

<o COLONIAL PEN C^)™; 8 

- -tn -.- J H HM.E AT H -^^^? Z M 



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F. M. B., 2/6 



Sample Box (24 kinds) and List, 7 stamps, BIRMINGHAM. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



97 



" Shaver," the " Chameleon," and the pro- 
ductions of James Bruce — if it did not 
originate in, has been very prevalent in Aber- 
deen. And oatmeal being a heat producer, 
and the source of that "wut" and humour 
for which the Scotch are celebrated, this 
degenerate and dangerous form of it may 
have originated in an undue indulgence in 
oatmeal, unqualified by the excellent correct- 
ive of the Shorter Catechism. Let it be 
noticed that this wicked brochure appeared 
four years previous to a similar one, the idea 
of which was thus borrowed from us, in the 
celebrated " Chaldee Manuscript, " which 
appeared in Blackwood's Magazine in 1817, 
and, setting all the Edinburgh citizens by 
the ears, it had to be suppressed. 

Meantime, Mr. Brown was not allowing 
the grass to grow under his feet. If he was 
pushing business, it went ahead as fast as he 
could well follow it. That it was remunerative, 
is evident by his numerous investments : in 
house property (in Castle Street and Broad- 
ford), in a Tontine and other companies, in a 
Manganese Quarry at Persley, which, though 
soon exhausted, yielded a profit of ^450 to 
each of the four partners. Among other 
ventures, was the purchase of shares in the 
London Shipping Company, which paid well. 
And as the communication with London has 
become so changed within living memory, it 
may be worth while briefly to notice how it 
was then conducted. A voyage to London 
was so serious an affair then, that most 
prudent Scotchmen made their wills before 
they set out. Even a voyage to Edinburgh 
was made the subject of a small volume in 
1825, by a cannie and worthy Aberdonian 
with " moral reflections " thereon. And little 
wonder, for, with an excess of honesty un- 
known and incomprehensible at present, the 
handbills announcing the sailing of the Lon- 
don smacks were issued without the slightest 
attempt at gilding the philosophic pill. They 
were enough to deter all but the resolute and 
determined. Instead of representing a vessel 
in full sail, gliding along over a smooth and 
unruffled sea, with her flags flying in a fair 
wind, they had a picture of a smack beating 
up against a head wind, in a stiff gale, with 
the waves breaking over her prow, the spray 



drenching her fore and aft, and formidable 
looking rocks looming right ahead; and this — 
before Mcintosh had invented his water- 
proofs. The sight of it was enough to make 
one sea sick, and to induce those who had to 
make the voyage to call in a lawyer before 
sailing. No doubt, the main dependence of 
the Company for profits was on goods, but 
the many knowing ones in a Scottish and 
maritime city like Aberdeen, knew that the 
smacks were well built, well manned, and 
well found, that the table was unequalled, 
that the whisky was cheap (2jd. per gill), 
that the only dangerous part of the voyage 
was that between the Quay-head at Tarnty 
Kirk and the Girdleness; that once past that, 
if a storm arose, the beggars ashore were 
more to be pitied than they were, that if it 
was impossible to proceed, they could run in 
to any of the coast ports and lie till it blew 
over, living sumptuously every day, and the 
fare being three guineas, the longer the 
voyage was, the better for them. The sea- 
dogs that they were, knowing nothing of the 
mal de mer, they took their summer holidays 
in this way, enjoying congenial society, before 
trips to Norway were invented. In a short 
voyage the Company scored a success, but if 
it lasted three weeks, the consolation which 
the manager gave to the directors was that 
the profits on the whisky consumed, largely 
mitigated, if it did not entirely cover, the loss 
on the provisions. 

And now, having twisted this thrum into 
the thread of the narrative, we notice that on 
the death of Mr. Burnett, who had a circulat- 
ing library, Mr. Brown entered into a partner- 
ship with his widow for working her library, 
and it being conjoined with his, the " United 
Public Library" numbered 52,000 volumes. 
Removed to a shop on the west side of Broad 
Street, it was placed under the charge of 
young Forbes Frost, who then got the privil- 
ege of selling stationery in it, and he cultivated 
this branch of business with profit to himself 
and satisfaction to his customers ; indeed, 
rather more so than was quite agreeable to 
his employer, who began to fear a future 
rival in business. 

However, this preference of him over one 
who had then been about twenty years in 



9 8 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Graigdam and its (Dinisters. 

The Rev. Wm. Brown and the 

Rev. Patrick Robertson. 

By George Walker. 

Seco7id Edition, with Corrections and Additions 

Price 6d. 



"The volume is brimful of fun, and the stories are told with 
a keen perception and genuine appreciation of their worth." — 
Express. 

"The sketches both of Mr. Brown and of Mr. Robertson 
are distinct and lively. They will give an hour's enjoyment 
to whoever reads them." — Perthshire Constitutional. 



"WHAT THINK YE OF CHRIST?" 

A Sermon by the Rev. WILLIAM BROWN, Craigdam, with 
Memoir of the Author and Notices of the Rise of the 
Secession in the North of Scotland. By Rev. PATRICK 
ROBERTSON, Craigdam. 6d. 



THE GOODWIFE AT HOME. 

In Metre, illustrating the Dialect of the North-West District of 
Aberdeenshire. By a Lady. With Glossary. 3d. 



ABERDONIANA. 

Footdee in the Last Century. By the Authoress of "The 
Goodwife at Home." 2d. 



THE ROMANTIC SCOTTISH BALLADS 
AND THE LADY WARDLAW HERESY. 

By NOKVAL CLYNE. 8vo, sewed, is. 



ABERDEEN AND ITS FOLK; from the 
20th to the 50th Year of the Present 
Century. 

By a Son of Bon-Accord. Foolscap 8vo, Cloth, 2s. 6d. 



THE METHODS OF DEBATE. 

By Professor BAIN, LL.D. 6d. 

WORKS OF FICTION: their Use and Abuse. 

By Rev. HENRY ANGUS. 6d. 



PROTOPLASM, POWHEADS, 
PORWIGGLES, AND THE EVOLUTION OF 
THE HORSE FROM THE RHINOCEROS: 

Illustrating Professor Huxley's Scientific Mode of getting up 
the Creation and upsetting Moses. 6d. 



RECORDS OF THE PARISH OF ELLON. 

By THOMAS MAIR, Kermuck, Ellon. 5 s. 



A. Brown <& Co., 



77 UNION STREET 
ABERDEEN. 



(D 



a ke Your (Hill. ^ 

Forms for making a WILL with 
directions, 3d. each, post free 3^d. 



A. BROWN & Co., 

77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



I 



ft CLUB VELLUM 

61 



>!QTEfAPER 
A BROWN &CO 

STATIONERS. 

77. Union Street, ABERDEEN. 



mmmmmmmm 



The 

History 

of 

Loch 
Kinnord. 

BY 

Rev. J. G. Michie. 

Price 1/6, Post Free, 1/9. 




A. BROWN & Co., 

77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



99 



Mr. Brown's service, was deeply felt by David 
Wyllie. In his beautiful current hand, and 
in a model manner, he sent a most respectful 
remonstiance to Mr. Brown, but without 
avail. Hence the origin of a very thinly con- 
cealed hostility between these two assistants, 
which continued as long as they lived, and 
which, as both afterwards rose to honourable 
position, might, in their descendants, have 
developed into rival civic factions — like the 
Guelphs and Ghibellines of Rome, or the 
Montagues and Capulets of Verona, without 
a Romeo and Juliet to dignify and ennoble 
it. Or it might have turned into a clannish 
feud between the "great Frosts of the north" 
and their Wyllie rivals. For although Aber- 
deen had outgrown the village size, it had 
retained many of its village propensities, and 
so, much to the amusement of, and partly 
instigated by, onlookers, the quarrel became 
a pretty little comedy, in which inuendos were 
used as stilettos, sarcastic remarks as daggers, 
and the deadliest weapon was, that in com- 
mon use at the period — a good round oath. 
The pity was that when both the principals 
had gone into the land of deep forgetfulness, 
the small and petty rivalry had not been 
buried with them. 

In 1 812, Mr Brown's business was in full 
swing, requiring a numerous staff of assistants, 
and keeping the printing press busy ; and 
demands being made that he should enter 
the Town Council and give the city the 
benefit of his services, his eldest son, William, 
was entered as an apprentice to the business, 
and regularly indentured. 

As a clansman under his adopted chieftain, 
he had printed large editions of Homer's 
"Iliad" and "Odyssey," and stereotyping 
being then unknown, — having faith in his 
patron classic, he printed thousands of 
copies, and filled his warehouses with huge 
bundles of them in sheets. But the text 
was full of crabbed contractions ; the edition 
was superseded by others, and in the course 
of years was fairly swept out of the field by 
the cheap German editions which flooded the 
country forty years ago. The only consola- 
tion these bales afforded to one of Mr. 
Brown's degenerate successors, was that they 
were valued as waste, and the paper being 



good and genuine, the sheets did well for 
wrapping up purposes, and in some cases 
positively induced a study of Greek, and gal- 
vanized a dead language into temporary life. 

It is a proof of Mr. Brown's enterprise, 
that he was the first Aberdeen bookseller who 
bought copyrights : buying from Mr. Ross, { 
organist of St. Paul's, his Musical Instruction 
Books, Exercises and Songs ; and numerous 
School Books from teachers in the town — 
Mr. Watt, Dr. Melvin, and others. He had 
secured the copyright of Principal Campbell's 
"Lectures," of which two editions were issued, 
and the publication of which led to various 
replies and rejoinders being printed by local 
authors, and thus giving him the healthy 
exercise of a good run on a book, than which, 
to a bookseller, there is nothing more exhil- 
arating. And a still larger venture was the 
issue of Campbell's " Translations of the 
Gospels," in four volumes, 8vo, which had 
a large sale, and came to a second edition. 

Of Principal Campbell's merits it is super- 
fluous to write. If his works are now dead, 
they lived and were widely influential then, 
when he was considered equal to Paley, and 
higher than Dr. Chalmers even long after. 
As the ever deepening clouds of oblivion 
gather over the departed, some luminous 
points shine through the gloom, and will help 
to keep him in the ranks of our eminent men : 
such as — he was a first rate specimen of a 
moderate minister ; as such, and as the suc- 
cessor of the evangelical John Bissett, he was, 
by his moderatism, the involuntary originator 
of the Seceders and the Voluntaries in Aber- 
deen ; by his controversy on miracles with 
Hume, he elevated controversy into a fair and 
candid discussion for truth, and not a mere 
wrangle and combat for victory in "debate; 
he had the courage of his convictions, and 
could stand firmly in opposition to all his 
associates, for when they were all rabid 
against the proposal to repeal the persecuting 
statutes against the Roman Catholics, he was 
for the repeal of the acts and for toleration, 
even although the mob smashed his windows 
for this, just as they smashed the windows 
of Mr. Bissett some forty years previously, be- 
cause he was against a Popish Government. 

Principal Campbell was married to Grace 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



p 



HOTOGRflPHS Of KeS. 

-*** Local Scenery. 



SCRAPS, OPALS, MEDALLIONS. 



Views in Tartan Frames. 



Albums of Views 



Aberdeen and Deeside, 
i/- Each. 



A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 




From Photo by] 



In the Duthie Park, Aberdeen. 



[G. W. Wilson & Co., Aberdeen. 



GUIDE BOOKS. *d 

Aberdeen, 
Deeside, ~ 
Bennachie, 
Ben Muich Dhui, 



1/ 



Six Etchings of 
Local Scenery, 

- - One Shilling. • - 

Or in Cloth Gilt 1/6. 



A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



IOI 



Farquharson, of the Whitehouse family, 
who, if somewhat hasty, was a good wife to 
him. She was an active superintendent of 
household affairs, " cumbered with much 
serving," and on one occasion preparing for 
a social party in their house, 49 Schoolhill, 
she collided with her husband, who was little 
of stature and meek in temper. She broke 
out with "Oot the wye, ye bodie, ye're aye i' 
the road in a steer." "Well, Grade," said he, 
" if I were out of the way, maybe there would 
na be sae muckle steer." This reminds us of 
the worthy Bishop William Skinner, who was 
of like meek temper, while Mrs. Skinner was 
not equally so, nor like-wise. Entering the 
" Book-Stall " one day, the couple came into 
collision with each other, and Mrs. Skinner 
exclaimed — " Deil speed ye, Bishop ! ye've 
trampit on my taes ! " " I'm very sorry, my 
dear," said he, " but surely ye might have 
wished me a better wish, even though I did." 

OLD FRIENDS. 



Those who need Accident Insurance. 



It's an owercome sooth for age an' youth, 

And it brooks \vi' nae denial, 
That the dearest friends are the auldest friends, 

And the young are just on trial. 

There's a rival bauld wi' young and auld, 

And it's him that has bereft me ; 
For the surest friends are the auldest friends, 

And the maist o' mines hae left me. 

There are kind hearts still for friends to fill, 

And fools to take and break them ; 
But the nearest friends are the auldest friends, 

And the grave's the place to seek them. 

Robert Louis Stevenson. 



Visiting Cards. 



50 for 1/6, 100 for 2/6, - 
Addresses 6d. extra. 



A. BROWN & Co. 

77 Union Street. 



Who are they? Well, according to our observation, 
everybody needs it if that need is to be gauged by the 
possibility of accidents, and we know of no other rule 
to go by. It is the unexpected which always happens, 
and there is no occupation in life which has not its 
liabilities to this. One of our American humourists 
not long since wrote an article on this subject, showing 
that more persons are killed and injured by accident 
while engaged in their daily avocations than among 
those who travel by rail and steamboat. It was a 
humorous presentation of the matter, and yet it con- 
tained a large element of truth. So long as human 
beings exist upon the earth so long will there be 
danger to life and limb by accidents, and no man, 
whatever his business or surroundings, can truthfully 
say that he is not exposed to such danger. One may 
use every precaution possible to guard against accidents, 
and yet can have no certainty that he will escape. 
Hence the need of accident insurance, and hence the 
additional fact that such need is universal and common 
to all. It is, of course, greater in some cases than in 
others because of occupation or surroundings, but it 
exists nevertheless. To recognise this fact is to act 
upon its plain teachings, if one is wise, and provide 
against it. A man may pay for accident insurance a 
good part of his life, and never meet with an accident, 
but the money so invested is not money thrown away. 
The peace of mind which an accident insurance policy 
engenders is worth something — in fact, it is worth a 
great deal. The writer of this has carried accident 
insurance for years, and has never had occasion to call 
on the companies for one dollar, but he does not 
consider the money paid out for premiums as wasted 
by any means. Value received has existed all along 
in the knowledge that the contingencies arising from 
accidental injuries has been provided for, and this 
knowledge has been worth the cost. This is a strong 
argument in favour of accident insurance, and one of 
the reasons why the reader should insure with the 

SCOTTISH 

Employers' Liability & flecident 

ASSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED. 

(Head Office, 9 King Street, Aberdeen). 



PERSONAL ACCIDENT DEPARTMENT.-Greater 

Benefits than other First-class Companies given for the 

same premium. (See prospectus). 
EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY.— Employers fully indem- 

nified. Workmen insured. 
FIDELITY GUARANTEE.— Bonds issued to Employers 

requiring Security. 
THIRD PARTY INDEMNITY.— The only Office granting 

complete Indemnity to Owners of Vehicles. Policies free 

from unnecessary conditions. 

J AS. DAVIDSON, Manager. 



102 



Brown's Book-Stall. 







Cabinet /Ifoafcers anb Xflpbolsterers, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shorn Rooms at 



257 I)|110|i STREET, 



and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and ^Upholstery Goods. 



tlbe Cabtliet jfUmitUre made in their own Workshop will 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



Zhciv mew Carpet Saloon is stocked wM | I the , 

best makes of 

British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums, 
Mattings, Rugs, &c. y 

Curtains and Upholstery Materials. 



IbOlbUtn Cabttiet MOrfeS are now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



103 



IRefc ftape in IRussia. 

A correspondent writes : "A few days ago a firm of 
stationers in St. Petersburg was officially notified by 
post that a packet addressed to them was lying at the 
custom-house. This official notice was then signed 
by the head of the firm, giving the porter the right to 
receive the packet. The notice was then taken by 
the house-steward (dvornik) to the police, who certified 
that the signature on the paper was that of the head 
of the firm ; this cost about fourpence. The next day 
the porter proceeded to the custom-house and, after a 
delay of several hours and the payment of sixpence, 
he obtained the packet, which contained twelve pens 
sent by Messrs. Heath as samples ! The pens were 
valued at one penny. The above is not an isolated 
case, such things happen frequently." We hope this 
will not deter any one from writing to A. Brown & 
Co., 77 Union Street, for a sample of Heath's pens. 



" Xaugb a Xittle Bit/' 

Here's a motto, just your fit : 
" Laugh a little bit." 

When you think you're trouble-hit, 
"Laugh a little bit." 

Look Misfortune in the face, 

Brave the beldam's rude grimace ; 

Ten to one 'twill yield its place 

If you have the grit and wit 

Just to laugh a little bit. 

Keep your face with sunshine lit ; — 
"Laugh a little bit." 

Gloomy shadows off will flit 

If you have the wit and grit 

Just to laugh a little bit. 

Cherish this as sacred writ : 
"Laugh a little bit." 

Keep it with you, sample it ; — 
"Laugh a little bit." 

Little ills will sure betide you, 

Fortune may not sit beside you, 

Men may mock and Fame deride you, 

But you'll mind them not a whit 

If you laugh a little bit. 

J. Edmund V. Cooke, in St. Nicholas. 



In addition to the "Blunders in the Bible" we 
printed last month, there may be added another that 
was in a Bible printed in 1700, where a passage 
in Psalm cxix. 161, is rendered — "Printers have 
persecuted me without a cause." Princes were the 
persecutors. 



THE SECRET OF "LORNA DOONE'S : 
POPULARITY. 



What is the secret of the popularity and tenacity of 
that tiresome tale called "Lorna Doone," the favourite 
story of nine out of every ten women ? 

Not the lagging tale itself, for it could be told in a 
chapter. 

It is the presumably perfect picture of a day we can 
never look upon, a recitative of manners and customs 
which induce an uncountenanced thrill of self-con- 
gratulation as we close the book and contemplate the 
picturesque furnishing of another brain-cell ; the 
human mind "wants to know." 

Tourists make it a point to travel through the Lorna 
Doone country and see the "local colour" for 
themselves. 

Editions de luxe of the book have been published 
with elaborate pictures of the localities where the 
scenes, tame and stirring, were enacted. 

Had the story been rapidly told without the aid of 
scenery and detail, or flung indiscriminately upon some 
trite old spot, Blackmore would have been obliged to 
take more pains with his later works. — Lippincott's 
Magazine. 



THE RIGHT OF VOTING. 



Want of property is no proof of wanting industry, 
talents or virtue. Then why should a deficiency of 
fortune annihilate a man's political consequence? 
If an individual be without property and not supported 
by public or private benefactions, he must, unless a 
robber, be considered industrious. 

But a man of property has no such assurance in his 
favour. A poor man so circumstanced has therefore 
a much better right to vote than a rich man, on the 
mere account of contributing to the State. — Ensor. 



Rubber Stamps -i^- 

- - FOR - - 

-** Marking Linen, 

With Pad and Ink complete for 

1/6. 



A. BROWN & Co., 

77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



io4 Brown's Book- Stall. 



$ummer • Games. 






Lawn Tennis. — Children's Rackets from 1/9. Full-sized Rackets from 5/6. 
Nets, Balls, Bags, Markers, Presses, &c., &c. 

CPOCJliet. — Again very popular; 12/6 to 50/. 

Lawn Bowls, Aunt Sally, Hurlingham, Cricket, &e. 



Children's Cars. — Reliable Make, 12/6 to 47/6. 

Folding* Chairs, Camp Stools, Hammocks, Japanese 

Lawn Umbrellas. 
Travelling* Bags, Dressing Cases, and other Holiday Requisites. 



Collie 5 Taylor 



Bon-7\eeopcl Bazaar, 
TeleP No ne 579 . 12 3 Union Street. 




GOTT GHflHWERS. 

General and parnishing Ironmonger, 
88 UNION STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 



Lamps of every Description 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



*°5 




Snap Shots, 



Photographer — "Raise the chin a little please?'^ 

Victim — "Am I all right otherwise?" 

"Yes." 

"Just want the chin a littte higher?" 

"Yes; that's all." 

"Anything to accommodate you." 
(Takes out his false teeth, closes his mouth, and his 
chin comes up to his nose). 



A certaine lady, whose husband was a great scholler, 
and very studious, on a time came into her husband's 
studie, and said : "Fie, sweetheart, will you never 
have done with your bookes ; if you love them so well, 
would I were a booke too. " Quoth another that sat 
by: " If ever wives should come to be bookes, I 
would have them almanacks, so that every yeare I 
might have a new one. " 

Now, as a century ago, the authors who most relish 
having their own works read are generally those who 
most dislike to hear the productions of others. Dr. 
Johnson once squabbled with a literary friend on this 
point, and observed, " I never did the man an injury; 
but he would read his tragedy to me ! " 



Bad Writing.— Mr. Henry Irving's spider-like 
hand-writing is not of the most legible description. A 
friend had asked him for seats for his family to see 
" Henry VIII.," and the manager had scrawled on a 
half-sheet of note-paper the words, "Lyceum Theatre; 
private box," etc., etc. In the afternoon the gentle- 
man had occasion to have a prescription for influenza 
made up, and by some mistake the wrong document 
was handed to the chemist. All the same, a bottle of 
medicine duly came back. Anybody who has seen 
Irving's writing will believe this story. 

So illegible was the hand-writing of the late 
Horace Greely, that a tradesman whom he had written 
repremanding for some scamped work, used the 
document for years as a free pass upon a railway of 
which Greely was a director. 

It is evident from this that neither Henry Irving nor 
Horace Greely used Brown's Bon-Accord Pen. Had 
they done so, such bad writing would have been 
impossible. 



When Mr. Henry Labouchere was snowed up in a 
railway train last year there was not a single pack of 
cards among his fellow-travellers and he thereupon 
registered a vow never again to travel under any 
circumstances without a pack of cards. Now, consider- 
ing the sort of summer weather we are getting, no 
railway traveller need be surprised if at any moment 
he is snowed up. Therefore no one should travel 
without a pack of Brown's noted i/- pack of playing 
cards. 

"The concise Dictionary stands first — and by a long 
interval — among all the one volume English Diction- 
aries," The Academy. Cash price 3/9, at 77 Union 
Street. 

Mr. Andrew Carnegie in his speech at the opening 
of the Free Library dwelt at considerable length on the 
advantages of free libraries, but said nothing about 
another and much more important class of libraries — 
we mean home libraries. We quite agree with Mr. 
Carnegie as to the importance and usefulness of free 
libraries as a means of spreading knowledge, but we 
hold that a library — even a very small one —at home 
is likely to be of as much, if not of more, use. As a 
bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, so a book 
at home is worth a dozen in the free library, because 
there are many odd moments which might be utilised 
with pleasure and profit if one had a few books at 
hand, but which are lost owing to the time and trouble 
involved in getting a book from the library. More- 
over one can never depend upon getting a book to suit 
them in the library. The book wanted is always 
"out." If the home library is well selected it will 
consist of books which may be read and dipped into 
again and again with pleasure ; and the wants of 
almost any mood may be satisfied from the range of 
about fifty volumes. We do not give here a list of 
the fifty we should choose, we leave Sir John Lubbock 
et hoc genus to do that. But we may say that of the 
best hundred books selected by Sir John, one half 
might with advantage be left out. To any one who 
has difficulty in making a selection we will be happy 
to supply a Cottage Bookshelf and fifty volumes for 
five guineas, which will form a more complete library 
than many more pretentious. Such for example as 
that of a friend of ours, who talked a good deal about 
his library — a library which was discovered to consist 
chiefly of a set of Miss Braddon's novels ! 



A new and cheap edition of Froude's latest book 
"The Story of the Spanish Armada, and other 
Essays," will be issued immediately. 



io6 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Private Gentlemen & Business Firms 

Who look to excellence and style in their 

WRITING PAPER, 

J^K >^_ 3 Should adopt this beautiful paper. 

\ f It is made with 

IMPERIAL GLAZED OR PLAIN SURFACE, 




PARCHMENT 



mot: 



And is an agreeable and high-class paper 
at an ECONOMICAL PRICE. 



To be had from all (§TV© 

ABERDEEN BOOKSELLERS I STATIONERS. 



S)on t fail to 
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use BROWN S 

Bonaccord Pen 



PER BOX 



PER GROSS 



Aberdeen 



r 



easonable Prices and Good Work 



W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers. 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberoeen. 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries." 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



107 



Chambers's Encyclopaedia, volume IX., which is 
just out, carries the dictionary down to Swansea. 
The number of articles of first-rate importance con- 
tained in it is remarkable, among which may be 
named the "Shakespeare and Shelley," of Professor 
Dowden ; the "Waller Scott," of Mr. A. Lang; the 
"Spenser," of Professor Hales; the "Sainte Beuve," 
of Mr. P. H. Brown; the "Schiller," of Mr. Bealby; 
and Mr. Greenwood's memoir of the present Premier. 
Subjects treated on a large scale include "Shipbuild- 
ing," "Sculpture," "Spiritualism," Socialism," 
"Sound," and the various articles coming under the 
head of "Scotland." 



On the eve of an Irish election. English visitor — 
"Well Patsy, who do you think will win to-morrow?" 
Patsy — "Begorra, sir, the survivor !" 



Andrew Carnegie was given the freedom of Aber- 
deen yesterday, and opened a public library to which 
he had given 5,000 of the dollars wrung by him from 
the Workmen at Homestead, Pa. Eleven workmen 
and some others were given the freedom of the 
celestial city at about the same hour. — St. Louis 
Chronicle. 



A good volume of short stories for railway reading 
is "The Gully of Bluemansdyke," by A. Conan 
Doyle. It is readable, handy, and cheap. (Cash 9d.) 

It was in 1827, and at a Theatrical Fund dinner in 
Edinburgh, that Sir Walter Scott declared himself to 
be the author of the " Waverley Novels." This is 
the speech he made on that occasion : — " I did not 
expect, on coming here to-day, that I should have to 
disclose a secret. Now that it is out, however, I beg 
leave to observe that I am sole and undivided author 
of these novels. I confess I am guilty, and am almost 
afraid to examine the extent of my delinquency. 
' Look on't again, I dare not.' The wand of Prospero 
is now broken and my book is buried." 

($oob IRules for Book Buyers. 

"No man can do comfortably without three copies 
of a work. One he must have for a show-copy \ and 
he will probably keep it at his country house. 
Another he will require for his own use and reference ; 
and unless he is inclined to part with this, which is 
very inconvenient, or risk the injury of his best copy, 
he must needs have a third at the service of his 
friends !" — Richard Heber. (Sensible man !) 



JOHN M. SPALDING, 

Qrocer and Wine iYlerchant, 

106 Union Street, 
X BE ft© E Eft'. 



vnm?- 



^ 



Special Old Highland Whiskies at 30/-, 36/-, and 42/- per doz. 



Fine Blends of China, India, and Ceylon Teas, at 1/6, 1/10, 2/4, 

and 2/10 per lb. 
Agent for J. G. Ford & Son, London. 

Pure Altar Wines from the English Colleges at Lisbon and 



St. Alban, Valladolid. 



io8 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



JAMES STEPHEN I SONS, 

CAl^VE^S, tflLDEI^S, 
(Ritsvov and Picture Fpame (Ranuftactuvevs, 

Fine Art Publishers, Artists' Golormen, k, 

48, 49, & 50 WOOLMANHILL, 
eXFX ABERDEEN K^> 

(Opposite Entrance Gate to Royal Infirmary.) 



WORKS: RODGER'S WALK, JOHN STREET. 

Telephone No. 553. 



Mirror Frames Pe-gilt ; Old Frames Pe-gilt ; Evtervj Description of 

Qilding Work done. 



if 

you 

Want 



K Good Book 



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To read on your holidays or in the train, 
or in fact anywhere, go to A. Brown & Co., 
yy Union Street, who have all the best new 
books, both light and heavy, fact or fiction, 



1 



%o guit You. 



The Wrecker, by R. L. Stevenson, 4/6 

Barrack-Room Ballads, by Rudyard Kipling, 4/6 

The White Company, by A. Conan Doyle, 4/6 
Under the Greenwood Tree, by Thomas 

Hardy, 1/6 

The Bishop's Bible, by Walter Besant, ... 1/6 

The Bell of St. Paul's, by Walter Besant,... 1/6 



Gerard, by Miss Braddon, 1/6 

A Bachelor in Search of a Wife, by 

Annie S. Swan, ... ... ... ... 9d. 

My Shipmate Louise, by W. Clark Russell, 1/6 
The Gully of Bluemansdyke, by A. 

Conan Doyle, ... ... ... ... 9d. 

THESE PRICES FOR CASH ONLY. 



Hor 




imner T> tmfles, 



Visit 







ROBOT HEttDWSOtTS 

General ^©raper^ ^XTarebouse, 

33 & 35 UfllOfl STREET, ABERDEEN 



MARRIAGE OUTFITS. FOREIGN OUTFITS. MOURNING OUTFITS. 



J^or Ladles and Children's Underclothing , enter by "Door Ao. 35. 

<af>{ ^OBE^T HENDERSON, x^ 



ote Paper,© 




ew Hint. 



>/% supply 5 (Quires of the new. 



JBiscuit ^Dinted Mote lPafrer 



with your address printed, and 
100 Envelopes to match for 



2/6 




A SAMPLE ACCOMPANIES THIS NUMBER. 



A. BK0WJJ & Go., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



I S. COOK 



SOLE MAKER 

Boik& 



HAS 



Discount 



CASH 




REMOYED 



FROM 



SammeF Overcoatings, 

NEWEST SHADES, 

Beaver, Worsted, and Vicuna. 



Special Line in TROUSERS, 16/6 

a Pair. Five per Cent. Discount for Cash. 



BLACK SERGE SUITS, 63/ 



Specialty— 1/- in the £ Discount 
to Cash Purchasers. 




No. 8. 



AUGUST. 



1892. 



Telegrams — "Lorimer, Bootmaker, Aberdeen." 

James Iiorimer & Son, 

Boot & Shoe Saloons, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 

157 Union Street, Aberdeen, 

111 AVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, 

including every variety of 

Soots, J3hoes<, and J31ij3£>ers 

For Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 
In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly on hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shooting, Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ©rfcers of Every Description /Ifcaoe to /IDeasure. 



RIDING BOOTS. 
FIELD BOOTS. 



FISHING BOOTS. 
LIVERY BOOTS. 



SHOOTING BOOTS, 
HIGHLAND BROGUES 



5 PER CENT. DISCOUNT FOR CASH PAYMENTS. 



By Special Appointment 




t 

Royal China Saloons 



Patronised by 




To The Queen. 



H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 



John Ford & Co., 

©lass and China (I)ei?chanfs, 

136 & 138 Union Street, 
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^Ise at 39 prinees jgtreet, and ^jelyreed Qlass Werks, 



See 

Sample ^^* 


Mr. E. T. Smith. 



77 Union Street. 



VISITING CARDS, 

50 for j/6. 100 for 2/6. 

Addresses, 6d. extra. 
Card Plates Engraved. Dies Cut. Die Stamping done. 



A. BROWN & CO., ri UNION STREET, 

BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS. ~° ABERDEEN. 




No. 8. 



AUGUST. 



IOQ2. 



Brown's Bberfceen JBoo^StalL 



No. VIII. 




"The finding of your Ableman, and getting him 
invested with the symbols of ability, with dignity, 
worship, {wo rt/i -ship), royalty, kinghood, or whatever 
we call it, is the business, well or ill accomplished 
of all social procedure whatsoever in this world." 

O says Carlyie, — and amongst 
other symbols was the provost- 
ship of a city — the mode in 
which the community therein 
marked their choice of an able- 
man, and honoured him. In this "northern 
city cold," before the year 1469, the choice 
was made by the whole citizens, in a head- 
court, and was freely expressed. After that 
period, some difficulty in getting represent- 
atives having been experienced, it was re- 
enacted by the Scots Parliament in 1474, that 
the old Town Council should elect the new 
one, and that the old and new should elect 
the magistrates ; and the old primitive and 
democratic method of popular election thus 
came to a close. In course of time, by 
inherent corruption, and the force of circum- 
stances, the new rule became the fruitful 
scource of manifold abuses, and by the ever- 
increasing complaints of the citizens, of want 
of representation, of want of control, and of 
want of power to call their rulers to account 
in any way, it became evident that locally 
the business was ill accomplished. In 
Aberdeen at the close of last century, it 



was intensified by the patent fact that the 
representation on the Police Board, in which 
the election was by ballot, worked smoothly, 
and gave entire satisfaction to the citizens. 

How this power of self-election had operated 
in former days may be seen in the fact, that 
during the sixteenth century, four members of 
the family of Menzies, ruled over the city for 
the long period of eighty-three years, and that 
almost continuously ; and but for the Reform 
Bill of 1832, it seemed probable that a 
similar state of matters would again have 
occurred ; for in the early years of this 
century, entrance into the Town Council was 
either the easiest, or the most difficult thing 
possible — all depended on the entrants hav- 
ing friends already within it. Brains and 
ability in outsiders were sometimes desirable 
— under proper control — but otherwise they 
simply served as temporary stop-gaps. The 
poor man, who, by his wisdom, might be able 
to save a city, had very little chance indeed 
of doing so if he was not connected with or 
dependent on the ruling family for the time. 

In the Burgh Reform Report, presented to 
the House of Commons in 18 19, it is stated 
that— 

"The old council elect their successors, by which 
means, it is not only possible, but it almost invariably 
happens, that by alternate elections of each other, the 
same party maintains possession of the council, to the 
entire exclusion of the rest of the burgesses. And 
although by the sett, fifteen out of nineteen members 
composing the council must retire annually, it appears 
by the return of members of council for the last 
twenty years, and by the evidence of the town clerk, 
that during said period Provost Hadden has been 
fifteen times in council ; his partner Provost Brebner 
ten times ; his brother Mr. Gavin Hadden ten times, 



Brown's Book-Stall. 















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p^ 




To Consumers of KeXs 

ey(?X 0FF1GE & DRAW1NQ PENCILS. 

/■ TSE only Pencils of ENGLISH MANUFACTURE. 

They are Superior in every respect to those of Foreign make. 



Bank of Enolano 

Pure Cumberland Lead 

Spanish Graphite 
{£ou0heneo Xeab 

For Draughtsmen 



fyeneik 



ARE SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED. 
They are made by Ski lled Workmen . KeX^ 

s — — — ■ — 

eXsX Extra Valae and Qnality Gqafanteed. 

<E[. Wolff & &on y 

Wlanufachfe^ to pei* Majesty government \ the Ban^ of England, 
£TEAM PENCIL CHOCKS, 

Battersea, London, s.w. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



etc., and that the majority of the council have been 
the same individuals during that time, and chiefly 
either relations or connections in business of Provost 
Hadden, who has been considered as the leader of 
the town council for the last twenty years — and this 
whether he was in or out of council at the time. " 

This paragraph conveys only a faint idea 
of the predominating influence which Provost 
Hadden exercised, and continued to exercise, 
for full forty years, from his entrance to the 
council in 1792, until the passing of the 
Reform Bill in 1832. 

Besides those mentioned, here is a list of 
some other relations and connections in office 
from 1799 to 1 819, with the number of years 
in which they served, and kept their seats 
warm for family successors : — his son Alex- 
ander, four years ; his son, James, three ; his 
partner, Provost Leys, ten ; his cousin, Mr. 
Johnstone, ten ; his relatives, Provost Jas. 
Young, nine ; John Young, ten ; Provost 
More, nine ; and Alexander More, six. The 
future services of these last two being lost for 
half the time by its having been proved 
before the Court of Session that along with 
John Rae, merchant, they two had combined 
to keep down the biddings at the roup of the 
shore dues in 18 10. And this united family 
party had devoted adherents and supporters, 
in the persons of Provost Fraser, for eleven 
years out of the twenty ; Baillies Galen, 
eleven ; Garden, ten ; Lumsden, nine ; Mc- 
Combie, nine; and we must add our then 
Baillie Brown, seven years. 

It is one of the difficulties of our time that 
we cannot transport ourselves into the old 
times and look upon the old government and 
the proposed changes as the old folks then 
did. John Ewen and the other Aberdeen 
Reformers were fifty years ahead of their day. 
As the law stood in 1785, and down to this 
time, 1 8 19, the self-elected magistrates were 
not only entitled to spend the public money 
in any way they thought proper, without being 
obliged to account for it, but they were also 
entitled to contract debts, for which the 
Burgesses were personally liable. A Bill to 
remedy this was proposed in 1787, but never 
became an Act — it was considered as revolu- 
tionary, as the sheep controlling the shepherd. 
In 1 815, Wine and Entertainments cost 
.£382 tts nd, and from 1799 to 1818 



these along with Travelling, cost ^"6123 16s. 
Three-bottle men were common in those 
"jolly old days." 

Up to 1 810, things seemed to have gone 
smoothly enough in their council manage- 
ment. The expense of the opening up of 
the new streets, which had purposely been 
kept in a separate account, had very far 
exceeded the estimates, and no statement of 
the expenditure had ever been submitted to 
the council or the public, but to a select 
committee, while there was an annual defici- 
ency in payment of interest, of upwards of 
^"5000, and which was ever threatening to 
increase. This cloud on the horizon was a 
scource of trouble to, amongst others, the 
shrewd Baillie Galen, who as an accountant 
was familiar with figures and money trans- 
actions. 

In 181 1, the stern pressure of financial 
reasons, — that ever accompanying Nemesis 
which dogs the steps of rash unthoughtful- 
ness, — broke in upon the family party with all 
the disagreeableness of a thunder-clap at a 
pic-nic. And then, but only then, it was felt 
advisable to open the door of the council 
chamber a little wider, in order to admit 
some new blood other than connections; and 
thus try to divide the growing and dangerous 
responsibility connected with the continual 
and increasing demand for, and outlay of 
money, and those "accommodation bills" 
which vulture-like, actually began to make 
their appearance in the financing of a Town 
Council about this time. 

Amongst the outsiders, there was one 
young fellow who, although only twenty-three 
years of age, had already made his mark in 
the city by his acknowledged uncommon 
smartness and ability. He was well con- 
nected — the son of a wealthy wine merchant 
— of a good old family — one of whose 
ancestors had as Provost, uplifted the banner 
of the city, and held it up in 17 15 for the 
Pretender. And notwithstanding the change 
of dynasty, this banner having still inscribed 
on it the words "Toryism," "Family Ascend- 
ancy," and "Use and Wont," curiously 
was yet upheld in Aberdeen. And so, for vari- 
ous reasons, his youth not being considered 
objectionable, (for was not Pitt made 



II2 Brown's Book-Stall. 




VEflYBODY 



in want of good Stationery 
should call and see the 
bargains we offer in 
Note Paper and Envelopes. 



3/3 

2/6 

2/6 

2/2 

An o /~* 7 7 Union Street, 

. D TOWIl 0£ V^O., &^b®^ Aberdeen. 



5 Quires Imperial Parchment with your 
Address printed, and ioo Envelopes 
to match, for 

5 Quires of the New Biscuit Tinted Note 
Paper with your Address printed, and 
ioo Envelopes to match, for 

5 Quires Granite Note Paper with your 
Address printed, and ioo Envelopes 
to match, for 

5 Quires Smooth Parchment Note Paper 
with your Address printed, and ioo 
Envelopes to match, for 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



113 



Prime Minister at the age of twenty-four?) 
and his antecedents being proper, Sandy 
Bannerman — the future Sir Alexander — was 
chosen as a councillor in 181 1. But the 
teachings of a century, containing in it two 
rebellions, a French Revolution with an 
unheard of and entirely new flag, which 
influenced so many young men in this coun- 
try, had not been without effect on him. He 
had brains of his own, he could think for 
himself, and was not content to run quietly 
in harness which galled him. He was guilty 
of insubordination, of kicking over the traces, 
of speaking outside in Angus's shop of 
Council proceedings, of criticising his com- 
peers, and actually of speaking for, and 
voting — if not leading the minority — and 
thus after one year's service he, Jonah-like was 
thrown overboard and not re-elected. It was 
the most unwise step the party in power 
could possibly have adopted, if they wished 
to retain their ascendency. His free speech, 
his courage, and talents in debate had marked 
him as the popular leader of the Whig 
opposition to the Tory Council. Had they 
retained him — poacher on their preserves 
though they considered him to be — yet 
perchance there was the possibility of turning 
him by blandishment and cajolery, into a 
first-rate gamekeeper. But they had had 
enough of him, and he was discarded. For 
twenty years after he kept them in boiling 
water as to their harbour management, which 
he got transferred to a new board. In 18 19 
he stewed them in a Committee of the House 
of Commons, regarding the concealing of 
debts, the over-assessments of taxes, the 
fabrication of minutes, and issuing accom- 
modation bills, and gave the officials such a 
sweat as they had never before experienced 
in this world. And the war between him and 
the council being a Poutrance, aided by 
Joseph Hume, and the young democracy, he 
so roasted the office-holders, that when the 
Reform Bill passed, the magnates of the city 
sunk into obscurity, and he became the idol 
of the period, and the popular first M.P. for 
the city. Such are the revenges which Time 
in its whirligigs brings about ; and the moral it 
teaches is — let Youth venerate Age, and let Age 
respect Youth. Not only was the honour of 



Knighthood conferred on him in 185 1, but 
what is a thousand times more interesting to 
readers of the "Book-Stall," he has been 
immortalized by Thomas Carlyle as "Herr 
Towgood," — the winner in marriage of the 
fair Maigaret Gordon, the "Blumine" in 
"Sartor Resartus." Little did some of the 
urchins, who managed to get one of the 
white and blue ribbon rosettes, she freely 
scattered from her window in Marischal 
Street on the day of her husband's nomina- 
tion, — think or know that they had seen 
Carlyle's first Divinity, and like the knights 
in the tournaments of old, had worn her 
favours in the jousts. Fair in looks, hand- 
some in person, and accomplished in manner, 
she did credit to Carlyle's good taste ; and 
her last letter to him, so evidently appreciative 
of his genius, and yet so full of simple strong 
common sense, shows a highly cultured and 
reflective mind. A foster-child, she certainly 
deserved to be a fostered wife. 



Pressed to accept the vacant chair, Mr. 
Brown entered the council in 181 2, and the 
election being in September, the reader will 
notice that each year's service comprised 
three months of one, and nine months of the 
succeeding years mentioned. It is a proof of 
the estimation in which Mr. Brown was held, 
that he was at once elected fourth Baillie, 
and served two years. In 18 14, his own 
business required all his attention, but in 
18 1 5, he was re-appointed to the same 
office, and in 18 16, was made second Baillie, 
and was thus in office when the city was 
declared bankrupt in February, 181 7. In 
1 8 18, as Dean of Guild, he continued to give 
his valuable help in the then critical state of 
the financial affairs. In 18 19, he declined 
office, but his son William, as Master of 
Mortifications, kept him well posted up in 
the state of affairs, and then, as afterwards, 
when he was in the council, was largely 
guided by him regarding the measures 
proposed. Mr. Brown was first Baillie in 
1820, and '21, and as such, along with Provost 
Gavin Hadden and the other magistrates, 
went to Edinburgh and represented in great 
state, with handsome equipages, and well 



14 



Brown's Book-Stall. 







Cabinet /Ifcafcers ano XDlpbolsterers, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shorn tyooms at 



257 UfilOfl STREET, 



and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and WLpholstcry Goods, 



Qhe Cabinet jf UmttUre made in their own Workshop will 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



is stocked with the 

best makes of 



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British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums, 
Mattings, Rugs, &c, 

Curtains and Upholstery Materials. 



IbOlbUVn Cabinet MOrkS are now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



115 



dressed attendants in their official liveries, the 
dignity of the city. In bag-wigs, court 
dresses, and swords, the magistrates attended 
the Levee of King George IV., on the 17th 
of August, 1822, being introduced at Holy- 
rood by Lord Aberdeen — the Aberdeen 
Address being severely criticised, and not 
without reason, in the local papers. 

The next two years, 1822 and '23 he filled 
the Civic Chair, and was largely instrumental 
in procuring the satisfactory arrangement with 
the city creditors. In 1824, he was a simple 
councillor, in 1825, was second Baillie, and in 
1826 and '27, filled again the civic chair. As 



simple act of justice to the city clergy, as 
to their number, their status, and their 
emoluments. Aberdeen had for a long time 
been ecclesiastically one parish, but it was 
divided into two preaching churches, and as 
the population increased, each of these had 
been made collegiate charges, and to supple- 
ment their incomes the incumbents held 
plural offices either in the University, or in 
Greyfriars Church, which had bequests of its 
own, — so also had Footdee, to supply it with 
a separate catechist or preacher. In 1795, 
the city clergy raised an action for an increase 
of their stipends from ^120, to something 




Provost, he laid the foundation stone of the 
new bridge of Don, (May 23rd 1827). He 
then congratulated those present that the fine 
bridge would not cost the citizens anything, 
and ended by giving — as usual — the con- 
tractor, Mr. Gibbof Willowbank, "something" 
as a pour boire for the workmen. Retiring 
from the Provostship in 1827, he was elected 
a councillor in 1828, and then, he — the son 
of a Seceder minister, who in his rural charge 
was "passing rich with forty pounds a year," 
but was supplemented by the free gifts of his 
flock, enabling him to bring up a family, and 
still leave a good estate — was mainly instru- 
mental in originating, and carrying out, a 



more reasonable and decent. But they failed, 
for their action was raised, not before the 
hearts and consciences of the members of the 
Christian church, where they would have 
succeeded, but before the cold, hard, dry, 
matter-of-fact Law Courts — where Christian 
principle, or New Testament precepts being 
unrecorded — it was held that as there were 
no unexhausted teinds to fall back upon, the 
pursuers had no case. Their stipends were 
afterwards raised voluntarily to ^200 each. 

In 1 819, Joseph Hume and Sandy Banner- 
man, assisted by the most eminent counsel, 
had directed their eagle glances, and their 
microscopic researches into the transactions 



n6 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



117 



of the Council during by-gone years, and 
these although defensible and defended, 
looked somewhat suspicious. These old Use 
and Wont transactions, magnified in import- 
ance, and made the worst of by the Reformers 
of the period, having been brought into the 
light of day, the prudent men of the council 
thought it high time that this question of the 
action of their predecessors should be min- 
utely examined, and finally settled ; all the 
more so as an ominous small cloud, called 
Reform, was looming larger and ever larger 
on the horizon. After lengthened consultation 
with all parties, and specially with the Rev. 
Dr. Thomson of Footdee, one of the shrewd- 
est and most worldly-wise men of his day, 
who was deeply concerned, and who specially 
safeguarded his own interests in the settle- 
ment, an agreement, sanctioned and ap- 
proved of by all the city clergy, and by both 
the presbytery and synod, was come to ; and 
certainly it was so generous that but for its 
containing a settlement of all past disputes, 
it would never have been looked at, or 
agreed to ; even as it was, it was considered 
by many as extravagantly and lavishly gener- 
ous. Aberdeen, instead as hitherto of forming 
one parish with two preaching churches, was 
now to be divided into six — the East, West, 
North, South, Greyfriars, and St. Clements, 
each with a church and clergyman ; and the 
new churches cost the city about ^"30,000. 
And instead of only having to pay in stipends 
^"800 per annum as previously, the sum now 
agreed upon in future was to be no less than 
^1650 a year. The negotiations, begun 
while Provost Brown was chief, were long 
and protracted, and all parties being "ripely 
and well advised," it was with peculiar satis- 
faction that by a decreet of the Court of 
Teinds of 5th March, 1828, Provost Brown 
got this matter, according to the best legal 
knowledge of the time, fairly and finally 
settled ; and thereupon he received the warm- 
est congratulations from all the interested 
parties on his success in inducing the council 
to be so generous. 

He continued to serve in 1829 and '30, 
and again in 1832, the last year of the old 
regime, these last year's services being more 
nominal than real, arising from ill health and 



the necessary amputation of his leg. But 
even then, there is abundant evidence, that 
even when absent from Aberdeen he was 
largely consulted on city affairs by the Provost 
and the officials. During the twenty-one 
years from 181 2 to 1832, he was in office for 
seventeen of these years, and more than any 
one else, his name was conjoined with that of 
Provost James Hadden as a ruler in the city, 
and an opposer of the Reform Bill. 

The period embraced within these years 
was a stormy and troublous time for the 
magistrates and councillors, and still more so 
for the paid officials. The system of book- 
keeping in all the departments had, like the 
old exchequer tally system, been of the 
simplest and easiest which was possible, and 
only one member of council, Baillie Galen, 
was said to be capable of understanding it. 
No full accounts were ever exhibited — only 
abstracts of the skeleton order with dry bones 
and no flesh. Even the minutes of meetings 
were not read, and only years afterwards did 
some members find out that by them they 
were represented as sanctioning transactions 
at meetings at which they were not even 
present. 

And while in 1809 these abstracts re- 
presented the debts of the city as under 
^7000, it was well known to some, and must 
have been suspected by many, that it was nearer 
;£i 70,000, and not till 181 7 was the full debt 
of ^250,000 shown. This arose from the 
accounts of the Improvements being kept in 
a separate scroll. Had this measure been as 
speedily profitable as was expected, the profits 
would have gone to swell the funds of the 
"Common Good," and not to reduce the 
rates, but as it threatened to turn out unprofit- 
able (at least, for the time) the transactions 
were only recorded in the books some seven- 
teen years after, in such a way as to endeavour 
to fix the liability on the whole of the citizens. 

In 18 18, Joseph Hume, the radical re- 
former and economist, very much against the 
wishes of the council, became their parlia- 
mentary representative, and through him, and 
by means of a select Committee of the 
House of Commons, an exhaustive expose of 
Aberdeen management was made known, and 
locally published in 18 19. The Augean 



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ii 9 



stable got a very thorough cleansing out at 
this time, so much so, that when by the 
Reform Bill an entirely new set of men were 
installed in office, and great revelation of 
abuses were eagerly expected to be made, it 
was found after minute and careful examina- 
tion, that public matters had been managed 
with strict honour and integrity, and that 
complaints of wrong done, or injury suffered, 
even in the long past, had all been redressed 
and satisfactorily settled for all time to come. 

The old patriarchal government by a family 
compact was found wanting. As admitted 
even by the council themselves (19th Sep- 
tember, 18 1 7), it tended "to foster a system 
of secrecy and concealment under which the 
most upright and best intentioned magistrate 
may not be able to acquire that thorough 
knowledge" which was requisite. Provost 
James Hadden was so conscious of the 
purity of his motives and action, that he 
came forward as a candidate for the represent- 
ation of the city, in opposition to Mr. 
Bannerman j and even in the new and altered 
state, actually ventured to seek re-election 
afterwards as a simple councillor for the 
third ward, neither of which he would certainly 
have done had he had anything to conceal ; 
and on his retirement into private life he 
rose gradually higher and higher in public 
estimation during the last fourteen years of 
his life, until his death in 1845. 

But the whole government of the country 
was of the Augean-stable order, and required 
a Hercules to cleanse it. The Reform Bill 
was the greatest innovation on the govern- 
ment of the country since the Revolution, 
and dealt very trenchantly indeed with private 
property. Proprietors of pocket boroughs 
worth from four to five thousand pounds 
each, certainly had very strong reasons to 
oppose the wholesale confiscation of their 
property which it sanctioned and enforced ; 
and yet after it was in operation as Lord 
Cockburn says — 

"In spite of all the defects of the plan, what a 
boon it is to Scotland ... I doubt if there be 
any period of our past history, at which it was more 
worth while to have lived than during the first an- 
nouncement of the late revival of the Constitution, 
the deep anxiety attending its progress, the almost 
universal joy at its triumph, the excitement of its being 



first carried into practice, and the gradual familiarizing 
of the people to the quiet exercise of their new got 
rights." 

Fifty years ago in the days of the hustings, 
an election by open voting was by no means 
a "quiet exercise of rights." Public opinion 
was in so violent ebullition that much public 
and private work had to be stopt. Men's 
minds were filled with hatred and clamour, 
which in many places broke out in stormy 
rioting, in which the windows of the opposite 
party's houses were smashed, and the persons 
of unpopular candidates were bespattered 
with rotten cabbages or addled eggs, and 
pelted with dead cats. ( Vide Pickwick, which 
is not all fiction). Compare this with the 
steady, mechanical, clock-like operation of 
the election of 1892, in which the result, — 
but for the blunders of enumerators, — comes 
out with all the certainty of the striking of 
the hour; the listening world then quietly 
moving on as before. 



©uc ^Trumpet, 



" If on occasion one bloweth not one's own horn, the 
same withal shall not be blown.'''' 



Extract from a letter from a son of Bon-Accord 
who was for many years a printer in Aberdeen — 

"And then as to the Book-Stalls. I read them all — 
every word. They were all very interesting to me. 
I remember Brownie the snuffy ' ' ruler " mannie . . . 
If these papers were ever extended and reprinted in 
proper form, as they could very well be, I, like a son 
of the " Silver City by the Sea," shall go in for a copy, 
for I take great delight in thinking of the men of the 
generation in Aberdeen, who foresaw its development 
by building Union Street — for that splendid thorough- 
fare, as we all know, is literally paved with gold, and 
by a people, too, who had more faith in the future 
than present coin in their exchequer. As a typo- 
graphic effort, The Book-Stall is a positive picture — 
the eye rests on every page with pleasure. I con- 
gratulate the printer, and the other designers and 
executors of the work, on its beauty and excellence. 
The Book-Stall is a capital idea : it is a worthy union 
of business go and literary gracefulness, and must 
therefore be acceptable to every citizen of Bon- Accord." 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



ABERDEEN BOOKS. 

A. BROWN & Co., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Local Humbugs, or Studies in Social Ethics, 

by the Baron of Leys. 8vo, i/. 1884. 
Leach's The Quadrangle by Moonlight, 1/6. 

1879. 
McConnochie's Lochnagar. 8vo, cl., 2/. 
Nichol's Geology of the North of Scotland, 1/. 

1866. 
Selections from the Writings of William 

Forsyth. With Portrait, 3/. 1882. 

Martin's Ballads and Poems. i2mo, 6d. 1879. 
Paul's Past and Present of Aberdeenshire, 2/6. 

1881. 
Wilson's Historical Account and Delineation 

of Aberdeen. Fine Plates, 6/. 1822. 
Anderson's Black Book of Kincardineshire. 

i2mo, 4/6. 1843. 

Cadenhead's Territorial History of the Burgh 

of Aberdeen. 8vo, 1/. 1878. 

The Family of Cadenhead, 5/. 1887. 

Shirref's Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. 

Wants Portrait. 8vo, 3/6. l 19°- 

Walker's Robert Gordon, 1 665-1 731 ; His 

Hospital, 1750-1876; and his College, 

1880. 8vo, 4/6. 1886. 

Mary Queen of Scots : A Narrative and 

Defence. Portrait and 8 Illustrations. 
8vo, 10/6. 1889. 

Alexander's Johnny Gibb of Gushetneuk. 
Edition de Luxe. Illustrated by George 
Reid, P.R.S.A. Fine copy, 52/6. 

Davidson's Inverurie and the Earldom of the 
Garioch. W T ith appendix. 4T.0 cloth, 
16/. 1878. 

Gregor's Echo of the Olden Time from the 
North of Scotland. F'cap 8vo, cloth, 
2/. 1874. 

Bruce's Eminent Men of Aberdeen. i2mo, 
6/. 1841. 



Aberdeen and its Folk, from the 20th to the 
50th year of the present century. By a 
Son of Bon-Accord. F'cap 8vo, cloth, 
2/6. 1868. 

Pratt's Buchan. Illust. 121110, cloth, 13/6. 

Wilson's Repository of Bon-Accord Insti- 
tutions, 1/. 1842. 

Orem's Description of the Chanonry, Cathe- 
dral and King's College of Old Aberdeen. 
1724-5. 8vo, 10/6. 1830. 

Hutchieson's Village Voices or Warbles from 
the Sprays of Stoneywood. Cloth, 1/6. 

1878. 

Duncan's The Traveller. i2mo, 1/6. 1854. 

Monday's From the Tone of Somersetshire 
to the Don of Aberdeenshire. 121110, 
cloth, 4/. 1886. 

Bulloch's The Lord Rectors of the Universi- 
ties of Aberdeen. i2mo, sewed, 2/. 

1890. 

Rettie's Aberdeen Fifty Years Ago. 2 1 Plates. 
8vo, 4/. 1868. 

Aitken's Star Dust. 8vo, 1/. 1883. 

MacLachlan's Metrical Effusions. i2mo, 2/. 

1816. 

Douglas' Description of the East Coast of 
Scotland. 8vo, half Morocco, 7/6. 1826. 

Beattie's Fruit of Time Parings. 8vo, 2/. 1873. 

Couper's Tourifications of Malachi Meldrum. 
2 vols., i2mo, 4/. 1803. 

Hall's War of Life. i2mo, 1/6. 1866. 

Macgillivray's Molluscous Animals of Scot- 
land. i2mo, 2/. 1844. 

Robertson's Scottish Abbeys and Cathedrals. 
Large paper copy, 8vo, 7/6. 1891. 

Smith's Memoir of Dr. John Milne, Founder 
of the Milne Bequest. Portrait. 8vo, 
cloth, 1/. 1891. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



12 




^Ttyi — -jy^-^iyis — sK>??<V 



The Pall Mall Budget says — "We learn on no mean 
authority that the purchaser of the Althorp Library is 
Mr. J. Arnold Green, of 56 Paternoster Row, the son 
of the Secretary of the Religious Tract Society. Mr. 
Green has for son.e time been collecting old books on 
his own account to the extent of some ,£20,000. Mr. 
Green, we understand, has made these purchases and 
has now acquired the Althorp Library with money 
provided by Mrs. J. Rylands, the well known 
Manchester millionaire. The destination of Mrs. 
Rylands' magnificent gift will in all probability be 
Manchester. It appears therefore that "the man who 
has bought the Althorp Library " is really a woman. 



It is to be hoped, says a lady correspondent, that 
an "innovation" started by an authoress last week will 
not become universal. According to one of the ladies' 
papers the guests were invited to hear "the writer 
read passages from her forthcoming book ; after which 
she was surrounded and congratulated by those 
present." It is often bad enough to have to read our 
friends' novels, once they are published ; but the 
bonds of friendship will be severely strained if we 
should have to listen to (and admire) passages in MS. 
form at afternoon teas. 



In an interesting chapter in his new book on 
Carlyle, on the personal characteristics of his hero, 
Professor Nichol gives us the result of a careful 
analysis of the motive which inspired the too abundant 
Carlylean satire. He assailed, we are told, three sets 
of people : "1. Real humbugs, or those who had 
behaved, or whom he believed to have behaved, badly 
to him.* 2. Persons from whom he differed, or whom 
he could not understand, as Shelley, Keats, Lamb, 
Coleridge, and the leaders of physics and metaphysics. 
3. Persons who had befriended him, but would not 
give him an unrestricted homage or an implicit follow- 
ing." The classification is most instructive. With 
this amount of latitude in the selection of objects of 
his animosity and vilification, a man might, to use one 
of Carlyle's favourite expressions, "go far." One is 
almost reminded of the "comprehensive and compend- 
ious" anathema elicited, according to a familiar 



anecdote, from the impatient parson by the clerk's too 
frequent enunciation of the hymn commencing, "All 
people that on earth do dwell." — H. D. Traill. 

[* For instance, did not Carlyle speak very contempt- 
uously of Macaulay as being of very little account in 
literature, when he was under the impression Macaulay 
had done him an ill turn ? And did not Carlyle only 
discover there was something in Macaulay after all, 
when he discovered that the great historian had done 
the opposite of what he was suspected of doing? 
Some folk think that Carlyle's judgment seat was 
mainly situated in his stomach, and that his verdicts, 
personal and literary, depended in a great degree upon 
how he assimilated his latest diet.] 

Preparations have been made for the establishment 
of fifty popular libraries in Rome as a memorial of the 
Pope's Jubilee. 



Is it generally known that Mr. William Blackwood 
christened "The Mill on the Floss"? "Sister Maggie" 
was George Eliot's own title. "The Mill on the 
Floss" is the better name, although the Tullivers' 
mill was, in fact, not actually upon the Floss but on 
the tributary Ripple, as is stated in the very first para- 
graph of the book. Every worldly-wise novelist 
should consult his publisher about his title. 



No worker in the world, says Mr. Walter Besant — 
not even the needlewoman — is more helpless, more 
ignorant, more cruelly sweated than the author. 



The art of fiction is the art of leaving out. To put 
in everything is the secret longing of every novelist ; 
but three influences, in their varying measures, debar 
him from the fulfilment of his dream — the local con- 
ventions of propriety, the natural indolence of man, 
and the fatal necessity of making his work somewhat 
less lengthy than the life of his reader. Something 
he must omit, and the question what to omit is the 
question which divides literary schools and national 
literatures. 



What is this world? An infinitesimal ball of stone 
and mud rolling about through space we know not 
whence, or where, of no greater size in comparison 
with the millions on millions of other worlds than an 
ant-hill on its surface — a mere, almost indistinguish- 
able, spot in infinity, with a quantity of insignificant 
creatures on it, who flutter about for a few minutes, 
and then are resolved into the elements. Is it not, 
then, too absurd that these creatures should be ever 
seeking to lord it over each other, and that any human 



122 



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If uncertain — buy an assorted box, and choose a pen to suit your hand. 
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*3 



being should care for what he calls "fame " ? I never 
look at an ant's nest without these thoughts occurring 
to me. — Truth. 



Carlyle quotes a saying of Richter, that Luther's 
words were like blows ; he himself compares those of 
Burns to cannon-balls ; much of his own writing is a 
fusilade. All three were vehement in abuse of things 
and persons they did not like ; abuse that might seem 
reckless, if not sometimes coarse, were it not redeemed, 
as the rogueries of FalstafT are, by strains of humour. 
The most Protean quality of Carlyle's genius is his 
humour : now lighting up the crevices of some quaint 
fancy, now shining over his serious thought like sun- 
shine over the sea, it is at its best as finely quaint as 
that of Cervantes, more humane than Swift's. — Prof. 
Nichol. 



As those precious stones are more to be esteemed, 
which not onely doe delight the eyes with a variety of 
colours, and the more with a sweet scent, but are also 
effectuall for medicine ; so those bookes are most to 
be regarded, which have not only the exornations of 
speech, but alsoe doe free the minde from vices by 
wholesome precepts. — Wit's Academy. 



The world will end neither by water nor by fire. 
It will be buried under successive falls of literary 
matter, and the last inhabitant will die of boredom 
before his complete immersion has taken place. — The 
Princesse Karadja. 



Miss Elder (literary). "Do you like "Crabbe's 
Tales," Mr. Hojack? 

Hojack (of epicurean tastes, but somewhat puzzled) 
"I can't say I do, but I am very fond of the meat in 
lobsters' claws." 



"Did you ever hear me preach ? " once said the sage 
of Highgate to wise and witty Elia. "Why, in fact," 
replied Lamb, "I never heard you do anything else 
but preach," meaning thereby that he was much given 
to long and wearisome discourse, from which it was 
hard to escape. Long before Elia's time, the word 
"sermon" had come to mean, as it still often does, 
the name applied to any piece of downright prosiness ; 
long, dull talk of any kind ; the absence of what is 
agreeable, invigorating, and inviting. This may 
possibly in some measure account for the singular 
fact that the Pope, who claims to be the high-priest 
of Christendom, is the one priest in that extensive 
diocese who never enters a pulpit. — Nineteenth 
Century. 



Books are masters who correct our ignorance with- 
out putting it to shame. They instruct us without rods 
or ferules ; without harsh words or anger ; without 
money, and without fatigue. When you approach 
them, they are never weary ; when you interrogate 
them, they conceal nothing. If you mistake them, 
they do not grumble ; if you are stupid, they do not 
laugh at you. They are the most patient and gentle 
of our teachers, and the most to be cherished. 



He attained the proud title of Mr., 
And she pledged to be more than a er, 

So they stood at the altar, 

And ne'er did he falter, 
When he bent o'er and solemnly kr. 



H TLoast. 




mS TJ ERE ' S 
f/W r~1 who g 

^ A J- page ; 



a health to all the girls 
grace our modern fiction's 



To Tessy of the D'Urbervilles, to 
Betsy sweet and sage, 
To Peggy of the House-boat, and the wild 

Egyptian Sprite 
Who turned the head of him who fed the 
taste for Ancient Light. 

To Rose who played the violin while Els- 
mere's doubts were fixed ; 
"l^JIfcf To poor Fenella, outraged wife, whose 
"fate " was rather mixed ; 
To Mamie and to Maisie, and the "red-haired girl" 

who paled 
With the torture of her longing for the Light that 
somehow Failed. 

To Mrs. Hauksbee, dangerous as flaming kerosene, 

Or the chemical indifference of nitro-glycerine ; 

To Mrs. Threep'ny Bit, who must be rather passee 

now, 
And the lady in the "Document" who loved— no 

matter how. 

To naughty Cynthia, wayward Kate, and Helen lithe 
and tall, 

And many another queenly fair — a health to each and 
all; 

From Meredith's originals and Besant's household pet, 

To the bread-and-butter maiden of the Penny Novel- 
ette. 

— St. James's Gazette. 



I2 4 



Brown's Book-Stall. 




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SEPTEMBER. 



892. 



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JSrowtVs Hberfceen JBoofe=5talL 



No. IX. 




AKING an example from 
Thackeray, who, in his serial 
issue of "Vanity Fair," apo- 
logised for the humdrum 
character of one of the num- 
bers, but for the readers 
comfort and expectancy in- 
timated that "there were 
some terrific chapters com- 
ing," — we gladly break the 
thread of our narrative — (if 
there is one?) — to present 
one of these "terrific" chapters; which 
character may be confidently given to it, 
because it is not original, but entirely ex- 
tracted. And yet in a snow-storm, as the fast 
falling snow-flakes hide all things and soon 
obliterate each other, so in the literary world, 
because "of the making of books there is no 
end," a good book, and still more a good 
article, is so soon overwhelmed and buried by 
others that to ninety-nine Aberdonian read- 
ers out of a hundred, it may be confidently 
affirmed that this chapter regarding their own 
city and its citizens will be entirely new. On 
its appearance sixty-two years ago in the pages 
of the "New Monthly Magazine" it attracted 
much notice here, and little wonder. For a 
time it was the talk of the town, and the 
delight even of little boys of the period; and 



now the present writer could only procure a 
sight of it from another city, in which it 
seemed to be so much more appreciated than 
here, as to ensure its careful preservation. 
With the consent of the Editor of the "Book- 
Stall," it is now inserted in it, where it is his 
proud boast that it will be largely read and 
lovingly preserved amongst the other remin- 
iscences of the olden days. It bears all the 
marks of having been written by Pryse Lock- 
hart Gordon, an Aberdeenshire man whose 
brother, Abercrombie L. Gordon, long filled the 
position of minister of Greyfriars Church, 
and was much and deservedly respected. 
Pryse was in the army, and as companion to 
a nobleman, Lord Montgomery, travelled 
much, kept his eyes and ears open, and his 
pen going. While resident in Aberdeen, he 
published in London, " Personal Memoirs of 
Men and Manners at Home and Abroad, 
1780 to 1830," 8vo, 2 vols., and was the 
writer of other volumes and magazine articles : 
He was also a constant visitor at the " Book- 
Stall" where his conversation had all the raci- 
ness of the sermons delivered by Dr. Chalmers, 
as characterised by an old female attender 
who patronized his church, because, as she 
said, "in the pulpit he was baith edifyin' an' 
divertin'." 

Under the title of "The Land of Cakes" he 
describes his country and its people, not spar- 
ing the lash where he thinks it necessary. 
He says those in the north are prone to lower 
others, in order to make themselves seem 
superior, and this largely accounts for the 
strong prejudice against Aberdonians [which 
no longer exists]. They are industrious and 



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127 



independent, well to do in general ; kindly to 
each other in casualties ; happy and hospit- 
able ; religious in the joyous way, and the 
landed proprietors are largely resident, and are 
like the people. Under the heading of 

"Aberdeen Awa," 

he illustrates the dialect by taking the 
following as his motto — 

"And how did you contrive to communicate the 
pronunciation when you taught the English language 
at Newcastle?" 

"I lait it a' doon ba rool, ye see, an' re-ed it ba 
exampal." 

"In the case of o o?" 

"I taul them for a constant rool that twa o's soon'it 
ay the voual u ; for instance, g, o, o, d, gweed" 

Aberdeen, he says, is more metropolitan, 
and has been longer so than any other city in 
Scotland. The modern Athens is but a 
thing of yesterday to it. Dumfries, a kind of 
south-west metropolis is weakened by gossip- 
ing, and full of old maids. Kelso is soaked 
in small beer. Glasgow wants taste. Inver- 
ness wants everything but pride. Aberdeen 
has everything within itself, and teaches, cures, 
and kills its people without any outward assist- 
ance. It is not advisable to believe all that is 
said about the antiquity of the city "as that 
Abaris the Scythian [500 B.C.] left its Gram- 
mar School to attend the lectures of Pytha- 
goras ; that Mrs. Tacitus drank tea with the 
Provost's wife; that her husband lecturing in the 
Town-hall first taught the citizens that shrewd 
philosophy for which they have ever since 
been remarkable; that his work "De moribus 
Germanorum," is really an account of Aber- 
deenshire ; or that his father-in-law, Agricola, 
got a touch of the "fiddle" by incautiously 
sleeping in sheets that had been once used by 

the Town Clerk Thus in 

Aberdeen we have the work of ages all 
concentrated and deposited on the banks of 

its two rivers The place is not 

without literati, and itself is the standard 
subject. Within the last twenty years there 
have been three distinct histories of the city, 
and one of these [Kennedy's Annals, 2 vols., 
4to, A. Brown & Co.,] is both physically and 
metaphysically a very ponderous tome — a fair 
load for a body of ordinary strength, and 
more than enough for most minds. 



"The author of this book is one of the 
Dons of the city ; and if not the very bright- 
est of wits in himself, has yet been made a 
little conspicuous by those spirits of whom 
there is a pretty regular succession in Aber- 
deen, and who carry their practical waggeries 
farther than would be either safe or seemly in 
most other places. I have mentioned, how- 
ever, that the delight of the whole district is 
fun ; and if the people can but get it, they 
care not much at whose expense. 

"The personage in question is a very respect- 
able member, I believe the Dean of the 
Faculty of Advocates, that is, of Attorneys 
practising before all the courts of the place ; 
but he has some peculiarities. In matters of 
profane learning, he is a Binitarian [sic] : and 
the two idols of his adoration are black-letter, 
and his own understanding, and the cause is 
probably the same as to both. The wags 
used to be aware of this amiable weakness, 
and play him tricks. 

"Once when the assize was at Aberdeen, 
Jeffrey, the late editor of the Edinburgh 
Review, attended professionally. He, and 
some of the Aberdonian wags, when taking 
their wine after the labours of the day, got a 
piece of old parchment, which they greased 
and smoked, to make it look still older; 
while it was hot they scrawled it over with a 
burnt stick, in marks as little like any known 
characters as could be, and having dried and 
folded it, and rubbed the folds upon the hearth 
till it was worn through in some places, they 
gave it another smoking and wrapping it up 
with the greatest care sent it to the black-letter 
man, with a long eulogium on his powers, an 
intimation that it had foiled all the antiquaries 
in the south, and that he alone could prevent 
the precious relic from being lost to the world. 
As this came with the compliments of the 
editor of the "Edinburgh Review," an answer 
was immediately sent back, full of gratitude 
for the honour, and of assurance that that 
very night the labour of decyphering it should 
be begun. To work he set, and spent the 
whole night without being able to decypher 
one word ; so he wrote in the morning, 
returning the relic, and adding, that, though 
the interpretation was beyond his powers, it 
was invaluable — certainly of a date anterior 



128 



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129 



to any of the Egyptian hieroglyphics. The 
messenger carried it back to him, with a polite 
note, stating, that as he knew more about it 
than any one else, no one could be so worthy 
of the possession — it was therefore his, to 
have and to hold in all time coming. Never 
was man so delighted ; the donor, the gift, 
the circumstances under which he possessed 
it, — all were rather too much for mortal man. 
The house could not contain him, and he 
sallied out proclaiming his great fame and 
fortune. But though the propagation was 
speedy, and the congratulations warm, the 
period of both was brief, for his tormentors 
were on the watch, and followed him so 
closely, that before he had carried the tidings 
to the last friend all the others were in 
possession of the real case. 

"It is on these practical jokes, which it must 
be admitted have a little wickedness mingled 
with their waggery, that the chief peculiarity 
of the Aberdonians consists. They are played 
off upon parties who are nearly on a level 
with the wags in rank, but they are keenly 
relished by the whole community. There is 
one other, which was practised on the same 
gentleman by the same characters, which it 
may not be improper to mention. 

"The shore immediately to the south of 
Aberdeen, is wild and precipitous, advantage- 
ous for fishing, and the high rocks thronged 
with sea-fowl, though the land is barren in the 
extreme. Shooting these fowl is an amuse- 
ment with the Aberdonians, who, upon these 
occasions usually have a fish dinner at the 
village of Skaterow, a place almost destitute 
of vegetation. Two of the wags, after a suit- 
able eulogium on the sporting powers of the 
historian, prevailed on him to accompany 
them there. One rode a fine spirited horse, 
and the other went into a post-chaise with the 
historian, whose vanity he worked about the 
shooting, and also the figure that he would 
make on the horse, which the owner kept 
caracoling before the post-chaise. They 
reached the place, and with some difficulty 
got, at low water, to a spot where they said 
the sport would be most successful. To the 
historian it was remarkably so ; for though he 
was so near sighted that he could hardly have 
seen an elephant at the top of the rock, every 



time that he fired, the birds fell around him 
like thunder, and splashed him with their 
fall ; so that for one that the others got, he 
had at least fifty. The fact was that they had 
employed two men for a week, and had at 
least a cart load of dead birds on the top of 
the rock, of which a man threw down an 
armful every time that the historian fired. 
He was delighted, and kept firing away, 
hardly perceiving that the point on which he 
stood was completely surrounded, and begin- 
ning to be covered by the tide, and his 
associates were shouting from the beach that 
the horn had blown twice, and the dinner 
would be spoiled ; at the same time a big 
stone had been put into the boat, which had 
filled and was under water. The historian 
now shouted for deliverance, and a stout 
fisherman and boy were instantly in the 
water. The latter took the fowling-piece and 
was soon on terra firma, but the other had to 
hoist the sportsman on his shoulder. When 
they came to the deepest place, the fisherman 
roared that his leg had been bitten by a shark, 
plunged his charge into the water, completely 
to the bottom, and as that charge thought 
into the very maw of the sea monster. He 
roared, but there was instant relief, and all 
dripping as he was he was borne to the inn by 
the fishermen. Arriving there, the dinner 
was on the table, and the historian must take 
the chair; but change of clothes was necessary, 
and male attire was not to be had. No 
matter ; they were all friends ; and the chair- 
man took his place equipped in a red flannel 
petticoat, linsey-wolsey bed-gown and mob- 
cap ; the last had become necessary from the 
loss of his hat and wig in the sea, and the 
care of his friends that his head should not 
suffer. 

"The Aberdonians say that one may 'gyang 
far'er an' fare waur' than by getting a dinner 
at Skaterow, and I can certify the fact. An 
Ichthyophagus can nowhere fare better, either 
as to fish, or something to make it swim; and 
as there was abundance of the sauce that he 
liked best, the historian was now in his glory, 
nathless the oddity of his costume. But 
surgit amari aliquid — who can control the 
fates ? A messenger well known to the chair- 
man burst into the room ;— 'For Heaven's 



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131 



sake gentleman, the next house is on fire, the 
engines are out of order, and the Dean's 
library will be in flames !' and with that he 
mounted his smoking steed and vanished in 
the direction of the city. There was not a 
moment to be lost — 'My kingdom for a 
horse!' He was on the back of one in an 
instant — the post-chaise was at his heels ; and 
'helter skelter' to save the library. The 
historian was no horseman, though from the 
morning's lecture he fancied that he was. 
The stirrups had been shortened — his feet 
were pushed into them up to the ankles — his 
body was recumbent, and his hands delved 
alternately under the saddle and into the 
mane. His heels kicked out, the red flannel 
petticoat fluttered, the steed pranced, the 
post-boy smacked his whip, the two wags sat 
holding their sides, the country people shouted 

'Gweed !' and the town, as the cavalcade 

scoured along, was crowded with people who 
received it with peals of laughter. When the 
historian reached his domicile, he found that 
the alarm had been raised, and not the fire ; 
and the demonstrations of anger and threats 
of vengeance by his two associates knew no 
bounds. 

"Notwithstanding the number and the un- 
easiness of these disasters, and the fact that 
they had fallen exclusively upon the historian, 
the wags had the wit not only to get them- 
selves exculpated from all concern in the 
alarm of fire, the only part of the matter 
that was not wholly accidental ; and they did 
not leave him till they had worked him up to 
the necessity of challenging to mortal combat 
an individual upon whom they laid the blame. 
That he might be successful in that, one of 
his friends undertook to give him lessons in 
pistol shooting, and that no time might be 
lost, the practice was commenced on the very 
next morning. But that practice changed 
the relative position of the parties, the pupil 
became so certain a shot that at the usual 
duello distance he could hit a wafer for any 
number of times running ; and so the wags 
were constrained to desist, lest he should turn 
against them in earnest, that power which they 
had communicated to him in sport." 

%* The remainder of this article zvill be given in 
the next number. 



But while on the subject of duelling, which, 
though of modern origin, dating only from 
the fourteenth century, was defended by our 
moralist, Dr. Johnson, who forcibly argued, 
that if public war by soldiers who had no 
cause of personal quarrel, was consistent with 
morality and the Christian religion, then 
private war was equally so ; yet it was begin- 
ning to be strongly objected to by the enlight- 
ened conscience of modern days, and duelling 
has now been altogether put down, at least in 
Britain. Still at this transition period, Sandy 
Bannerman and his waggish friends paltered 
with it, and made it the means of their 
enjoyment of not a little fun, to the goddess 
of which they were devotees. 

He and his comrades had got hold of a 
ninny — a devoted admirer of an Aberdeen 
belle who had quite a host of admirers and 
suitors for her hand. At one of their con- 
vival meetings, he and another rival had 
quarrelled over their respective positions in 
the good graces of the lady. And eked on 
by his companions, a challenge was given him 
by his rival, which he had no help but to 
accept. And so, very early one morning, he 
found himself standing in the Old Town 
Links with his antagonist facing him — both 
with pistols in hand. These pistols had been 
loaded with extreme care — the antagonists 
were placed in due position, and a doctor 
was present. The signal was given, the 
pistols were discharged — deponent will not 
swear as to the bullets, but to the horror of the 
green innocent whose Christian name must 
have been "Verdant," he saw his adversary 
throw up his arms wildly, falling to the 
ground, and uttering a loud groan, while the 
blood was streaming from his breast. 

Ah reader ! in circumstances like these 
what avails it to you that Codes of Honour 
sanction your proceedings ? Good oatmeal 
may have roused the old Adam within you, 
but the stern Calvinistic precepts of the 
Shorter Catechism running through every 
vein of your body proclaims you a murderer ! 

Horror-struck, and with unutterable anguish, 
his whole past life flashing through his brain, 
and the gallows, or at least banishment, loom- 
ing before him, our hero almost fainted. 
But his seconds were equal to the occasion, 



132 



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and had been as carefully drilled as though 
they had belonged to the modern Ambulance 
Corps. They, after he had received the dying 
forgiveness of his rival, instantly hurried him 
away. By their advice he took the very first 
coach to the south, and in due time, (which 
means a good deal longer time than at pre- 
sent), he found himself snug and securely 
hid in Montrose, which in those days was 
farther away from Aberdeen than London is 
at present. Here he lay for some days perdu 
to friends and acquaintances, until the period 
during which the conspirators wished his 
absence had elapsed, when to his glad and 
joyful relief, word was sent him that his 
antagonist had made a most marvellous re- 
covery, that he was actually stepping about 
again, and was soon to be married to a certain 
lady, who, in admiration of his bravery, and 
in sincere sympathy for his sufferings on her 
behalf, had accepted the offer of his devoted 
heart, and his brave hand. 

It transpired afterwards, that the successful 
suitor had fastened a pudding filled with 
blood round his waist, and at the proper time 
had ripped it up, with the desired result, and 
with undoubted success. 

That the most "Christian nation " in Europe 
should still practise duelling is a satire on 
civilization which shows it is only skin deep. 
Unsuccessfully attempted to be repressed in 
England in 17 13, it is to the immortal hon- 
our of a foreigner, Prince Albert, that in his 
adopted country, where there was an Estab- 
lished Church, with its Bishops sitting in the 
highest court of law, he, untrammelled by the 
rigid code of honour in his own country, 
should have redeemed us from a savage and 
barbarous custom in 1844. 

But it was hard to kill. Within living 
memory much excitement arose in Presbyter- 
ian Aberdeen in consequence of two separate 
challenges to mortal combat being given by 
citizens. The first was that given by Mr. 
Lumsden, an advocate, about 1828 ? to a Mr. 
Russell, said to be of the Aden family. Mr. 
Russell properly declined it, and was posted 
in the Athenaeum news-room, and it ended in 
an action in the law courts. The next, some- 
where in the thirties of this century, was the 
challenge given by James Adam, the portly 



editor of the "Aberdeen Herald," to worthy 
and equally portly David Chalmers, the 
editor of the "Journal," and the news of the 
challenge fell like a bomb-shell on the ears of 
the citizens. Baillie Chalmers was a respected 
elder of the West Kirk, and one of the most 
peaceful, unquarrelsome, and unwarlike of 
our citizens. The feeling in the town was 
that the challenge was simply a new and 
clever form of advertising the " Herald." In 
the case of the proposed combat, the chances 
of a random shot were tolerably equal, for 
though Adam was some three inches longer 
in height, Chalmers was about the same in 
width, without his adversary's height. Some 
wags who frequented the "Book-Stall" were 
quite eager that this fight should be allowed 
to come off, but with this proviso, that copies 
of the respective papers should be cut out, of 
the exact size and shape, length and breadth 
of the respective editors, and that they should 
each fire at his opponent's paper. If an 
advertisement column was hit, it was to be 
considered only a flesh wound, but if the 
bullet struck the leading article, the editor of 
that paper was to consider himself as hors de 
combat. There was an immense deal of good, 
common, Aberdonian sense in this proposal, 
and had duelling been continued it might 
have been worth while taking out a patent for 
it* But the authorities were wide-awake; to 
protect the person of even an ^r-Baillie — let 
alone all other considerations, for of course 
that was the first one — they invoked the aid 
of all the Acts of Parliament at their dis- 
posal, — the challenger was bound over to 
keep the peace, and the duel was prevented. 
Some cuts and thrusts with that formidable 

* Duelling or private war having been put down, it 
is a pleasure to add that in recent naval and military 
manoeuvres the authorities have adopted a plan founded 
in principle on this invaluable suggestion. Armies 
have been conquered, ships captured, and cities taken, 
with considerable expenditure of powder, but with 
no loss of life or material damage — as our citizens 
experienced when Aberdeen was last at the mercy of 
the enemy. It is to be hoped that in the future this 
plan may be adopted in all actual warfare ; and the 
first suggester might then reasonably be thought en- 
titled to a patent of nobility, and a handsome pension 
to support the dignity, which even Trades Councillors 
would not object to, seeing that public war, as hitherto 
conducted, would then be at an end. 



134 



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weapon — the grey goose quill — were after- 
wards made between the two, but happening to 
meet at that greatest, wisest, most beneficent 
and most charitable institution in the city — 
the annual dinner of the Incorporated Trades, 
and seated near to each other, the good cheer 
around then, their hearts so unbound then, 
that a rapprochement took place, and they 
became "good billies" ever after; and so we 
ne'er shall look upon the like again. 

It is little wonder although William Forsyth, 
a later editor of the "Journal," should be so 
eloquent as he always was in praise of a good 
dinner, and a glass of wine ; " it southers 
a'thing," he used to say, "and is the greatest 
power in civilization, beating the army a' to 
sticks." He was a Captain in the Artillery 
Corps, but in the writer's opinion he would 
most willingly have met an invading army, not 
with cannon balls or grape shot, but with shells 
in the form of slop basins for the sea sick 
soldiers, and treating them afterwards to a 
good dinner with etceteras after it, would have 
sent them home again as enthusiastic admirers 
of the entente cordiale. And yet he was by no 
means a Quaker, far from it ; but he had a 
warm heart to beasts, birds, and unfortunates, 
and would have dealt with them as such, 
and killed them with kindness. 

Years ago people used to go and here the Italian 
Gazelle read, and paid a "gazetta," to be allowed to 
sit and here it. To the Italians we owe our thanks 
for the idea of news-papers, which they called 
"gazettas," from the name of the coin which paid 
for admission by all who came to here the reading. 
Some have supposed that a gazetta was the price of 
the paper, but that is quite unlikely, as the coin is of 
less value than one farthing. Others say "gaza," treas- 
ure, or "gazza" a magpie, originated the term 
"gazette." Song hawkers in London streets many 
years ago would buy their song-sheets and pay a half- 
penny fee to a man who knew the tune to sing it to 
them, that they might also know it. Some were 
quick, and caught it at once ; others were duller, and 
it was a saying then if a man knew the words of a 
song, and not the tune, that "he had not paid his 
ha'penny ! " 

Let us try and be more honourable and sportsman- 
like in criticism. Let us record our impressions. 
"This book bores me." "This book amuses me." 
Nothing else is genuine. — Andrew Lang. 



<^X 



JHere ar\d JKere, 



.KS^> 




New Half-Crown Edition of 
Dicken's works is catching on. 
The volumes are of conven- 
ient size, clear type, and con- 
tain all the original illustra- 
tions by Cruikshank, Phiz, 
&c. They are cheap at 1/11. 



So Burns has now a statue 
to keep his memory green in 
Aberdeen. If he were aware of the activity displayed 
in promoting the erection of this statue, he must think 
Aberdeen has changed considerably since the days 
when he described it as "a lazy town near Stone- 
hive." Near Stonehive, what do you think ? 



We hear that some of our visitors from the south 
want to know who the Mr. Burns is who has had a 
statue put up. Such is fame ! 



Another instance of the ignorance of some of our 
summer visitors occurred at the Bookstall the other 
day, when a gentleman admitted that he did not know 
Annie S. Swan — never heard of her — and yet we can 
sell her books by the gross. 



The nimble ninepence has crossed our counter 
oftener for her latest book, "A Bachelor in Search of 
a Wife," than for any single novel published this 
summer. The Cash Price is o,d. 



If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, 
the makers of the Ball-pointed Pens ought to be 
flattered by the latest novelty in agate styles. These 
are now being made with ball points, which prevent 
them tearing the manifold leaf. This ought to lead to 
a decrease of profanity amongst commercial travellers. 



Have you ever seen a nicer looking paper at the 
price than the Imperial Parchment Note, of which we 
send a sample with this number? The quality is 
calculated to satisfy the most fastidious, and the price 
puts it within the reach of all. 



A very neat and very cheap handy volume edition 
of Shakespeare has just been issued. The case which 
contains the 8 volumes is quite an ornament, being in 
fact a model of Shakespeare's house. 

If Gray were living now, probably his idea of Paradise 
would be to lie on a sofa, and eternally read novels by 
Mr. Stevenson. He would, perhaps, even prefer them 
to those of the younger Crebillon. Certainly one 
never wearies of them, though one prefers to inter- 
sperse them with Miss Austen and a few other favour- 
ite authors.— Andrew Lang. 



136 



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SKIN g^ESSIflC 

Every description of Home and Foreign 
Skins carefully prepared and beautifully 
mounted on cloth. Deer Skins Dressed 
and Manufactured into Hearth and 
Hall Rugs. Old Mats Cleaned, Re- 
dyed, and made equal to new. It is important that 
these goods should be sent to the Actual Manufacturer, 
in order that they may receive immediate and proper 
attention. 

ALEXANDER LAING, 
Rodger's Walk, John Street, Aberdeen. 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



137 



Let the holiday-maker take away with him neither the 
most recent "romance of adventure," nor the newest 
produce of the New Humour, nor the report of the 
proceedings of the British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, nor the last neo-theological dissert- 
ation (in three volumes, bound and lettered to look 
like a novel), but in their place some English classic ; 
not, of course — Heaven forbid that one should suggest 
such a thing ! — in an unabridged form, pudding as well 
as plums, but in the shape of one of those volumes of 
"Selections," which busy scholars and critics now 
provide for lazy readers. — H. D. Traill. 

We have for sale, a Hand Camera, sceond-hand. 
It is in perfect working order, and may be seen, along 
with specimens of pictures taken with it, at 77 Union 
Street. 



39 ft so? 

The Phrenological Magazine publishes an article this 
month to show that eminent men are generally small 
of stature. Referring to literary men, it says — we are 
reminded of a remark made to the writer by a grand- 
son of Jerrold's that " most of us scribblers look best 
on paper, " and so far as physical comeliness goes, that 
seems the case. 

Bocchoris, one of the wisest and most able of 
Egyptian kings was a dwarf. /Esop is represented as 
a mis-shapen hop-o'-my-thumb. Horace was a sleek, 
fat little man. Confucius, the great Chinese sage, 
only reached middle height. Shakespeare was seem- 
ingly never measured, or if he were, his height has 
not been handed down ; Milton was rather short ; 
Dryden, "Poet Squab," was dumpy, as was also 
Lord Macaulay. 

Mrs. Carlyle speaks of " poor little Dickens " ; his 
rival, Thackeray, boasting of a larger allowance of 
inches, though not of brain power. Moore was only 
five feet, and when it was known that he and "Thomas 
Little " were the same writer, a wag remarked that 
"Moore is Little, and Little is Moore"; Cowper 
barely reached middle height ; Pope was a pigmy of 
four feet six, and Voltaire and Scarron were mere 
Liliputians ; while Swift's giant intellect was lodged 
in the brain of a rather stout, ungainly man, utterly 
unattractive, of just five feet eight. 



Mr. WILLIAM FORBES SKENE. 



We extract the following account of a distinguished 
local literary man from the Publishers' Circular : — 

"We regret to record the death of Mr. William 
Forbes Skene, D.C.L. &c, Her Majesty's Historio- 
grapher for Scotland, and a distinguished archaeologist, 
scholar, and historian. He expired at his residence 
in Inverleith Row, Edinburgh, on the 29th ult., in 
his 84th year. Mr. Skene was born at Inverie, 
Kincardineshire, on June 7, 1809. He was educated 



at the Edinburgh High School, then studied for a year 
and a half in Germany, and finally passed a session 
each at the Universities of Edinburgh and St. Andrews. 
Quite early in life he began to devote himself to the 
study of Scotch history and antiquities, particularly as 
relating to Celtic history and traditions. It being 
thought advisable, however, that he should be brought 
up to some profession, he was apprenticed at the age 
of" eighteen to his uncle, Sir Henry Jardine, W.S., 
and was admitted a member of the Signet Society in 
1 83 1. His father, Mr. James Skene, of Rubislaw, 
Aberdeen, was an intimate friend of Sir Watter Scott, 
who dedicated to him the fourth canto of ' Marmion,' 
in stanzas setting forth their close and affectionate 
relations, and it is on record that on one occasion 
(April 1 831) Mr. Skene paid a visit with his father to 
Abbotsford, and had the privilege of walking in the 
company of the celebrated 'Wizard of the North' to 
Yarrow. Not long after he became a Writer to the 
Signet, Mr. Skene received an official appointment 
in the Bill Chamber of the Court of Session, and this 
connection was retained until 1865, after which time 
he devoted himself to his favourite studies and to 
private practice. It was, however, in antiquarian and 
literary pursuits, and not in the legal profession, that 
he achieved distinction. He devoted much time 
to researches into the remote, obscure, and difficult 
parts of Scotch history, and gradually acquired for 
himself the reputation of one of the most erudite 
archaeologists of Scotland. His first essay, entitled 
' The Highlands of Scotland : their Orgin, History, 
Antiquities,' was published in 1837, and it was 
awarded the prize of the Highland Society. His next 
work was not issued before 1862, when he edited and 
published 'The Dean of Lizmore's Book.' In 1868 
he issued 'The Four Ancient Books of Wales,' and in 
the following year 'The Coronation Stone.' He like- 
wise edited 'The Chronicles of the Picts and Scots,' 
'Fordun's Chronicle of the Scottish Nation,' and 
several other works on kindred subjects. At length, 
in 1876-80, he produced his great work 'Celtic 
Scotland : a History of Ancient Alban,' in three 
volumes. For upwards of forty years he had been 
collecting the materials for this book, of which a 
second edition recently passed through the press. The 
first volume of this important work, ' History and 
Ethnology,' appeared in 1876 ; the second, ' Church 
and Culture,' in 1877 ; and the third, ' Land and 
People,' in 1880. 'If Mr. Skene had written nothing 
else,' says the Times, to whom we are indebted for 
much of our information, '"Celtic Scotland" would 
well have justified his appointment to the ancient 
office of Historiographer Royal to Scotland, to which 
he was appointed on the death of Dr. John Hill 
Burton in 1881.' At various periods in his life, Mr. 
Skene filled the offices of vice-president of the Royal 
Society of Edinburgh, of the Cambrian Archaeological 
Society, and of the Society of Antiquaries of Edinburgh. 
He contributed many papers to these Societies, which 
were subsequently published in there 'Proceedings,' 
and also to the chief of the magazines and reviews. 
He was likewise for many years secretary to the Royal 
Institution for the Promotion of the Fine Arts." 



i 3 8 Brown's Book-Stall. 



TTENTIQN! 

is directed to the sample of Imperial 

Parchment Note which is sent with 

this number. No one who wishes 

a really high-class Note Paper at 

a reasonable price can do better 

than give this paper a trial. 

We supply a 5 Quire Packet 
with your address printed and 
[ 100 Envelopes to match for 3/3 

A. Brown & Co., jj Union Street. 

Novelties at Collie & Taylors, 

123 Union Street. 




The "Kingsburgh" Tea and Cake Stand. 
" Stapleton " Ware— a Novely in Pottery. 
"Sentence Making and Taking"— the New Game. 
"Parlez-vous Franeais?"— the New Game for Students of French 
LAMP and CANDLE SHADES— first deliveries for the Season. 
Novel and Elegant Designs. 



Bon- Accord Bazaar, 123 Union Street. 

Telephone 579. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



*39 



From "The Silverado Squatters:" 
By Robert Louis Stevenson. 

TT^HE happiest lot on earth is to be born a 
\ I / Scotchman. You must pay for it in many ways, 
& I v9 as for all other advantages on earth. You 
■*■ have to learn the Paraphrases and the 
Shorter Catechism ; you generally take to 
drink ; your youth, as far as I can find out, is a time 
of louder war against society, of more out-cry and 
tears and tormoil, than if you had been born, for 
instance, in England. But somehow life is warmer 
and closer ; the hearth burns more redly ; the lights 
of home shine softer on the rainy street ; the very 
names, endeared in verse and music, cling nearer 
round our hearts. An Englishman may meet an 
Englishman to-morrow, upon Chimborazo, and neither 
of them care ; but when the Scotch wine-grower told 
me of Mons Meg, it was like magic. 

From the dim shieling on the misty island 
Mountains divide us, and a world of seas ; 

Yet still our hearts are true, our hearts are Highland, 
And we, in dreams, behold the Hebrides. 

And, Highland and Lowland, all our hearts are 
Scotch. 

Only a few days after I had seen M'Eckron, a 
message reached me in my cottage. It was a Scotch- 
man who had come down a long way from the hills to 
market. He had heard there was a countryman in 
Calistoga, and came round to the hotel to see him. 
We said a few words to each other ; we had not 
much to say — should never have seen each other had 
we stayed at home, separated alike in space and in 
society ; and then we shook hands, and he went his 
way again to his ranche among the hills, and that 
was all. 

Another Scotchman there was, a resident, who for 
the mere love of the common country, douce, serious, 
religious man, drove me all about the valley, and 
took as much interest in me as if I had been his son : 
more, perhaps ; for the son has faults too keenly felt, 
while the abstract countryman is perfect — like a whiff 
of peats. 

And there was yet another. Upon him I came 
suddenly, as he was calmly entering my cottage, his 
mind quite evidently bent on plunder ; a man of about 
fifty, filthy, ragged, roguish, with a chimney-pot hat 
and a tail coat, and a pursing of his mouth that 
might have been envied by an elder of the kirk. He 
had just such a face as I have seen a dozen times 
behind the plate. 

" Hallo, sir ! " I cried. " Where are you going ? " 

He turned round without a quiver. 

"You're a Scotchman, sir?" he said gravely. "So 
ami; I come from Aberdeen. This is my card," s 
presenting me with a piece of pasteboard which he 
had raked out of some gutter in the period of the 
rains. " I was just examining this palm," he con- 
tinued, indicating the misbegotten plant before our 
door, "which is the largest specimen I have yet 
observed in Califoarnia." 



There were four or five larger within sight. But 
where was the use of argument? He produced a 
tape-line, made me help him to measure the tree at 
the level of the ground, and entered the figures in a 
large and filthy pocket-book, all with the gravity of 
Solomon. He then thanked me profusely, remarking 
that such little services were due between country- 
men ; shook hands with me, "for auld lang syne," as 
he said ; and took himself solemnly away, radiating 
dirt and humbug as he went. 

A month or two after this encounter of mine, there 
came a Scot to Sacramento— perhaps from Aberdeen. 
Anyway, there never was any one more Scotch in this 
wide world. He could sing and dance, and drink, I 
presume ; and he played the pipes with vigour and 
success. All the Scotch in Sacramento became in- 
fatuated with him, and spent their spare time and 
money, driving him about in an open cab, between 
drinks, while he blew himself scarlet at the pipes. 
This is a very sad story. After he had borrowed 
money from every one, he and his pipes suddenly dis- 
appeared from Sacramento, and when I last heard, 
the police were looking for him. 

I cannot say how this story amused me, when I felt 
myself so thoroughly ripe on both sides to be duped 
in the same way. 

It is at least a curious thing, to conclude, that the 
races which wander widest, Jews and Scotch, should 
be the most clannish in the world. But perhaps 
these two are cause and effect : " For ye were strangers 
in the land of Egypt." 



From The Star of 15th September, we quote — # 'Here is a 
curious paragraph to hand by yesterday's Australian mail — 

'Robert Louis Stevenson goes about in Samoa in the attire 

of an Australian black-fellow, and is frequently accompanied 

by a lady who smokes cigarettes.' 
The picture of the popular^ novelist in his Pacific paradise that 
appeared a few months ago in Black and White astonished some 
of" his old friends by the breezy brevity of his attire. But if this 
latest information be correct no illustrated London paper will 
venture to show us Mr. Stevenson as he now perambulates his 
island of tropical delights." 

Works by Robert Louis Stevenson. 



Familiar Studies of Men and Books, 

The Merry Men, 

Memories and Portraits, 

Virginibus Puerisque, ... 

The Silverado Squatters, 

Underwoods: poems, ... 

Ballads, ... 

Travels with a Donkey, 

An Inland Voyage, 

Kidnapped, ... .. ... ... 

Treasure Island, 

The Black Arrow : A Tale of the Two Roses, 

The Master of Ballantrae, 

The Wrecker, 

Across the Plains, 

These Prices for Cash only. 



s. 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

1 11 

1 11 



A. BROWN & CO., 
77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



140 



Brown's Book-Stall. 







Cabinet /Ifcafcers ano Xflpbolsterers, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shorn Rooms at 



257 llfHOJi STREET, 



and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and upholstery Goods. 



ZX)C Cabinet jf UVnttUre made in their own Workshop will 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



ftbeiv flew Carpet Saloon is stocked wi * ' the , , 

best makes of 

British and Foreign Carpets \ Linoleums, 
Mattings y Rugs, &c, 
|h|- Curtains and Upholstery Materials. 

IbOlbUm Cabinet WOrkS are now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



Sutumn Purchases in 

°^|^F^ Flanne l g , an 4 nne i etteg , 



are now delivered. 



EARLY INSPECTION SOLICITED. 



Robert Henderson, 

33 & 35 Union Street, Aberdeen 



Established 1870. 




Gordon & Watt, 

Deeorative Ipaintws & Qlass ^tainers. 

iaineci anci Opnamenial drlass feeacLeol Wopk |op Eeekjsiajsiieal op 
Domestic Puppojseg ; Memoplal Winclows, D^ap^ Sepeens, Doop 
Panels. &e., lie., apti^ticall^ anci effectively executed. 

ESTIMATES AND DESIGNS ON APPLICATION. 

DESIGNS entrusted to them by Architects will be carefully carried out. 

PAINTED POTTERY AND OTHER WARE FIRED. 

iidicf £ctoxatUu Materials in Tynecaslle Canvas, Lincrusta- Walton, Anaglypta, 
Japanese, and other Wall Hangings of the Best Manufacture. 



39 W00LMANH1LL I II I 25 BLACKFRIARS. STREET. 
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SOLE MAKER of the 



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has / <^T^ o^ // 5 per cent. Discount 

remoyedA^v 



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to Cash Purchasers. 




Published at jj Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. 10. 



OCTOBER. 



Telegrams- — "Lorimer, Bootmaker, Aberdeen." 

James MtM & Son, 

Boot & Shoe Saloons, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 

157 Union Street, Aberdeen, 

jLJAVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, 

including every variety of 

Boots, |3hoes and J8li££ers 

For Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 
In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly qn hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which* is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shooting, Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ©rbers of B*>er£ ^Description fl&afce to •fl&easure. 



RIDING BOOTS. 
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in Every Way. 



BY SPECIAL WARRANT MAKERS TO H.M. THE QUEEN. 
CONTRACTORS TO H.M. GOVERNMENT 



The Type- Writer Company, Ltd., 

22(1 Renfield Street, Glasgow. 

P. M. DURWARD, Manager. 
Aberdeen Agents— A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street. 

By Special Appointment Patronised b-j 

Ro yal China Saloo ns 

To The Queen. s ^M^B^sJ^ ir H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 





John Ford & Co., 

©lass and China (Dei^chanfs, 

136 & 138 Union Street, 
^x rberpeej3. x^> 

^Isq at 39 prinees ^treet, and t^elyreeel Gflass werks, 
cX^X EB+fsl BLl ^\\ K^k, 




No. 10. 



OCTOBER. 



I5Q2. 



Brown's Hberfceen Boofe=5taU. 



No. X. 



'Aberdeen Awa." — concluded. 




UT they [that is, these Aberdeen 
wags] were not without others on 
whom they could exercise their 
powers. There was an official 
man with a body and mind singularly out of 
proportion to each other, who had been chief 
conscience-keeper to the Corporation, as him- 
self once said before a Committee of the 
House of Commons 'Ay, sin' his father 
dee-ed' who was well adapted to their 
purpose. He was remarkable for good 
nature and credulity; and though he was 
secure in a decent living, and perhaps felt the 
sting of a practical joke less than any other 
man, one feels some compunction at the 
thought that so very harmless a personage 
should have been officially placed in Aber- 
deen. But placed there he is, in a public 
office, and therefore the cabinet of curiosities 
would not be complete without him." 

There is here, probably a shrewd estimate 
of the private character of William Carnegie, 
who was appointed Town Clerk in 1793, an d 
continued in office until his death in May, 
1840, but it conveys a most unjust impression 
of him as a public official ; in which capacity 
it is impossible to examine his books or to 
read his evidence before the Committee of 



the House of Commons in 181 9, without 
being satisfied that he was an exceedingly 
able public servant ; that he had a private 
conscience which sometimes came into con- 
flict with the public conscience enjoined upon 
him by the Council. His lot in life was at 
an unfortunate period, inasmuch, as — brought 
up and trained in an old world school — he had 
to unlearn all his old notions, and to face an 
entirely new system, where secrecy and con- 
cealment were condemned, and openness and 
publicity were demanded. In his careful 
dress, his stately demeanour, his powdered 
hair, which, like Provost Henry he wore to the 
last as a protest against democratic notions 
he was 

A fine old Scottish gentleman 

All of the olden time. 

"As the stories that have been repeated to 
me of tricks played to this official person 
would fill a volume, I shall content myself 
with mentioning one. As no Corporation 
stands charged with the sin of too deter- 
minedly muzzling the mouths of its official 
steers, they are in general very fond of 
conviviality ; and it is far from being un- 
common, that they whose conversation rates 
the lowest in quality, are the most desirous 
to make up the difference in quantity. The 
wags in question knew this was the case with 
the man who got office 'when his father 
died,' and thus they invited him to an even- 
ing party at one of the hotels, when they 
encouraged him to become thirsty with speech, 
and to quench that with wine. In the end 
he was overpowered, and sank into the 
embrace of the leaden god. They had 



I42 Brown's Book-Stall. 



nglish J^^anufacturcs. 

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Brown's Book-Stall. 



143 



previously turned the conversation to the 
place of final retribution, with the horrors of 
which they had deeply impressed his mind. 
When they found that he was fairly asleep, 
they stretched him out on the table, covered 
him with a white cloth, arranged the room 
and candles in the way which is customary 
when death has ensued ; at the same time 
they placed the glasses in such a manner as 
that by the least motion these should fall with 
a crash and awaken him, and they set open 
the windows. They then left him to his fate, 
and went into another apartment to await 
the issue. 

"At the silent hour there was a tremendous 
crash of the glasses, at which they hastened 
to the scene, and found that it had awakened 
the sleeper, but had not produced all the 
effect they had expected, as they found him 
thus soliloquising with himself: — 'Well, that 
I'm deed is a clear case ; a leevin man was 
never laid out this gate ; but I'm very thank- 
ful that it's nae waar. I'm deed, but I'm nae 
damned, that's certain ; this canna be hell, 
it's sae awfu' caul !' " 

Attorneys have always been considered fair 
game for jokers, and our wags must surely have 
had a saying of Sam Foote's in mind when 
this trick was played. A simple country 
English farmer who had just buried a rich 
relation, an attorney, complained to Foote of 
the expense, and was told by him that in 
London they never buried attorneys. " What ! 
how then do you manage?" "Oh! we just 
lay him out in a room, lock the door, after 
opening the windows, and in the morning 
there is not a trace of him." "Indeed," said 
the farmer, "Why? what becomes of him?" 
"Well" said Foote "we cannot exactly tell; 
all we know is that there's a strong smell of 
brimstone in the room the next morning." 

"But perhaps the most singular instance of 
credulity on the one hand, and waggery on 
the other, was that of 'Bailie Nicholas Jarvie'; 
because that took place under circumstances 
that might, one would think, have rendered 
it impossible. Scott's novel of 'Rob Roy'* 
had been published for at least a year and 



* ' ' Rob Roy " appeared in 1 8 1 8, and A. Brown & Co. 
paid 30/- for the carriage of their first supply by mail. 



a half; it had been very generally read in 
Scotland, and it is not easy to suppose that it 
had not been heard of in Aberdeen, or that 
in so short a time it would have been forgotten ; 
and even though that had been the case, the 
drama founded upon it had been acted almost 
nightly in the city for a whole season. Taking 
all this into consideration, it is not easy to 
imagine how the greatest ignoramus in the 
world could be deceived respecting the Bailie; 
yet I am assured that such was the case with 
an official gentlemen connected with the 
Aberdeen Corporation, and connected with it 
solely on account of his presumed wisdom 
and learning. 

"That official personage was appointed to go 
to Glasgow, ex officio, which he regarded as an 
event in his life, and he was at great pains in 
promulgating it. During several days pre- 
vious he was found constantly in the streets 
and public places, where he accosted all that 
he knew, informed them of his impending 
journey, and asked their commands for Glas- 
gow ; and every evening he paraded the 
Athenaeum or public reading room, announc- 
ing the great exploit that was before him. 
Late on the eve of his departure, two gentle- 
men accosted him in the room, congratulating 
him on his journey, and on the great height 
to which the character of Aberdeen would be 
raised by his appearance in the city of the 
West ; but they added that the people of 
Glasgow would be afraid to 'come out/ if he 
had not a personal introduction to some 
official person, regretting at the same time 
that they were not sufficiently acquainted in 
Glasgow to supply what he wanted. At that 
moment a third joined them as if by accident, 
'Ha!' said the other two, 'you are just the 
man we wanted, you know Mr. Jarvie of 
Glasgow!' — 'What, Nicholas Jarvie the 
Bailie of the Salt Market ? most intimately ! 
many a happy hour have I spent in his 
company ; the Bailie is a glorious fellow.' — 
'Will you give our friend a letter to him ?' — 
'With the utmost pleasure; as I am sure, I 
cannot confer a greater favour on my friend 
Mr. Jarvie.' The letter was instantly written, 
couched in the most familiar terms, with high 
enconiums on the bearer, who was told that 
he might make Mr. Jarvie's his first place of 



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45 



call, and his house during his sojourn, as in 
Glasgow, that was accounted far more respec- 
table than lodging at an inn. 

"The official personage was delighted, and 
kept the letter a secret, in order that he might 
turn the Bailie's hospitality the more to his 
own account when he returned. Meanwhile 
the conspirators despatched an express to 
Glasgow, to prepare for the reception of their 
dupe ; and in the morning that personage 
took coach for Glasgow, blessing himself all 
the way on account of his introduction to 'a 
Glasgow magistrate,' which, in his sense of 
the words, did not mean 'a fresh herring.' 

"From the high hopes of the traveller the 
journey seemed more than usually long, 
though he deferred all his calls upon his 
official brethren in the intermediate towns 
till his return, when he would be able to 
repeat to them all the attentions that he had 
received from Bailie Jarvie. But how much 
soever expectation may lengthen time, it does 
not make it last for ever ; and so the stranger 
in Glasgow at last bowed to the statue of 
William in the Trongate, and the jolting 
ceased at the Tontine. 

"'Now for Bailie Jarvie,' he thought with 
himself, asking the way to the Salt Market, 
and if the Bailie lived there. He did, but 
the informant did not know the number; 
anybody would point out the house. A 
porter absolutely anticipated the stranger's 
wish by shouldering the portmanteau and 
following. The description had been ac- 
curately given, and the Glasgow agents had 
found their man. The porter did not know 
the Bailie's house, but that caused no suspi- 
cion. The Salt Market is the Petticoat Lane 
of Glasgow, with something to boot, and the 
stranger and his porter trudged three-flight 
high upon every common stair in it, where 
the former ran the gauntlet after a most 
annoying fashion ; but no Bailie Jarvie could 
be found ; and they were marching back to 
the starting post, when a stranger bowed most 
politely to our traveller. 'I hae been looking 
for Bailie Jarvie, but he's nae in a' the Saat 
Market.' — 'Sold his house there two years 
ago, and lives out of town ; but I saw him in 
the public coffee-room this moment, and I 
know that he is there still reading the papers ; 
anybody will point him out.' 



"Now though there was no real Bailie 
Jarvie in Glasgow, the name had no sooner 
become celebrated than the wags of that town 
applied it to one of the bailies there, who 
gave them very little thanks for their trouble ; 
and was so very wroth that he would neither 
read the novel, nor attend the play. He was 
reading the paper when the stranger entered 
asking for 'Bailie Jarvie.' There was no need 
of pointing him out, for the sound no sooner 
reached his ears than he started up to inflict 
punishment on the party by whom, as he 
supposed, he had been wantonly insulted ; 
but the size and respectful deportment of the 
stranger, and above all, his northern accent, 
as he stood bowing and presenting his letter, 
suspended the ire of the magistrate ; and the 
appearance of the three gentlemen who had 
aided him in seeking the bailie and who now 
introduced the two to each other by their 
respective names and offices, completely 
removed it. The result was an adjournment 
to the Black Bull, where the official man 
found in the substantial hospitality of Glas- 
gow, that the introduction was not wholly a 
loss. Upon the traveller's return to Aber- 
deen, those who had played the first act of 
the farce tried to laugh at him ; but his reply- 
was 'let those laugh that win ; and when I go 
back to Glasgow, I shall be glad to have a 
letter to another Bailie Jarvie. You were 
right, the Bailie is a 'glorious fellow.'" 

"I must confess," says the writer, "that it 
is rather melancholy to be obliged thus to 
record the intellectual state of a city which 
carries on a very extensive and successful 
trade . . . and contains a great deal of 
wealth ; ... it mortifies even me to be 
obliged to record anecdotes like these as the 
only means of showing that there are in the 
city any talents except trading ones." He 
warns readers not to judge of the character of 
the people superficially for "the talents which 
in Aberdeen lead to those practices can find 
no more useful channel there, or we may rest 
assured they would run into it." Which came 
quite true in the case of Sir Alexander 
Bannerman, when he got the opportunity of 
showing his abilities. 

Such is a resume, with copious extracts 
from this article, so interesting to Aberdonians 



146 



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147 



as showing the manners of the upper class in 
Aberdeen, in the early years of the century, 
that for fifty years back, it has been the 
dream and the desire of the writer to re- 
produce it for preservation in some form or 
other. It contains also an account of 
"Downie's Slaughter," an escapade of the 
students, which ended in such a tragical 
manner, that from an amiable weakness 
against all stories with unhappy endings, it 
was thought best to reject it, especially as it 
is reproduced in Rettie's "Aberdeen Fifty 
Years Ago," (pp. 126-9), where all can read 
who choose. 

The vivid picture presented by the article 
of the doings of young Aberdeen at the 
beginning of the century may appear incred- 
ible to the present staid and sober generation 
— for as compared with the past it is both of 
these — but some few, alas ! getting fewer 
every month now, can yet recollect the excite- 
ment and the laughter produced by seeing 
or hearing of Sandy Bannerman's latest es- 
capade, which brilliantly lightened up the 
dullness, and pleasantly rippled the surface 
of the stagnant times, to all save those who 
were the victims. But, truly, who were not 
so? In the spring of 1822, a severe storm 
had buried the whole country in such deep 
snow-drifts that no London mail had arrived 
for nearly a fortnight. Think of it ! Then 
ennui reigned supreme, for gossip was ex- 
hausted, and the latest scandal had been 
killed by repetition. Time hung heavy on 
the hands and minds of the citizens, and they 
were ready to welcome anything to talk about. 
So in order to beguile the time, Sandy and 
some boon companions, after supper in the 
New Inn, prolonged their sitting until the 
small hours were well past, when, getting 
post-horses, they quietly rode out to the 
Bridge of Dee, as far as the drifts allowed 
them, and then came riding back, lustily 
blowing post-horns all the way, as an intended 
intimation of the arrival of the long expected 
mail. The ruse was successful, and the ex- 
citement was tremendous ; and as the noisy 
cavalcade passed along Union Street in the 
wild waste of the dark morning, every sleeper 
was aroused, and every window opened by 
eager expectants of news, who, after hastily 



dressing, hurried down to the Post-Office, 
then in the Cross, to get their letters and the 
latest news ; but only to be told to their 
mortification, that no mail had come, but that 
Sandy Bannerman had arrived. That was 
quite enough, — all knew then that they had 
been "sold," and were the victims of his lat- 
est joke, and were inclined to say, as Sir 
Walter Scott said to the authoress of "Mysti- 
fications," "Awa, awa ! the deil's o'er grit wi' 
you ! " 

As Leslie Stephen characterizes Walter 
Savage Landor as having for nearly ninety 
years been a typical English public school 
boy, so of Sandy Bannerman it might be said 
that he was a typical Scotch school boy, a 
"loon," full of humour, fond of tricks, ready 
to trip up his teacher at night by putting string 
across the pavement, capable of placing point- 
ed tacks on his chair, or lighted squibs and 
crackers in his coat tail pockets. 

But if he was the chief ringleader in many 
a mad trick, invariably playing first fiddle in 
the frolics in which he and his companions 
indulged ; in the license which they seemed 
to enjoy in defiance of the representatives of 
law and order, the town's officers, Clapperton 
"with his cleek,"' Simon Grant, and young 
Charlie Dawson, they were not without 
imitators. 

When an election of a member of parlia- 
ment took place, when the races were held, or 
a county club dinner or ball came off, or any 
event which brought into town the Duke of 
Gordon with his lively Duchess, the shooting 
Earl of Kintore, Lords Panmure, Kennedy, 
and other landed proprietors, unlimited high 
jinks were indulged in during their stay ; 
then night was abolished, or made hideous 
with their noisy revels, in which license was 
allowed its full swing. Crowds collected in 
Castle Street before Dempster's Inn, from the 
open windows of which shovelfuls of coppers, 
toasted over the fire until they were nearly red 
hot, were freely scattered amongst the crowd, 
and the eager scramble which ensued, with 
the shouts and yells of the heated-copper 
collectors afforded the "distinguished comp- 
any" unmitigated delight. A volume might 
be filled with examples, but enough has been re- 
corded to show the habits of high class society. 



148 



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149 



Of course these were copied and reflected 
in the conduct of the lower classes, and the 
King's birthday in these old times afforded 
them a saturnalia in which mischief towards 
property, and brutal violence to any one 
apparently above their own rank were the 
principal features. For the gratification of 
the mob a huge bonfire was kindled in Castle 
Street, but if it threatened to go out too soon, 
the mob would rush down to the Inches, and 
seizing a boat would haul it up Marischal 
Street by the force of numbers, and consign it 
to the flames. And on that evening, woe be- 
tide the man who appeared with a decent hat 
on his head. The mob greeted him, not with 
the French Revolutionary cry of "aristocrat," 
but on the shout of "a tile, a tile," the owner 
of a hat was jostled, kicked and cuffed, and 
it was well when the mob was satisfied with 
the destruction of the hat. If he defended 
it too vigorously he was in positive danger of 
loss of limb or life. 

This training of young men in licensed 
ruffianism, was the school in which boys 
were trained in mischief, and the effect of it 
is not yet extinct. In those far back days, 
crowds were always dangerous against the 
better classes ; while only the other day at 
the opening of the Infirmary, amidst the 
dense thronging multitude in the streets, 
the duty of the police was not to preserve the 
peace ; of that there was no danger of breach ; 
it was not to protect the Princesses — why, 
every one of the vast assemblage would not 
only have spread out on the mud their cloaks 
and shawls (like Sir Walter Raleigh) for the 
Princesses to step on, but it looked as if every 
one there would have given their very lives 
for them. The whole duty of the police con- 
sisted in protecting the crowd against them- 
selves, their eager pressure, and their own 
devoted and exuberant loyalty ; not only did 
they protect them from the passing vehicles, 
but they enabled them to see all that was to 
be seen more satisfactorily. And, when, in the 



eagerness of the crowd to get so near to the 
Princess, that they might touch the hem of 
her garment, and when the argumentun ad 
hominem failed to put the crowd farther back, 
and to open up more space, then it was simply 
delightful to see the effect of the argument of 
horses brought into play. The mounted 
police backed their steeds on the crowd, and 
the gentle, well trained, kindly treated brutes 
behaved like very gentlemen. Horses of the 
last century, not having the benefit of a cheap 
press, and of evening half-penny papers, would 
have applied the only argument they knew, 
that of hoofs, and the only argument then 
known, that of brute force, but, now recog- 
nising the fact that force is no remedy, not a 
hoof was lifted, but more by the application 
of soft, gentle, warm, horse-haunch and 
whisked-tail, than by the appeal of their 
riders, the crowd were borne back, and a clear 
way opened. 

With peculiar satisfaction one near him 
heard Chief Constable Wyness say, that 
the time seemed fast approaching when 
Aberdeen might dispense with the police 
altogether, the inhabitants were so well dis- 
posed. It is a very high compliment, and 
yet to those who have travelled on the Con- 
tinent, and seen the unenclosed parks, the 
unprotected beds of deliciously scented 
flowers planted along the streets, and the 
grass plots, on which not a foot would dare to 
tread, because every citizen acts as a police- 
man and would instantly protect from injury 
what he knew was his own property — to those 
who have seen this, it is evident that we have 
not yet quite arrived at perfection, but are 
approaching it. Many years ago an excited 
old wife said to some ill-behaved Aberdeen 
bairns, "Ye've got plenty o' skweelin' but vera 
little breedin'." Let us hope that the time is 
approaching when young Aberdeen will have 
both, and in equal quantities, with their proper 
educational results. 



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Twixt Shine and Storm 

A Lay Sermon for the Season. 




N this road to-day, 
well up above the city, 
overlooking Aberdeen 
bay on the east and part 
jrgp" of the far-stretching Grampians 
on the south, how subtle is the 
change on the scene since a few short weeks ago. When 
last I swung along between this dyke and that hedge- 
row the air was heavy with the ripeness of summer, 
the field -hands bent their blistering backs in the early 
afternoon sun, and the brown sails of multitudinous 
fishing-boats loomed in the blue bay yonder as they 
passed from between the long arms of the twin piers. 
Now the highway is sodden and the hedgerow damp, 
and robin, fluttering disconsolately among the branches 
or on the coping of the wall, emits his short, anxious 
chirp, as if bidding a brief, tremulous goodbye to the 
fading glory of the year, on his way to the city which 
is to be his home during the winter. His short bar of 
bird music may well be anxious ; for a few weeks 
more will see this road and all the surrounding pro- 
spect filled with the blinding, whirling snows or the 
pelting, lashing, washing, weary, bleary rains of 
November ; and what then will robin's fate in the 
city be ? 

Yet when I consider the alternation of the seasons, 
I feel a certain amount of sympathy with the saying 
that whatever is is right. We tire of the summer after 
she has been with us a few months, just as we shall 
tire of the winter when the days begin to lengthen out 
towards the end of March. Because I hate monotony, 
whether pleasant or painful, I should not care to live 
always beneath Italian skies, with a perennially unruffled 
climate. I want change (both atmospheric and of the 
jingling sort) ; and as the leaves shimmer and shiver 
and flutter down one by one, and the wind hustles 
them along the cart-ruts and into the oozy ditch by the 
wayside, I look forward with quiet glee to the winter. 
To the "lang forenichts," when, with the wind roaring 
in the chimney, and driving rain, hail, or snow against 
the rattling windows, I shall snuggle by the fire with 
the immortals for company. While the gas sings over- 
head, and the cat sits purring on the hassock just 
outside the fender, and the firelight winks on the 
company of silent friends ranged around on the walls, 
ready to be wise and eloquent at my bidding, I shall 
appropriately read from the page of the Incomparable 
One how 

Icicles hang by the wall, 

And Dick the shepherd blows his nail, 
And Tom bears logs into the hall, 

A nd viilk comes frozen home in pail, 
When blood is nipped and ways be fottl, 
Then nightly sings the staring oivl — 

To-whoo ; 
To-whit, to-whoo, a merry note, 
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot. 



When all aloud the wind doth blow, 

And coughing drowns the parsons saw, 
And birds sit brooding in the snow, 

And Marions nose looks red and raw, 
When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl, 
Then nightly sings the staring owl — 

To-whoo ; 
To-zuhit, to-whoo, a merry note, 
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot. 

There never was written such another winter 
song as that, with its concentration, its wealth of 
suggestion, its picture in every line. And yet people 
who have not read " Love's Labour Lost," can spare 
the time to read morbid, dismal stuff like " Nana," and 
the mechanical "realism" of the Russian Tourgenieffs 
and Dostoieffskies. But, of course, you won't get 
people to admit that they haven't read every word of 
Shakespere, the Bible, and Sir Walter Scott. They 
read all these in the dim and distant past. And not 
only the authorised Protestant Bible, but all the 
Apocryphal books ; not only all Scott's novels, but 
all Scott's poems as well ; with Josephus, Klop- 
stock's "Messiah," Mosheim's "Church History," 
"The Decline and Fall," and, in a word, all those 
tough old warriors, in sombre calf, who bulk so largely 
in the lower shelves of our bookcases. Yes ; they have 
read all these ; and, having swept down the centuries, 
taking in the best that has been thought and said in 
each successive age, they now seek their intellectual 
fare in the necromantic clap-trap of "She," the shilling 
shockers of Gaboriau, Conway, and Du Boisgobey, 
with an occasional harking back to the stale old smut 
of Paul de Kock. Why can't we be more honest with 
one another as to the nature and extent of our reading. 
We don't impose upon anybody with our bookish 
gasconade ; though Brown is induced to brag because 
Smith does it. I have been reading good literature 
closely, summer and winter, from the time I could 
read at all until now that my spouse plucks an 
occasional gray hair from my haffets ; I have seldom 
gone to the play o' nights ; and am a retired person 
altogether ; yet there is still much of Plutarch that I 
have not read ; still much of Tacitus, Plato, Froissart's 
"Chronicles," Spalding's "Trubles," D'Aubigne's 
" Reformation," the Bible, and the Apocrypha — still 
much of all these common old books that I hope in 
some measure to overcome during the approaching 
winter. 

And yet you young cubs whom I see waltzing and flirt- 
ing with the saucy creatures you call "tarts "among 
yourselves ; who ogle barmaids and actresses ; whom I 
have seen at lawn tennis out west in the cool July even- 
ings ; you who whip about these roads on your ' ' bikes ; " 
who climb hills, and take snap-shot photographs at the 
most unheard-of things in the most unheard-of places — 
you expect people to believe that you have sucked the 
marrow out of the ancients, and that you are on terms 
of familiarity with the great moderns also ! Go to ; 
I know something of what a man may do in a life-time. 
If I have such a weight of arrears and obligations to 
all that is best of ancient and modern literature, how 
much more parlous must your state be did ye but know 
it ! Don't suppose that I burrow among musty tomes 
alone, or that my haunts are exclusively those of the 
winding maggot ! I could not lie easy in bed at nights 



52 



Brown's Book-Stall. 







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Brown's Book-Stall. 



53 



if I had not largely sampled Darwin, Spencer, Ruskin, 
and Mill. You will find me knowing in my Tolstoi, 
and I have been "Across the Plains," have sailed for 
"A Week on the Concord and Merrimac Rivers," 
with " Three Men in a Boat," have looked from a 
"Window in Thrums" at the " Little Minister" pass- 
ing by, and kept company with those " Soldiers 
Three" who, "Under the Deodars," so meta- 
morphosed the canteen sergeant's dog. 

But let me remind you, young men, that the ancients 
were something more than literary journeymen, making 
books for a livelihood, as are your Langs and Besants 
of to-day. My Senecas, Sydneys, Miltons, and 
Clarendons turned to writing from the court and the 
camp, from statecraft and the battle-field, and their 
books represent the knowledge and experience of a 
life-time spent amid the scenes and the times of great 
actions. Their conception and treatment are native 
and indigenous because they had little of style to 
imitate or of tradition to hamper. Their books are of 
themselves. If the whole man is not there, the best 
of him is ; for he was under no constraint to give less 
than his best ; whereas your modern writing man must 
write to live whether the mood be on him or not. 
Every age writes its own books ; but in some ages are 
produced books for all time. 

Of such shall my winter's reading mostly be. 
Summer is the season of lightness, ease, joy, frivolity; 
but it is right and needful that during most of the year 
man should be serious and diligent ; and that the 
Saxons are a serious and strenuous people, of large 
achievement, is perhaps in no small degree due to the 
fact that their winter lasts eight months of the year. 

In this October afternoon the falling leaf, the leaden 
skies, and the smell of decay suggest the inevitable 
dismemberment and return to earth of all things 
mortal. Some among us have seen the swallows for the 
last time ; and we Bohemian folks who write and sing 
about nature, and translate her sounds and reflect her 
moods in music and painted pictures — we who love 
the fair earth so much 

cannot ease the burden of your fears, 

Or make quick-coming death a little thing, 

Or bring again the pleasure of past years, 
Nor for our words shall ye forget your tears. 

But after all, most of us will often again see the 
brown October, with its ruddy sun, its flying clouds, 
and its stooked corn in the bare but not unpleasant 
fields ; and if its influences are sobering, it is good 
that we should pass from the flightiness of summer 
through a brief period of gentle melancholy in pre- 
paration for the stern realities of a winter's life and 
work in the city. During the dark days that are 
approaching, when the earth will lie torn and scarified 
beneath the fury of the Storm King, the pulse of 
human life in all its phases will beat fast and strong. 
In every department of social service our activity will 
be quickened. Apart from the ordinary work-day 
duties of bread winning, there are words to "speak for 
the fallen and the weak," and practical aid and comfort 
to give them as well ; we have to make it hot for 
sinners in high places ; to help hoary abuses to their 
grave, along with the "old opinions" which are their 



bulwark ; to " stand up for the stupid and the crazy ; " 
to "dismiss whatever insults our own soul," or seems 
likely to vex the souls of others. If we are diligent at 
something of all this according to our powers — then 
when the night and the storm come down upon us, and 
we face "the last parting pang," we shall not be with- 
out good friends about us and peace and satisfaction 
within us. 

J. L. 





HERE^THERE 


hk\znvf/} 




V- 







Our Christmas goods are now arriving daily — new 
books, new booklets, purses, pocket books, books 
nicely bound in leather for presentation, and various 
sorts of fancy articles — the consequence is that we are 
getting crowded for room. In order to clear some 
shelves we have laid out several hundred volumes, 
some second hand, some only shopworn, and have 
reduced the prices almost to vanishing point, so that 
they are bound to go. 



The books range over a considerable variety of 
subjects, from Theology — Catholic, Episcopal, and 
Presbyterian — to realistic Fiction. There are Guides 
to Heaven and Guides to the Stock Exchange, 
Tennyson's Poems, and Street Ballads, The Young Man 
in the Battle of Life, and The Adventures of Gil Bias, 
History, Biography, Travels, and Adventure being all 
represented. 



We have seen some pretty old jokes appear from 
time to time in the pages of our esteemed contempor- 
ary, Punch. But a fortnight ago they surpassed 
themselves by retailing the following : — Customer — 
" Have you a copy of Browning?" Bookseller — "No, 
I wonder at any one wanting Browning, I can't under- 
stand him at all." Customer — "Have you Praed?" 
Bookseller — "Yes, I've prayed, but it was no use." 
Customer — "I mean have you a copy of Praed's 
poems. " 



After a chestnut like that, the following is refresh- 
ing: — Dr. Muir, who was once kirking the corporation, 
said in his prayer, "Lord, have mercy upon the Magi- 
strates of Glasgow, such as they are. Make them 
wiser and better." When the Town Clerk called to 
say that the Magistrates were much aggrieved at being 
prayed for in such a fashion, the answer was instant — 



1 54 Brown's Book- Stall. 



" Great are the uses of advertising*." 

gTmitchell moir, 

clXdX Music feller, KoXs 

f0^L0fA Has a most Choice Selection of 

American Organs 
and Pianos. 
82 "CUtton Street Hberoeen. 

FOR PARTICULARS OF OUR 

Qrcat Clearing ffiale 

SEE THE DAILY PAPERS. 




^MUES HMTOX & CO., 

Jewellers, Watchmakers, and Opticians, 

235 Brompton Road, London, 

74 Princes Street, Edinburgh, and 

53 S|1I0|1 gTREET, SBERDEEJi. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



55 



"Dr Muir's compliments to the Lord Provost, and he 
is very sorry to find that his prayer has not been 
answered." 



Phonography seems to be making rapid strides in 
Aberdeen. We now have a monthly magazine printed 
in shorthand, and having, we believe, a very good 
circulation. It certainly deserves well. The Articles 
hitherto have been interesting, and they promise well 
for next month. There will be a continuation of the 
Rev. J. M. Danson's papers, an article on shorthand 
in Aberdeen forty years ago by Mr. A. S. Cook, written 
in the reporting style of that period, and other articles 
of interest to phonographers. 



Phonography has however its drawbacks. On one 
occasion an orator quoted in the course of his speech 
"Amicus Plato, amicus Cicero, sed major verite," 
which duly appeared next morning in the report as 
follows: — "I may cuss Plato, I may cuss Cicero,' 
said Major Verity. We may remark right here, as 
the Yankees would say, that we keep stock of Pitman's 
Shorthand Books — The Teacher, The Manual, The 
Reporter's Assistant, The Bible, The Dictionary, Tom 
Brown's Schooldays, Gulliver's Travels, Technical 
Reporting, etc., etc. 

We also have copies of the " New System of Short- 
hand" by Wm, Hay, late of Tillydesk, cash i/i^. 
This new and improved system by a local man ought 
to be taken up by Aberdonians. 



"Yes," said a society lady the other night at a 
swell West End affair, " I have crossed the ocean 
eleven times." The smart young man adjusted his 
eyeglass and said: "Ah! Born abroad?" "No, 
indeed. Why do you ask?" " Because if you were 
born in this country and crossed the ocean eleven 
times you would now be on the other side, dontcher- 
know." The lady figured a moment on the tips of 
her pretty fingers, blushed, and fled. 



Woman in her "Book Chat," says: — "I am very 
much in love with the 'Pocket Novel' series published 
by Messrs. Oliphant, Anderson, and Ferrier. They 
are altogether neat and charming. I have two on my 
desk at this minute, and have perused them to my 
inward satisfaction. The volumes are delightful to 
hold, and make an 'arm-chair read' a thing of comfort 
instead of a fatigue of weary wrists." This shows that 
our contemporary, Woman, is a very sensible woman 
indeed. 



The following four volumes are now published in 
the Pocket Novel Series : — "A Bachelor in search of 
a Wife," by Annie Swan; "Wyhola," by Evelyn 
Everett-Green; "Eleanor's Discipline," by Janet 
Brown; "John Gentleman, Tramp," by J. A. Norguay 
Forbes. The price is 9d. per vol. cash. 



We have just got a cheap edition of "Anna 
Karenina," which is by far the most popular of Tolstoi's 
books. It makes a thick volume of 769 pages for 2/8 
cash. It also contains 10 illustrations by Paul 
Frenzeny. 



Who is "A.M.," the Author of "From Australia 
and Japan " ? Under this title he publishes half-a-dozen 
short stories, written in a racy style, with perhaps a 
suspicion of Kiplingese about it. In the second tale, 
"The Wooing of Webster," he gives the following 
description of the announcement of the result of the 
Bursary Competition at King's. "On the afternoon 
of that day the quad of King's College was seething 
with a roaring sea of student life. At last the Senatus 
room door swings open, and the Janitor, with a mace 
as big as himself, steps out. We have just time to 
catch a glimpse of the long file of Professorial robes 
that flutter solemnly behind him, when we are carried 
on the crest of the crush right into the hall, which 
looks like a cross 'twixt Pandemonium and Donybrook 
Fair. Meanwhile the Faculty has filed on to the 
platform by a side door, and the Principal sits him 
down in his chair of state, in all the dignity of robes 
of office and (wonder of wonders), for once in his life, 
of clean linen. Gradually the uproar subsides, and 
the Principal slowly upends himself, clears his throat 
and begins: — 'Gentlemen! (tremendous cheers) you 
will now learn (a voice, 'The hundred and nineteenth 
psalm') the result of the competition for Bursaries just 
held. And I hope you will behave yourselves, for 
this uproar is perfectly disgraceful ! ' The Secretary 
of the Senatus opens a roll of papers, coughs, and 
then, in mellifluous accents, takes up his parable : — 
'The first Bursary to be disposed of is a Simpson 
Bursary of ^35 in annual value, and has been awarded 
to the first in the order of merit, Francis Webster.'" 
Notwithstanding this success, however, Webster was 
not successful in his wooing, and the fair one married 
"Rogers of the Town and County Bank." 

The peculiarity of every editor, in the opinion of 
his readers, is that he does not understand his business. 
It is a well-known fact in the editorial world, that 
every one who peruses a paper imagines he could do 
the editing much better himself. 



i5« 



Brown's Book-Stall. 




SCRAP BOOKS 

3E11 Kane? ;©in&inga, 
Sixpence and One Shilling* upwards, 

OR IN 

RMain Btn&inge, 

as shown in Cut, 

with Paper op Cardboard 
Leaves, 

1/6, 2/, 4/, and 7/6. 




MARLON & C° 



A. Brown & Co., 

77 UNION STREET, 



JAMES STEPHEN I SONS, 

GAl^VE^S, ©IDDE^S, 
(Dipuoi? and Picture feame (Banufocfupeps, 

Fine Art Publishers, Artists' Golormen, h, 

48, 49, & 50 WOOLMANHILL, 
<^X ABERDEEN K^X, 

(Opposite Entrance Gate to Royal Infirmary.) 



WORKS: RODGER'S WALK, JOHN STREET. 

Telephone No. 553. 



Mirror Frames pe-gilt ; Old Frames pe-gilt ; FVervj Description of 

Qildirvg Work dorve. 



I?or 

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33 and 35 Union Street, Aberdeen. 

Established 1870. 

Gordon & Watt, 

Decorative painters & Qlass ^tainers. 

^^ {T^T iainecl ancl Opnamenial Calais Iaea3.e:3. Wopk fop Ecclesiastical op 
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PAINTED POTTERY AND OTHER WARE FIRED. 

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A. S. COOK, 

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DIRECTLY OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 



5 per cent. 

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WOOL 
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Made to Measure 
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DRESS SHIRTS 

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Letter and Telegram Orders receive immediate attention. 

/ Specialty.— 5 per cent. Discount for Cash. 





Published at jj Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. 



NOVEMBER. 



Telegrams — ' ' Lor imer, Bootmaker, Aberdee n." 

JamesTorimer & Son, 

Boot & Shoe Saloons, 

PALACE BUILDINGS, 

157 Union Street, Aberdeen, 

1LJAVE the Largest Stock of First-Class Goods in the North, 

including every variety of 

Boots, |5hoes, and ^lij>t>ers 

For Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 
In addition to a very large Stock of English and Continental Goods, 
J. L. & S. have constantly on hand an extensive selection of their Own 
Manufacture, which is now so well known, including the Best Styles of 
Shootii\(,. Walking, and Dress Boots and Shoes. 

Special ^cfcers of Ev>er>2 Description flftade to flDeasuce. 



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SHOOTING BOOTS. 
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5 PER CENT. DISCOUNT FOR CASH PAYMENTS. 




Ranks First 

in Every Way. 



BY SPECIAL WARRANT MAKERS TO H.M. THE QUEEN. 
CONTRACTORS TO H.M. GOVERNMENT. 



The Type-Writer Company, Ltd., 

2 2« Renfield Street, Glasgow. 



P. M. DURWARD, Manager. 



Aberdeen Agents— A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street. 

Dy Special Appointment < Patronised by 

Ro yal China Saloo ns 

To The Queen. s *Q}£z&&sA%y H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 





John Ford & Co., 

©lass and China (TWchanfs, 

136 & 138 Union Street, 

/\lse at 39 prinees jgtreet, and kjelyreed Qlass Vt/enks, 
*X5X EB + ^IbU^^H XcS. 




No. IT. 



NOVEMBER. 



Brown's Hberfceen Boofc*5tall. 



No. XI. 




ND now having freely wandered 
at our own sweet will on the 
banks of the "Book-Stall" stream- 
let, whose course we have been 
endeavouring to explore and set 
down, noting the character of the country in 
which it ran, picking up some of the native 
plants which grew on its banks, and giving 
slight descriptions of some inhabitants of the 
district, whose wants the stream supplied, and 
whose thirst for knowledge it helped to 
assuage, — we return to note briefly its course, 
its continued growth, some of the obstacles 
it encountered, and the amalgamations which 
certainly swelled its size, but did not materi- 
ally increase its power. 

When Mr. Brown entered the Town Council 
in 181 2, its ordinary work was limited as com- 
pared with the present. Although a Council 
in name, it was not at all like the council of 
the present day, but more like a regiment of 
soldiers kept well under command, and 
Their's not to make reply, 
Their's not to question why — 
all that the rank and file had to do was to 
sanction the measures submitted to them by 
the select committee, who acted as their 
commanders ; for objectors got short shrift 
and a speedy dismissal if they did not. 

As a magistrate he had at once to take his 
share in the Baillie Court at its weekly meet- 
ing on Saturday, to clear off the week's 
quarrels. The treatment of "drunks and dis- 



orderlies" was mainly left to the tender mercies 
of the town's officers, being hardly recognised 
as a criminal offence unless accompanied 
with violence. 

But by his office Mr. Brown got immedi- 
ately behind the scenes, and to a methodical 
man of good business habits, and accustomed 
to see the balance on the right side of his 
accounts, the prospect of the monetary affairs 
revealed to him must have appeared onerous 
and responsible, but not altogether surprising. 
The town's financial difficulties had begun to 
be talked about, and from his position of 
Distributor of Stamps he must have had a 
shrewd suspicion that already in the Town 
House, paper money was becoming far more 
plentiful than solid cash. 

The consultations with his brother magis- 
trates on this subject were so frequent, that 
he soon found there was imminent danger of 
his own business suffering by his frequent 
absence. Certain trades and manufactures 
may be successfully carried on without much 
supervision by the principal, provided his 
assistants are competent to manage the mere 
mechanical working. But his business as a 
publisher and bookseller was not mechanical, 
but peculiarly demanded professional know- 
ledge and advice in many cases — which none 
but the principal could give, and without 
which his clients would not be satisfied. 

His son, William, had received an excellent 
education, and was sharp and intelligent, but 
he was then only eighteen years of age, and 
was still only in the second year of his 
apprenticeship and could not be expected to 
take his father's place. 



i 4 2 Brown's Book-Stall. 






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Brown's Book-Stall. 



i59 



David Wyllie, the head assistant, had then 
been twenty-three years in his service, and 
was an excellent book-keeper, to which depart- 
ment he had been almost exclusively kept, 
having a special faculty for accountantship, 
and a gift of clear systematisation of accounts, 
which were valuable in the stamp department. 
Some of the books devised by him were 
models in this respect, and taxed the rulers 
of the time to 
produce them 
in their com- 
plicated form. 

As has been 
already stated, 
the two prin- 
cipal libraries in 
Aberdeen, Mr. 
Brown's and 
that of Mrs. 
Burnett, had 
been united, 
and placed in 
a shop on the 
west side of 
Broad Street. 
And Mr. Brown 
having purchas- 
ed Mrs. Bur- 
nett's share, the 
library was plac- 
ed in charge of 
Forbes Frost, 
with the privil- 
ege of selling 
stationery there 
on his own be- 
hoof. This 
branch of busi- 
ness he had 
sedulously cul- mr.awillia 

tivated, and it had become both large and 
lucrative. He had gradually built up a con- 
nection, which, seeing'; him only, naturally 
looked on him as the principal. 

He was connected with the Scottish Epis- 
copal Congregation, then meeting in Long- 
acre, under the charge of Bishop John 
Skinner, Roger Aitken, and William Skinner, 
who afterwards became Bishop and Primus. 
Disestablished at the Revolution as the State 




Church, the Episcopalian ministers in Aber- 
deen retained their pulpits and status as 
parish ministers until 1694, and some land- 
ward parishes refused to change for many 
years after this. It shows the state of opin- 
ion in the north, that while in the south- 
western counties the curates were speedily 
ejected from manse and kirk ; in Aberdeen- 
shire, and specially in Buchan, the curates 

long resisted 
their ejection, 
and as at Old 
Deer in 171 1, 
actually beat off 
a force from 
Aberdeen, who 
attempted to 
assist the Pres- 
bytery of Deer 
to induct a 
parish minister 
there. 

In the re- 
bellion of 1 7 15, 
the devotion of 
the Episcopal- 
ians to the doc- 
trine of the div- 
inerightofkings 
was manifested 
by many of their 
members taking 
part in the re- 
bellion; but one 
of the three con- 
gregations here, 
broke off; the 
ministers took 
the oaths to 
government, 
m brown. and received 

so much favour that they built for them- 
selves St. Paul's Chapel in 1 7 2 1 . In Aberdeen 
at that time the community were nearly 
equally divided as to their adherence to 
the Presbyterian or Episcopalian form of 
church government, the number of their 
places of worship being the same ; and 
some of the Incorporated Trades built for 
themselves galleries or sittings in St. Paul's. 
But so much was the adherence of this 



i6o 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Youths' Ulsters, with Gapes (Fit Youth 9 to 16 years), 
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Youths' Scarbro' Coats, ... 13/6, 17/6, to 25/- 

Youths' Overcoats, ... ... 13/6,16/6,1025/- 

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Men's Overcoats, in Miltons and Black and Fancy 

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PRICES- 

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Larger Seal of better quality, 1/- 



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Skin Dressing. 



EVERY description of Home and 
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dffjWffi/ *~ ' Foreign Skins carefully prepared 

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<lwilrMth^ Deer Skins Dressed and Manufactured 

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A lexander Laing, 

Roger s Walk, John Street, Aberdeen 




To be had of all Stationers. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



161 



congregation to the new Hanoverian dynasty 
resented, that even down to 1839, Dr. Joseph 
Robertson in his Book of Bon-Accord, p. 329, 
can speak of them as "an odd sort of Inde- 
pendents, which is not yet extinct." 

The other two congregations adhered to 
the belief in the divine right of kings,— were 
Jacobite almost to a man, — and suffered 
for it. And during the rebellion of 1745, 
being generally supporters of the exiled 
family, they reaped, what, once as a State 
church, they helped to sow, the priceless 
privilege of persecution, which continued 
down to 1806; when having made the con- 
cession of publicly praying for the reigning 
sovereign, the persecution was relaxed. 

Yet, when these prayers were first publicly 
used in the chapel, they were entirely drowned 
by the noise of the sudden and severe attacks 
of coughing by which the members were then 
simultaneously seized ; but which, curiously, 
as suddenly ceased at the conclusion of these 
particular prayers. Some absolutely refused 
to join at all, saying, "that the Bishop might 
pray the very cknees aff his breeks afore they 
would join." 

The members of this hitherto persecuted 
church, welded together by their alienation 
from their neighbours, in their forms of wor- 
ship and in their heirarchical church govern- 
ment — so obnoxious to the young and rising 
democracy — were naturally clannish ; and 
they rallied around Mr. Frost, especially 
the wealthier ladies of the flock. And it was 
little wonder that in the spring-time of his 
days he made himself agreeable to them by 
his suaviter in modo, (although later on in 
life the fortiter in re was considered his 
predominating characteristic). For they were 
such ladies ! "well read, well bred, free yet 
refined, full of spirit and sense, yet with a 
strong organ of adhesiveness, . . . yet 
distinct in character each from the other, as 
were the men— or as is the beech from the 
birch, a lily from a rose." The race of old 
Scottish gentlewomen, who were thrifty, yet 
liberal to the poor; very freely outspoken, 



yet in the Scotch it seemed refined in senti- 
ment, who had snuff boxes in their pockets, 
and strong common sense in their heads, 
seems extinct now-a-days. 

Several of them took quite a motherly 
interest in the young bookseller, patronized 
him, made him the channel of their charities, 
and would have provided him with a partner 
had he been so inclined. Backed up by the 
ladies, who practically rule the world, Mr. 
Frost feeling secure in his position, became 
very independent, and spoke of starting in 
business on his own account. And so 
"Anderson's Poems" appearing in 1813, with 
the imprint of "J. Mortimer, & F. Frost, 
Broad Street," while as yet the latter was 
merely in Mr. Brown's service, brought 
matters to a crisis ; with the result that the 
separate shop was given up, and a partner- 
ship — to last for seven years, consisting of, 
Mr. Brown, his son William, and Forbes 
Frost— was formed in 18 14, under the title 
of A. Brown & Co., which has been now 
retained for nearly eighty years. 

Extensive additions and alterations on the 
premises at the corner of Broad Street and 
Queen Street were made, and then it became 
"the showiest shop in town," and quite 
eclipsed that of Angus & Sons, in the Narrow 
Wynd. Fine Corinthian pillars upheld the 
roof, and busts of celebrated authors ranging 
alongside that of Homer, with prints of the 
King, Dundas, and the Tory leaders decorated 
the walls. Altogether, and at the time, it was 
a fitting temple of literature, and it served 
for Aberdeen, what the shops of Allan Ram- 
say and William Creech long did for Edin- 
burgh, and is yet continued in the handsome 
saloon of W. Blackwood & Sons. The rent 
was fixed by Mr. Brown at ^100, this being 
about the highest shop rent in the city. 

But the handsome accommodation and high 
rent were warranted, for the business was exten- 
siveandprosperous,andwascarefully cultivated; 
running accounts being kept with upwards of 
sixteen hundred customers, embracing all the 
leading families in the northern counties. 



PARCEL POST BOXES, ™de of Wood > Stron g> Chea P> and Li § ht - 

Id. to 1/- each. ' A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



From 



162 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



WATERSTON'S „ 

Now 
Published. 



DIARIES for ,89 



The Best Scotch Diaries. 

At all prices, suitable for the Pocket, the Desk, the Counting-Room, 

and the Warehouse. 



SPECIALLY NOTED FOR 

Full Scotch information, complete to most 
recent date, including recent changes in 
Postal Rates, Census, Public Appointments, 
Parliamentary List, &c. 

MAY BE HAD FROM ALL BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS. 



Convenience in size. 

Novelty and neatness in binding 

Superior paper. 



GEORGE WATERSTON & SONS, 
EDINBURGH AND LONDON. 



iiShinf 



ft CLUB VELLUM 

JvJOTEfAPER ^ 

6* 



A BROWN &CO 

STATIONERS, 

77. Union Street, ABERDEEN. 



wsm^mmmmmmm 



he Point * * 

to keep in view is that you get the 
best possible value in Stationery 
and Books from A. Brown & Co., 
77 Union Street, Aberdeen, who 
keep a large and varied stock in 
both departments. 



ence 




Illustrated 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



163 



The partnership did not turn out the success 
which Mr. Brown had hoped for or antici- 
pated. Getting more and more absorbed in 
public business, Mr. Brown's energies — which 
if allowed scope, might have restored its 
ancient prestige to Aberdeen — got dissipated 
in council work, and in his earnest endeavours 
to avert the impending crisis in the financial 
conditions of the city. Besides this, he was 
now a wealthy man ; the rent from his invest- 
ments and properties, the revenue from the 
fast increasing sale of stamps, and his busi- 
ness profits seem to have satisfied him, and 
he generously gave to the citizens, who had 
made him what he was, a large portion of his 
time and all his abilities. Partnerships not 
being like marriages, made in heaven, are just 
what the partners make it afterwards, and the 
two juniors did not pull well together. The 
son and heir would naturally desire some 
deference, and the new partner, accustomed 
to independent action, would as naturally 
resent this from a younger man. Their 
relations got strained, and frequent quarrels, 
with very strong language, unpleasant to ears 
polite, on Mr. Frost's part, so embittered the 
connection, that in 1819, the question of the 
renewal of the partnership in 182 1, gave Mr. 
Brown much thought, and this along with his 
being a city creditor, kept him out of office 
that year, much to the disappointment of his 
associates, who accepted his son William for 
the time as Master of Mortifications. Some 
re-arrangement as to duties being agreed to, 
the business partnership was renewed in 1820, 
and was actually continued up to 1845, when 
Mr. Frost died. Mr. William Brown took 
charge of the Stamp Department, which from 
being a mere adjunct to the business, had 
then become as important as the business 
itself, and to which department he was 
officially appointed as Stamp Distributor in 
1 83 1 ; and Mr. Brown devoting himself to 
public affairs, gradually left the bookselling 



business under the sole management of Mr. 
Frost. How it was conducted by him, with 
notices of the customers of the firm, of the 
booksellers of the time, and the events of the 
period, have all been duly noted down, but it 
depends on the editor of the "Book-Stall," 
and the patient indulgence of its readers, 
whether these notes be printed or not. 

Meantime we conclude by narrating that in 
1828, a very young school-boy, who had re- 
ceived a whole white shilling as a Christmas 
present, and was the sole, individual, proud 
proprietor of it, with ad libitum power to spend 
it as he chose, entered the "Book-Stall" at the 
corner of Broad Street and Queen Street, and 
demanded in an imperious way from a stately 
looking person — who, the boy thought from 
his manner, must also have been his own 
equal in riches — the sight of some picture 
books — for the boy loved art as well as litera- 
ture. The considerate Mr. Frost seeing the 
small size, and youthful appearance of the 
sucking book-worm, was very gracious, and 
spread upon the counter such an array of 
beautiful books, that the boy was fairly dazzled, 
having no conception that there were so many 
beautiful books in the whole world. Then 
and there, with the revelation of such an El 
Dorado before him, that boy's lot in life was 
determined on — so far as he could choose — 
he would be a bookseller, and revel ever after 
in the "Garden of Hesperides," then opened 
out to his admiring gaze. That old boy still 
marvels at the patience of the stately gentle- 
man, who, retiring to his desk, allowed him 
such a long and deliberate choice. But his 
patience was rewarded, for after looking with 
gloating eyes over the whole collection, (worth 
one shilling in itself), the money changed 
hands, and the boy went out prouder than 
when he entered, as the possessor of— now, 
what do you think ? It was neither "Jack 
the Giant Killer," nor "Puss in Boots," nor 
any of those charming stories which are so 

{Continued on page 169). 




This is a CAPITAL PENHOLDER, price Id. 



164 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



"Let your goods be known of all men. 



Some flem Books. fffgPfp 



Annie S. Swan's Latest Book. 
ZTbe (Butnea Stamp : a Tale of Modem 

Glasgow. By Annie S. Swan. Large 
^ /— Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 5/. Uniform with 
"The Gates of Eden." 

A New Authoress. 
H Woman's Worfc. By Dora m. Jones. 

31 /- Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6. With 
/ O Illustrations by Elizabeth Gulland. 



No. 4 of the Pocket Novel Series. 
3obn 

1/6 



5obn Gentleman, Uramp. By j. a. 

Norquay Forbes (Hermione), Author of 
" The Story of Tatters." New Shape. 
Pocket 8vo. With Frontispiece by W. II. 
Margetson. Artistic Paper Cover, 1/- ; 
Cloth 1/6. 



I/" 



A Choice Booklet. 



Hwafeincis, or BiUterfl^Cbt^saltos, 

T / By Mrs. A. R. Simpson, Author of 

X/ "Visions," &c. Imperial 241110, cloth, 

and gilt edges, 1/- ; Gold Embossed Paper 

(yd. Cover ' 6cl 

The Jubilee of the Free Church. 
H Jubilee Stors tor tbe Konno. By 

the Rev. James Wells, M.A. Small 4to, 
T/V Paper Cover. With 9 Illustrations, id. 

8/4 per 100, net. 



Complete Catalogues post free on application to 

Oliphant, Anderson, & peppier, 

EDINBURGH AND LONDON. 



H H'.y fl itiH 



PRICES. 




R 



To be had of all 
ABERDEEN STATIONERS. 

easonable Prices and Good Work 



W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers. 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberfceen. 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries.' 




Bibles, 



GOOD VARIETY at 

Brown's, • • 

77 UNION STREET 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



165 



ALL SORTS of 

Reading Lamps, 

Drawing Room 
Lamps, 

Hall Lamps, 

Outside Lamps, 

and 

Lamps 

of Every Description 



SCOTT CHALMERS, 

general and jf urnishing ironmonger, 



MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF 



IiflpPS 



AND 

BRASS-WORK 
FURNISHINGS. 



88 Union Street, 
&bexbecn. 



\^m%\ pwi puw! 

TUCK PURSES, in Morocco, 

ONE SHILLING to SIX SHILLINGS. 




BAND PURSES, 

ONE SHILLING upwards. 



BAG PURSES, 

IN MOROCCO, 

From SIXPENCE. 




A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



1 66 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Teachers Bibles 

OXFORD &> LONDON EDITIONS, 

In a Variety of Different Sizes and Bindings, 

From 3/6 upwards. 




The Smallest Bible in the World, from 3/6, 
The Finger New Testament, from 2/, 
The Finger Prayer-Books, from 2/, 

Are Marvels of Production, both as to Printing and Binding. 

POCKET BIBLES, from i/- to 31/6. 
PEW BIBLES, Very Large Print, 3/6, 6/, and 10/. 




Prayer Books, wm f.Zm., 



In One Volume, or Two Volumes in Case. 



Prayer Books, 

With Scotch Communion Office, 

1/, 1/3, 1/6, 2/6, & 3/6. 



A. BROJVN & CO., 

J J Union Street, Aberdeen. 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



67 



ALBUMS Kek, 



^sX 



In a Variety of Styles, to hold Mixed Sizes or 
Cabinets only, and in the Newest Shapes. 




The "Highland Life" Album, 

dedicated to the c Duke and ^Duchess of c Fife. 
PRICE FROM 2l/- UPWARDS. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC SCREENS, 

LEATHER CASES to hold Cabinet Photographs, 2/6 each 



ALBUMS — Special Line at 10/6. 

The Album we are at present selling at 10/6 is Special Value, and would be cheap at 15/. 



A. BROWN & CO., 



J 7 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



i68 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



BLACKIE & SON'S 

NEW ILLUSTRATED STORY B OOKS. 

By Gk J±. HBITTY. 

BERIC THE BRITON : A Tale of the Roman Invasion. By G. A. Henty. With 12 page Illustra- 
tions by W. Parkinson. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s. 

IN GREEK WATERS : A Tale of the Grecian War of Independence (1821-1827). By G. A. Henty. 
With 12 page Illustrations by W. S. Stacey. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s. 

CONDEMNED AS A NIHILIST: A Tale of Escape from Siberia. By G. A. Henty. With 8 
page Illustrations by Walter Paget. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, $s. 



THE THIRSTY SWORD: A Story of the Norse Invasion of Scotland (1262-1263). By Robert 

Leighton, Author of "The Pilots of Pomona," &c. With 8 page Illustrations by Alfred Pearse, 

and a Map. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, $s. 
THE HEIRESS OF COURTLEROY. By Anne Beale, Author of "Queen of the May," &c. 

With 8 page Illustrations by T. C. H. Castle. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, $s. 
A VERY ODD GIRL : or, Life at the Gabled Farm. By Annie E. Armstrong, Author of "Three 

Bright Girls," &c. With 6 page Illustrations by S. T. Dadd. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3.5-. 6d. 
THE CAPTURED CRUISER : or, Two Years from Land. By C. J. Hyne, Author of " Stimson's 

Reef," &c. With 6 page Illustrations by F. Brangwyn. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, y. 6d. 
AN OLD-TIME YARN : Wherein is set forth Divers Desperate Mischances which befell Anthony 

Ingram and his Shipmates in the West Indies and Mexico with Hawkins and Drake. By Edgar 

Pickering, Author of "Silas Verney," &c. Illustrated with 6 page Pictures Drawn by Alfred 

Pearse. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d. 



BLACKIE'S THREE-SHILLING SERIES. 

Beautifully Illustrated and Handsomely Bound. 



Patience Wins : or, War in the Works. By G. 
Manville Fenn. With 6 page Illustrations. 
New Edition. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 

Mother Carey's Chicken : Her Voyage to the 
Unknown Isle. By G. Manville Fenn. With 
6 page Illustrations by A. Forestier. New 
Edition, Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 

The Missing Merchantman. By Harry Colling- 
vvood. With 6 page Illustrations by W. H. Over- 
end. New Edition. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 



BLACKIE'S HALF-CROWN SERIES. 

Illustrated by Eminent Artists. Cloth elegant. 

A Rough Road : or, How the Boy made a Man of 

Himself. By Mrs. G. Linn/eus Banks. Crown 

8vo, 2/6. 
Penelope and the Others : A Story of Five Country 

Children. By Amy Walton. Crown 8vo, 2/6. 
A Cruise in Cloudland. By Henry Frith. 

Crown 8vo, 2/6. 
The Two Dorothys : A Tale for Girls. By Mrs. 

Herbert Martin. Crown 8vo, 2/6. 

Also NEW BOOKS at 2s., is. 6d., is., and gd. 



BLACKIE & SON'S NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, with full-page Pictures 
beautifully printed on plate-paper, will be sent Post Free on application. 



London: BLACKIE & SON, Limited, 

EDINBURGH, GLASGOW, & DUBLIN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



169 



well fitted to stir the imagination when it 
should be stirred, and which form the seed- 
bed of "penny dreadfuls," "shilling shockers," 
or Mrs. Radcliff's Romances. No, no, it was 
a mixture of truth and imagination, of reality 
and fancy, startling yet quite credible, with 
unlimited danger, and yet such a happy 
deliverance from the surrounding perils, that 
it fixed down in the boy's mind a cri- 
terion of excellence in all books read ever 
after. It was an account of "The Great 
Serpent of Anaconda," with brilliantly col- 
oured plates. The story burned itself into 
the boy's mind, and 
so, when many years had 
rolled on, he at last met 
with one solitary individ- 
ual who knew the little 
book and had been equ- 
ally impressed by it, how 
his heart warmed in 
meeting with a fellow- 
traveller in the old en- 
chanting regions of the 
far off youthful time ! 

Little did Mr. Frost 
or the boy know then the 
after relations which 
should subsist between 
them— that of master and 
apprentice, friend and 
correspondent, partner in 
the firm, and successor 
of the stately gentleman. 
Andyetsoitcametopass. 
Involuntarily there rises 
to the mind the old rhmye : 

O little did my mither ken 

That day she cradled me, 
What countries I should Reduced 

travel in, 

Or what death I should dee ! 



Founding of the New Bridge of Don, 
3rd May 1827, by Provost Brown. 



I 




N the course of the ceremony, Clerk Carnegie 
read a translation of the latin inscription of the 
brass plate inserted in the cavity of the found- 
ation stone, as follows: — "By the blessing of God, the 
best and greatest, in the sixth year of the reign of 
George the Fourth, the father of his country, an Act of 
the British Parliament having been passed while Gavin 
Hadden, Esquire, was Provost for the second time, 
after a period of two years, this bridge, an object very 
much desired, was begun 
to be built, the whole ex- 
pense being supplied from 
an annual fund, little exceed- 
ing two pounds sterling, 
given and bequeathed, a.d. 
1605, by Sir Alexander Hay, 
Baronet, Clerk of the Scot- 
tish Parliament and Council ; 
for the purpose of repairing 
the neighbouring bridge, 
built in a most pleasant situ- 
ation, by authority of Robert 
the Bruce, the ever invincible 
King of Scotland, which fund 
was successfully accumulated 
by the strictest fidelity of the 
Magistrates of Aberdeen and 
the Town Council ; Alexander 
Brown, Esquire, Provost of 
Aberdeen for the second 
time, laid the first stone of 
it on the 3rd day of May, 
1827, in presence of the 
Magistrates and Council.'" 
An old rhyme ran thus : — 

For twenty lang years in oor 

braif toon, 
Its affairs were maistly ruled 

by A. Broon ; 
Or ane o' the Haddens wore 

the croon, 
And when Gavin gaed up, 

then Jamie cam' doon. 



ustration from " Beric the Briton. 
(See page opposite). 



IN THE WANT COLUMN. 

"I want to be an angel, J ' 
The dear girl sang. All eyes 
Turned on the worldly wretch who said : 
"Then why not advertise?" 

N. Y. Herald. 



SIR THOMAS OVERBURY ON BOOKS. 



Books are a part of man's prerogative. 

In formal ink thy thoughts and voices hold, 
That we to them our solitude may give, 
And make time present travel that of old. 
Our life, Fame pierceth at the end, 
And Books if farther backward do extend. 



i 7 o Brown's Book-Stall. 



Stone's Gard Gatalogae Cabinet 

Invaluable to Librarians, Second-Hand Booksellers, Secretaries of Clubs and 
hJ^/ Societies, Registration Agents, and all others who require a Perfect Alpha- 
'1j&£ betical Catalogue, or List Of Names, &C. Additions are immediately 

recorded in their exact alphabetical order, ready for reference. 

The Cabinets are strongly made of Polished Oak or Walnut, with Ash Drawers Dovetailed. 

FIVE-DRAWER CABINET (as Illustration on opposite page), £3 2 6 

Size, outside measure, 22* inches high X 14 inches wide X 19.7 inches deep, back to front. 

CABINETS made with any Number of Drawers, 12/6 per Drawer. 

The Larger Cabinets being made proportionally stronger. 
Each Drawer will hold 1,400 Cards. 

CARDS Ruled and Punched to Pattern, 9/6penooo. 

Not less than 5000 Cards, 8/6 „ 

SPECIAL QUOTATIONS FOR LARGE QUANTITIES. 




SOLE AGENTS FOR ABERDEEN— 

A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street. 



amp $hade£, Lamp Veil?, Candle j&iade?. 

A MOST EXTENSIVE STOCK. NEW AND EFFECTIVE DESIGNS. 

bamboo JScamp jg5tant>s, ^ebestals, fables, ant> 
ipea anb @fafte jg^tan&e. 

Evening Fans* — Vepg Elegant Patten;*, 

G6L1I1IB % WMhBR, Kex, 

^^X 123 UNION STREET. 

TELEPHONE No. 579. 

CJ - _ Complete Range from CHESS and DRAUGHTS to the Popular 

M dtIH^S« SHILLING SERIES now in Stock. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



171 




Y the kind permission of the publishers of 
Black and White, we are able to give this 
month an illustration — see page 173 — 
which we think singularly in keeping with the 
character of Brozon's Book-Stall. 




Attempting as we do, to combine the advantages of 
advertising with the amenities of literature, it gives 
us considerable satisfaction to present our readers with 
this example of advertising. It is another testimony 
to the ability of William Caxton, the first English 
printer, that he, thus early, realised the importance of 
well printed advertisements. 



This sample of Caxton's printing is preserved, along 
with a good many books printed by him, in the 
famous Althorp Library, recently sold for ,£225,000. 



One of the chief features of the Althorp Library 
was the excellence of its catalogue. To secure this 
excellence in so extensive a collection of books, great 
care was necessary ; and the means adopted were the 
best that experience could suggest. Each book had 



its title written upon a card, and the cards alphabet- 
ically arranged in a cabinet of drawers. This method 
can be applied to collections of any sort. Books, 
Coins, Geological Specimens, Curios, Natural His- 
tory Objects, etc., may all be catalogued in the same 
way, and in the case of small collections, several 
separate catalogues may be kept in one cabinet. We 
show the style of cabinet in the illustration annexed, 
and full particulars of price, etc., will be found on the 
opposite page. A cabinet with samples of the style 
of cards used, may be seen at yy Uuion Street. 



Tennyson's last book, " OEnone," published last 
week, may have a good sale owing to the interest 
attaching to it as his last work, or perhaps on account 
of its quality, but it certainly will not be on account 
of the quantity. One hundred and five pages for 6/- 
is pretty stiff. 



Mr. Barry Pain is going to publish a volume of 
short stories under the title of " Playthings and 
Parodies." Judging by his previous work, this ought 
to be worth reading. These are very smart and amus- 
ing notes on current subjects which he contributes 
weekly to Black and White in the form of con- 
versations " In the Smoking Room." 




We have heard of a man though not witty himself 
being the cause of wit in others. This month, though 
not profane ourselves, we have been the cause of pro- 
fanity in others. The great first cause of this was the 
printing of our cover, which, as will be seen, is done 
with three colours of ink, the blending of 
which gives five different colour effects. 
This was accomplished at one printing, on 
an ordinary cylinder machine. We were 
grieved to hear that the remarks in the 
machine-room in connection with our rain- 
bow efforts were "painful, and frequent, 
and free." They would, we believe, have 
excited the admiration of Mark Twain, 
who, in one of his books, gives a graphic 
description of the conversation of the mate 
of a Mississippi steam-boat. 



"The Printer" now telleth a story— Once 
upon a time there came to an old-fashioned 
country inn in the westmost nook of our 
county, a dainty southern traveller. He 
required no end of attention, and finished 
by demanding a detailed bill. After the 
ink was found, the pen was still lost, but 
at last the bill was presented. "Ho, ho I" 



172 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



TRY. 



Littlejokr\ & SorVs 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 

G. MITCHELL MOIR, 

eXsX Music feller, KeX^, 

Has a most Choice Selection of 

American Organs 
and Pianos. 
82 {Union Street Hberbeen. 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



173 






*r 



'A 



•V-. 



ft 1 // ( /\ 



* 



the structure and hab- 
its of West of Ireland 
crofter society." 



The edition de luxe 
of "Johnny Gibb," 
which, as book -lovers 
know, is one of the 
most characteristic 
Scotch books — both 
as regards literature 
and art— that exists, 
is about to have a 
worthy successor in 
the illustrated edition 
of "A Window in 
Thrums " about to be 
issued. 



Advertisement issued by William Caxton, the first English printer. 



said the visitor, "what's this? F-A-S-H — two and 
sixpence. I got no fash." "I ken that brawly," said 
his host, "but ye've gi 'en plenty." And the Editor 
will find the pointed moral of this true tale in the 
next "leetle bill" presented by "The Printer." 



The Oxford of the North has broken out in a fresh 
place. There is yet another magazine in the field. 
This time it is The Cherryvale Magazine that comes 
forward as an independent candidate for public favour. 
Its independence is refreshingly shown almost in the 
first sentence, thus : — "We come to please ourselves. 
We do not fear a small circulation, nor a lack of 
appreciation." It winds up with the following notice 
to its readers : — "The magazine will not be on sale at 
the principal booksellers or the railway book-stalls, 
but parties anxious for a copy will be supplied on 
application to the publisher. Those who think there 
is not enough reading in one copy, can have two at the 
same price as one." 



We believe that our youngest contemporary is pub- 
lished for the education and amusement of a circle of 
juvenile readers. 



We have now got a supply of the cheap edition of 
"Grania," an Irish novel which created no small 
sensation when it first appeared. The Times says of 
it : — "Certainly the most artistic and dramatic of the 
studies of Irish life and character which we owe to the 
pen of the Hon. Emily Lawless. We congratulate 
Miss Lawless on her fascinating tale — a tale at once 
intensely picturesque and dramatic, and one which 
throws more light than a bushel of Blue-books upon 



It will, we believe, be similar in style to "Johnny 
Gibb," and will be illustrated by 18 beautiful etchings 
by W. B. Hole, R.S.A. The edition is small and 
limited, and as a considerable proportion is going to 
America, bookmen who wish a copy would do well to 
order early. The price is 31/6 net. We will have 
copies as soon as it is out, but we don't expect to have 
them long. 



Mr. G. A. Henty may fairly claim to be the 
champion provider of good stories for boys. His 
books are always interesting, always instructive, and 
they seem to be 
without limit. He 
comes to the front 
this season with 3 
new ones — " Beric 
the Briton," a Tale 
of the Roman Invas- 
ion of Britain ; " In 
Greek Waters," a 
Tale of the Grecian 
War of Independ- 
ence (1821-27), and 
" Condemned as a 
Nihilist." The first 
two are 4/6 cash, and 
the last 3/9. From 
the first we give on 
page 169 a specimen 
of the illustrations, 
with which they are 
freely embellished. 




174 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



" Great are the uses of advertising^ 



FOR PARTICULARS OF OUR 

Great Clear ing ffiale 

SEE THE DAILY PAPERS. 



0M&ES Y\MHN & CO., 

Jewellers, Watehmakers, and Optieians, 

235 Brompton Road, London, 

74 Princes Street, Edinburgh, and 

53 a|U0]l gTHEET, SBEHDEEJi. 



John Heaths Pens 




(Jl JOHN HEATH'S 
-4 \'J CLASS F 

"OFFICIAL PEN F.M.B?/, 



F. M. B., 2/6 

Sample Box (24 kinds) and List, 7 stamps, BIRMINGHAM. 



If you want to 

Sign a Trust Deed or make your Will, 

Get a Form from A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 
TRUST DEED FORMS, 6d. ; WILL FORMS, 3d., 4<L, 6d. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



75 



Among the new books just in, is "A Woman's 
Word," which comes from the pen of a new writer, 
Dora M. Jones — a very good story, very pleasantly 
told. It is a capital book for girls. 



We give an illustration this month from " Wyhola 
one of the Pocket 
Novel Series which 
we referred to in last 
month's number. If 
all the series are as 
good as "Wyhola," 
they should be widely 
read. 



Our never-failing friend, Annie S. Swan, has again 
come to the front with a new book for Christmas. 
This brings us a considerable amount of comfort in 
these dull times, because we are sure of at least one 
book that will sell well. "The Guinea Stamp" is a 
Glasgow story,"and is uniform in style and price with 

" The Gates of Eden." 
We have not yet read 
it, but if it is as good 
as its prototype, it 
will be well worth the 
3/9 of ready money 
for which it sells. 



There has just been 
published a new edi- 
tion of the "Tales of 
the Borders." These 
tales seem ever fresh 
and new. Their vitality 
seems as great as 
that of the Waverley 
Novels. The present 
volume contains 539 
closely, but clearly, 
printed pages, and 
makes a handsome 
8vo book, while the 
price is but 2/8 cash. 




English as she is 
Translated. 

Victor Hugo is re- 
sponsible for translat- 
ing "The Firth of 
Forth" le cinquihne 
de quatrieme; and a 
"pea-jacket" as a 
paletot a la puree de 
pois. So also Colley 
Cibber 'splay, "Love's 
Last Shift," was rend- 
ered into French 
under the title of La 
dernier e Chemise de 
V Amour; and Con- 
greve's "Mourning Bride" as VEpouse du Matin. 



After you get home 
at night and settle 
down at the fire with 
your slippers on, you 
may easily get your 
mind off the troubles 
and worries of the day 
by taking up a vol- 
ume of the humorous 
series just published 
by Walter Scott. 
Two of the volumes 
are now ready, "The 
Humour of France," 
and "The Humour 
of Germany." The 
price — 2/8 cash — is 
little enough to pay 
for the amount of 
pleasure to be deriv- 
ed from the perusal. 
The pictures are dott- 
ed over the book like 
stars upon the sky, 
and are alone worth 
the money. 



ustration from "Wyhola." 



We are still clearing 
out a lot of our "shop- 
keepers" cheap, to 
make room for new 
goods. Come early 
and get the bargains. 



We have for sale a Hand Camera, second hand. 
It may be seen, and samples of the work done with it, 
at 77 Union Street. 



Did we mention before that Mr. Henry Irving wrote 
us from the Lyceum Theatre the other day, stating that 
our Bon-Accord Pen was excellent ? Sample boxes 
6d. each, post free 7 stamps. 



176 Brown's Book-Stall. 







Cabinet /Iftafcers ano "(Upholsterers, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shorn Rooms at -^^ 

^tn^ 257 UjlIOfl STREET, 

and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and Wkpholstery Goods. 



Qbe Cabinet ^furniture made in their own workshop win 

be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



Zbcix flew Carpet Saloon is stocked witb ! the , f 

best makes of 

British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums y 
Mattings, Rtigs, &c. y 
Mr Curtains and Upholstery Materials, 



IbOlbUtll Cabinet WOVkSare now the Largest in the North 
of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



Cash Boxes, 




2/, 3/6, 4/6, and 5/6. 

STRONG AND WELL FINISHED. 



A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Established 1870. 




Gordon & Watt, 

©eeorative painters & Glass ^tainers. 

iainecL ancl Ornamental drlass keaciecL Wopk for? Ecclesiastical op 
Domestic Purposes ; Memorial Windows, Dwarj^ Sepeens, Doop 
Panels, &c , die, aptistieall^ ancl. effectively executed. 

ESTIMATES AND DESIGNS ON APPLICATION. 

DESIGNS entrusted to them by Architects will be carefully carried out. 

PAINTED POTTERY AND OTHER WARE FIRED. 

Jtieltcf Jlccorntibi' Jrlatcrials in Tynecastle Canvas, Lincrusta- Walton, Anaglypta, 
Japanese, and other Wall Hangings of the Best Manufacture. 

' Y\\GM-C\.kSS \N0RMKUSY\W, UNDER PtRSOUM. SUPEft\l\S\ON, &UKRKUTEEO. 



39 WOOLMANHILL I II I 25 BLflCKFRIARS STREET, 
^FX ABERDEEN. K5^ 




A. S. COOK 

Clothier and Hosier, 

46 JVIarket Street, 



Dress Suit 

£4 4/- 

5 per cent. Diset. 
for Cash. 




SPECIAL 

OVERCOAT 



IN 



MELTON OR BEAVER 

£3 3/- 

5 per cent. Disct. 
fop Cash. 



SPECIAL 



TROUSERS, 

16/6 

A PAIR. 



A.S.COOK 



BEST 
SHIRT 

IN 

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TRADE 



r B0MM0COBD^ 
SHIRT. 



DRESS 
OXFORD 
PRINT 

WOOL 



46. MARKET STREET/ABERDEEN. 

DIRECTLY OPPOSITE POST OFFICE. 



8/6 & 10/6 



Made to Measure 
or Ready-Made. 



5 per cent. 

Discount for 

Cash. 




JKeuxest IDesigns 



DRESS SHIRTS 

5/, 6/, 7/6, 8/6. 

Special Extra Wide 

Fronts for 

Evening Dress 

DRESS GLOVES, 
DRESS BOWS, 

MUFFLERS, 

SCARFS, &c, 

in Great Variety. 

WOOL 

JHOSIERY 



IN 



SUITINGS, OVERCOATINGS 
ULSTERINGS, TROUSERINGS 
VESTINGS, &c, &c, 

AT VERY MODERATE PRICES. 



PATTERNS OK APPLIC ATION. 
Letter and Telegram Orders receive immediate attention 

Specialty. — 5 per cent. Discount for Cash 





Ranks First 



in Every Way. 



BY SPECIAL WARRANT MAKERS TO H.M. THE QUEEN. 
CONTRACTORS TO H.M. GOVERNMENT. 



The Type-lVriter Company, Ltd., 

2 2« Renfield Street, Glasgow. 

P. M. DURWARD, Manager. 
Aberdeen Agents— A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street. 

By Special Appointment Patronised by 

Ro yal China Saloo ns 

To The Queen. ^&fcdgfe-*4^ H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. 





John Ford & Co., 

©lass and China (D enchants, 

136 & 138 Union Street, 

<^X KBERBEEJS. KeX, 



^Ise at 39 prinees ^treet, and r^olypeeel Gflass \X/erks, 




No. 12. 



DECEMBER. 




first number of Brown's Book-Stall, which appeared in January, 
was prefaced by the remark that, if it was satisfactory to our friends 
and ourselves, the publication would appear at regular intervals. 
That the first condition has been fulfilled is evidenced, not only 
by the very kindly reception accorded to it by the members of the 
press, but also by the demand for copies on the part of friends of 

Bon- Accord both " hereaboot and far awa." 

We may not be able, as yet, to claim that we have the largest circulation in the 

world, but it is certainly a wide one. There are few of the British Colonies that are not 

favoured with a copy, and several go to climes not blessed with a British Constitution. 
The second condition has also, to some extent, been fulfilled. " 'Tis a poor thing, 

but mine own," is the keynote to a certain amount of our satisfaction. But there are 

other and more solid reasons, for 

Those buy now who never bought before, 
And customers of old now buy the more 

Therefore we will essay to navigate our little barque through another twelve-month. 
Gratitude has been described as a keen sense of favours to come, so we take this 
opportunity of expressing our gratitude to the kind friends who have helped us along — 
some with the solid but nourishing advertisement, others with the lighter but tasty dish 
of literary matter. 




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Brown's Book-Stall. 






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To Gor\surr\ers of KeXo 

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T TSE only Pencils of ENGLISH MANUFACTURE. 
^^ They are Superior in every respect to those of Foreign make. 



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For Draughtsmen 



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They are made by Skilled Workmen. KeX^ 

oJSX Extra Value and Quality Guaranteed. 



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(El. Wolff & £on, 

m&nufaotui'ei'g to per" Majesty ^oVeifnmBnt \ the M\ of England, 

£team pencid caoi^Ks, 

Battersea, London, s.w. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



179 



Brown's Hberbeen SoofrStall. 




No. XII. 



OR some 
years after 
entering 
into the Town 
Council, and 
forming 
his part- 
nership, 

Mr. Brown must have been a busy man, and 
keeping the printers constantly at work also. 
There were new and large editions issued of 
"Campbell on the Gospels," 4 vols., 8vo, 
and his "Ecclesiastical History," in, 2 vols. ; 
besides such works as Keith's "Survey of 
Aberdeenshire," "Paterson on Witchcraft," 
"Arbuthnott's Fishes and Fuci of the Buchan 
Coast," Brown's "Burnett Prize Essay," 
"Kennedy's Annals," 2 vols., 4to, "Watt's 
Latin Grammar," "Welsh's Geography," "Mel- 
vin's Grammar," with others. And the pur- 
chase of libraries still continued, and included 
those of the Rev. John Rose of Udny, Rev. 
J. Paterson of Auldearn, Professor James 
Beattie, and Professor Ogilvie, which were all 
duly catalogued and offered for sale, the 
auctioning of books having been discontinued 
for some years. 

It was while occupying the Civic Chair in 
1822, that Mr. Brown, less from prudential 
considerations, one may reasonably suspect, 
than from a laudable and patriotic desire to 
stimulate the taking of feus, and promoting 
building in Union Street, took two-thirds of 
the ground on which Union Buildings now 
stand, at the very large feu duty of ^375 8s. 
And he completed that block — the west 
portion having been built in 1818 — in a very 
handsome manner, carrying out a design 
which gave uniformity to the whole buildings, 
and thus he led the way to the control which 
the council afterwards exercised regarding 
the frontage of the buildings erected on their 
feuing ground. 



But in order to provide a really handsome 
news-room for the citizens, the building was 
cut up in such a manner as to render it 
unprofitable as a paying investment, even 
when fully occupied by tenants. And when, 
in after years, the Union Club started a News- 
room, in what is now the Music Hall, the 
Athenaeum News-room not only did not pay 
its expenses, but it became an annual drain 
upon his resources, so serious, that in after 
years, and by legal advice, he sold the pro- 
perty, which had cost him well on to ^12,000, 
to Mr. Blake, the then news-room attendant, 

for £S- 

But although he had fulfilled the obligations 
of the feu charter, by erecting good and 
sufficient buildings, approved and sanctioned 
by the superiors, yet the Town Council de- 
clined to accept the transfer of the property, 
and fortified by a decision of the House of 
Lords, in the case of "King's College versus 
Lord James Hay," the council held him, and 
his heirs, liable for the feu duty in perpetuity. 
Such was the reward meted out to Provost 
Brown for his public spirit, his exertions to 
keep the Town Council out of its difficulties \ 
to beautify the city, and to provide for the 
citizens a splendidly equipped News-room, 
then of much more importance than it is 
even now, when there is one kept up by a 
public rate. Sheltering themselves under the 
legality of the decision, the council would 
listen to no compromise, and this embittered 
the declining days and the last years of the 
old Provost. But after his death, and in 
prospect of the rebuilding of the Town 
House, during which their possession of the 
Athenaeum buildings — in which the courts 
were held — was simply invaluable to the 
officials, they consented to relieve his heirs 
on payment of ^500; selling it afterwards 
for a good round sum. Corporations are 
said to have no consciences, nor a spark of 
gratitude — but members have — and in his 
plain, blunt, outspoken manner, with many 
expletives, and in much stronger language 
than is now in current use, Sir Alexander 
Anderson, when in office, said— that though 
he and Provost Brown had never rowed well 
together, yet his treatment by the Town 
Council was simply etc., etc. One can 



i8o 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



WATERSTON'S 



DIARIES for .8 



93- 



Now 
Published. 



The Best Scotch Diaries. 

At all prices, suitable for the Pocket, the Desk, the Counting-Room, 

and the Warehouse. 



SPECIALLY NOTED FOR 

Full Scotch information, complete to most 
recent date, including recent changes in 
Postal Rates, Census, Public Appointments, 
Parliamentary List, &c. 

MAY BE HAD FROM ALL BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS. 



Convenience in size. 

Novelty and neatness in binding. 

Superior paper. 



GEORGE WATERSTON & SONS, 
EDINBURGH AND LONDON. 




ft CLUB VELLUM 

JJOTEfAPER fiS 



A BROWN &CO 

STATIONERS, 

77. Union Street. ABERDEEN. 



^mmmmmmm 




c IPoint 



5§e *e 

to keep in view is that you get the 
best possible value in Stationery 
and Books from A. Brown & Co., 
77 Union Street, Aberdeen, who 
keep a large and varied stock in 
both departments. 



ence 




lllustt 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



imagine the terms used by the Knight who 
never minced his words, and had a copious 
vocabulary always at command. If remon- 
strated with, and told that swearing was of no 
use in the case, he would have said, that was 
just the reason why he swore. 

But if by building this property, Provost 
Brown helped in adorning Union Street, he 
was thus at the same time depreciating Broad 
Street. The current saying that every dog 
has his day, may also be applied to streets — 
they have their time and their fashion. The 
long line of Union Street was then beginning 
to be filled with houses, and every year saw 
larger houses erected, and showier shops 
opened. In the 'teens of the century the 
booksellers were huddled close together in 
two or three adjacent localities, and to its 
honour, be it said, booksellers' shops have 
always bulked largely in Aberdeen. 

Mr. Wyllie left Mr. Brown's employment 
on the formation of the partnership in 1814, 
and Columbus-like, adventurously led the way 
westwards, to what was then considered the 
outskirts of the town — No. 43 Union Street, 
next to Crown Court ! ! becoming then an 
almost isolated pioneer of literature, in a 
comparatively desert place, for he was actually 
more than a stone-throw from any brother-in- 
trade. Following this hereditary instinct, 
that firm still continues to fly in the same 
direction. Some ten or twelve years after 
this, this westward migration also took effect 
in the case of a neighbouring bookseller, 
Alexander Watson, who removed from 51 
Broad Street to 95 Union Street, (now occu- 
pied by Messrs. Lumsden & Gibson). 

As the annual migration of birds cannot 
be stopt, so, neither can the periodical mig- 
ration of those who wish to follow their 
customers, both are natural laws. Strictly 
and strongly conservative although the mem- 
bers of the firm of A. Brown & Co. might 
be, they could not resist the tendency of the 



times, nor the effect of it upon their business, 
which under the management of Mr. Frost 
did not show that continued advance it had 
hitherto shown. Rather the reverse, and so 
removal was decided on, after having been in 
Broad Street for nearly thirty years. 

Sixty years ago space in Aberdeen was not 
so valuable in Union Street as it is at present. 
There was abundant room there, and to spare, 
and the firm, with a library of 55,000 vol- 
umes, a stock of about 30,000 books for 
sale, and with many huge bundles of books 
in sheets, and stationery, required large and 
ample room. Besides this, there was the 
musical library, (containing nearly 20,000 
pieces), which being now given up, was stored 
in damp cellars under the Athenaeum, and 
roited there for fifteen years, when it was sold 
by auction, and brought simply the price of 
waste paper. 

The premises No. 7 1 Union Street, to which 
the "Book-Stall" was removed in 1831, has 
been so entirely altered by the formation of 
Market Street, and the changes made by the 
National Bank on the buildings, that it is 
difficult to convey an idea of it now, especially 
since the removal of the piazza on the east, 
which like that still remaining on the west, 
curtailed the width of Market Street. The 
three houses on the east belonged to Mr. A. 
Knox, mail contractor, and the upper floors 
of these houses were occupied by Isaac 
Machray, the proprietor of the Royal Hotel, 
then the principal hotel in the city. The 
stables at the back were entered by a narrow 
lane from Putachieside, and over this lane, 
Brown & Co. erected a three storey building, 
and through it got access to the upper flats 
of a large house in Putachieside, and thus in 
addition to their shop fronting Union Street, 
they had ten spacious rooms, in which, with 
ample shelving, it was a pleasure for the 
assistants to easily lay hands on any book 
which might be wanted, and a pleasure also 



Parcel Post Boxes, made of w / od ' s ; rong ' , ch T and Light ' 

_^^_____ from id. to I/- each. 



A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Teacher's Bibles 

OXFORD 6- LONDON EDITIONS, 

In a Variety of Different Sizes and Bindings, 

From 2/6 upwards. 




The Smallest Bible in the World, from 3/6, 
The Finger New Testament, from 2/, 
The Finger Prayer- Books, from 2/, 

Are Marvels of Production, both as to Printing and Binding. 

POCKET BIBLES, from 1/- to 31/6. 
PEW BIBLES, Very Large Print, 3/6, 6/, and 10/. 




Prayer Books, 



With Hymns 

A. and M., 



In One Volume, or Two Volumes in Case. 



Prayer Books, 

With Scotch Communion Office, 

ij, 1/3, 1/6, 2/6, & 3/6. 
A. BROWN & CO., 

J J Union Street, Aberdeen. 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



183 



to play high jinks in by themselves, or with 
customers, youthful or sedate, who found 
their way into the back premises in search of 
knowledge. The rooms were admirably 
suited for the storage and display of books ; 
far more so than the old premises, and we 
get an idea of the then current rents, in 
finding that, exclusive of the building of the 
connecting narrow tenement over the lane, 
the rent charged for all this was only ^75 
per annum. 

Notwithstanding the fact that two of the 
partners in the "Book-Stall" were strict 
Presbyterians, as the managing partner was a 
rigid Episcopalian, and latterly was apt to 
speak with contempt of all other denomina- 
tions, the business, from being a purely 
literary one, having business connections with 
members of all the churches, gradually 
became more and more frequented and 
patronized by those who were specially fav- 
oured by the managing partner. 

And when the religious revival began to 
make itself felt in the early years of this 
century, showing itself first as a ground swell 
in the activity of Dissenters, and in the 
union of the two seceding bodies in 1820; 
then, in the Puseyite and Ritualistic revival 
of church practice in England ; and lastly in 
the triumph of Evangelicalism in the Scottish 
Church — society began to range itself into 
parties, which got more and more distinct, and 
businesses, particularly that of bookselling, 
became centres round which the partizans 
rallied — influential fountains for the dissemi- 
nation of opinion — and getting mixed up with 
the separate currents of opinion, were carried 
along with them, and divided from each other 
into distinctive classes. 

Both Provost Brown and his son William, 
as might have been expected, if there is any 



truth in hereditary influences, took their part 
with the Non-Intrusion section of the Church 
of Scotland, as led by Dr. Chalmers, while 
on the same principle, all Mr. Frost's sym- 
pathies were with the members of the 
moderate party, the high and dry men, who 
in his opinion, fulfilled all Christian duty by 
regularly paying their half-yearly accounts, 
and as regularly buying from him some vol- 
umes of sermons to retail to their flocks 
during the next six months. Of this class of 
customers there were some characteristic 
specimens of the genus with whom he was 
on intimate terms. For it must be remem- 
bered that as yet the Scottish Episcopalians 
did not venture to speak of their clergymen 
as "Priests," nor of their denomination as 
"The Church." This belief, if then even 
dreamt of, like that of the divine right of 
kings, had received very rude handling by the 
events of history and the force of circum- 
stances ; and although it might have been 
held by a few amongst them, such as the 
primitive and saintly Bishop Jolly ; yet such 
titles and claims were strongly objected to by 
worthy and esteemed Bishop W. Skinner, 
who with many of his flock were disposed to 
be well content with their position amongst 
the other churches in the land. And such 
claims were entirely repudiated by the Catholic 
Bishop Ewing, who might be freely accepted 
as a Bishop of Christ's church by many, if 
not most Presbyterians. 

But for the English Ritualists, Dr. Pusey, 
Keble, and others, this title and claim would 
at that time never have been heard of in 
Scotland. Bound by Acts of Parliament, 
and fettered by decisions of the Privy 
Council, members of either, being not ne- 
cessarily members of "The Church," but 
possibly Jews or Agnostics, the earnest 
English Ritualists, in their Tractarian fever, 



If you want to 



Sign a Trust Deed or make your Will, 



Get a Form from A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 
TRUST DEED FORMS, 6d. ; WILL FORMS, 3d., 4d., 6d. 



1 84 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Purses. 




Tuck Purses, in Morocco, 

One Shilling to Six Shillings. 




SHUT. 




OPEN. 



Band Purses, 

One Shilling upwards. 




Bag Purses, in Morocco, 
From Sixpence. 



A. BroWr\ & Go., 

77 Ur\ior\ Street, Aberdeen. 



BI=S^=3S 






PRICES. 




ggsgazae 



7? 



7o 6<? /?atf o/ a// 
ABERDEEN STATIONERS. 

easonable Prices and Good Work 



W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers. 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberfceen. 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries." 




*£T\ • 4 4 GOOD VARIETY at 

JtSlDleS, Brown's, . • 

n - l_ 77 UNION STREET 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



185 



envied the independence of their small 
Scottish sister-church, and forgetting the 
political causes in which this arose, would 
fain have filled her position, free and un- 
controlled as she was. 

Largely owing to this feeling, a new day 
seemed dawning on Scottish Episcopacy, and 
to the glad and grateful surprise of its mem- 
bers, after an ice-bound period of more than 
a hundred years, during which they had been 
harassed and down-trodden at home, and 
accustomed to more frowns than flattery from 
their English brethren ; the wintry wind 
suddenly ceased, the cold blasts of censure 
and isolation gave place to the balmy breath 
of Puseyite praise, and under its genial 
influence, the dry bones gathered together, 
bone to bone, and discarding the Jacobite 
integument, became clothed with flesh — arose 
— moved, and began to assert itself. 

It was worth while to have lived and seen 
the awakening of this section of the church 
militant, especially in that district where its 
roots had sunk deep. Under the new and 
genial influences, the plant suddenly sprung 
up with vigour and new life, and it budded, 
bloomed, and blossomed like a true Scottish 
thistle, with, as Dr. John Brown would say, 
a considerable amount of the Nemo me 
element in it — not perhaps solely confined to 
it, but in it, culminating in assumptions which 
practically unchurched nine-tenths of their 
fellow countrymen. 

What is related of the wounded French 
soldier, that, when the doctor was probing 
for the bullet, he said, " a little deeper and 
you will find the Emperor," might — with the 
substitution of the name of Prince Charlie — - 
have been said by almost every Scottish 
Episcopalian, down to the early years of this 
century. Even then their feelings against 
Presbytery, as identified with adherence to 
the new dynasty, was incredibly strong and 
bigoted. When May Forbes, a niece of 
Bishop Drummond, so far forgot her narrow 
sectarian creed as to accept the Rev. George 
Pirie, parish minister of Slains (the father 
of Principal Pirie), as her husband, the re- 
mark of her uncle the Bishop, was, that "he 
would not presume to limit the mercies of 
God, but he was sorry for poor May /" 



The partnership, founded as it was on 
business prospects alone, without any refer- 
ence to congeniality of sentiment in the 
partners, was anomalous, could hardly have 
been attractive at first, and never became a 
cordial one. Forty years rubbing in the 
world, with its varied experiences, had ex- 
tinguished all traces of his Seceder training 
in the Provost, who became an elder of the 
West Kirk in 1827. 

But if he had been beguiled into seeming 
carelessness as to his religious profession, by 
the honours of the world showered upon him, 
his pious and estimable wife was not so. 
Thirty years past, she, the descendant of 
pious forbears, all connected with the Estab- 
lished Church, had accepted him as a 
Seceder, and had cast in her lot with them, 
and now, from principle, hard as she 
must have felt it, refused to leave their com- 
munion, and to this she steadfastly adhered, 
till death united them in a wider communion. 
And she had her reward, for although her 
sons took office in the Established Church, 
the good seed sown by her in precept and 
example, coupled, shall we say with a 
diluted heredity, so operated that two of them 
became influential ministers of the Free 
Church of Scotland, and by being called to 
the Moderator's chair, received the highest 
honours which that church could confer, and 
were recognised by all as worthy of the 
honour, and conferring honour on the office. 



Cbristmas l[Mi33le, 



Find the word " Christmas'''' in the following lines. 



Chill winter with us once again ; 

Oh ! how the keen winds blow ; 
For on the hill and on the plain 

Is piled the drifted snow. 
Blows not a flower on bank or bower — 

A frost flower on the pane, 
But seems the eyes to tantalize 

Bloom searching for in vain : — 
Here's thesis, find out who pleases. 



86 



Brown's Book-Stall. 




Books f of Boys and Girls. 



Bunyip Land: The 

Story of a Wild Jour- 
ney in New Guinea. By 
G. Manville Fenx. 
With 12 full page Ill- 
ustrations by Gordon 
Browne. 4/6. 

Richard Tregallas: 

A Memoir of his Adven- 
tures in the West Indies 
in 1781. By Lawson 
Johnstone. 2/8. 

Robinson Crusoe. 1/6 to 5/8. 
Grimm's Fairy Tales. From 1/6. 
Traitor or Patriot? 

A Tale of the Rye- House 
Plot. By Mary C. Row- 
sell. With 6 full-page 
Pictures by C. O. Murray 
and C. J. Staniland, r.i. 
2/8. 

Dusty Diamonds, Cut 
and Polished : A Tale 

of City Arab Life and 
Adventure. By R. M. 
Ballantyne. 3/9. 

The Hot Swamp : A Romance of Old Albion. By 
R. M. Ballantyne. 3/9. 

Andersen's Fairy Tales. From 1/6. 

Gytha's Message : A 

Tale of Saxon England. 
By Emma Leslie. With 
4 page Pictures by C. J. 
Staniland, r.i. i/ii. 

In Greek Waters : A 

Tale of the Grecian War 
of Independence. By G. 
A. Henty. 4/6. 

Berie the Briton : A 

Tale of the Roman Inva- 
sion. By G. A. Henty. 
12 Illustrations. 4/6. 

Arabian Nights. From 1/6. 



LATEST NOTION 





These Prices for Cash only. 



A. Brown & Co., 

y j Union Street, Aberdeen. 



THE NEW 

Ever-Ready 



SEAL 



(Patent applied for ). 
EngpavecL witf) Initial or? Fane^ Device. 

NO hardening of Wax before impression, and consequent 

loss of temper ! 

SO Simple, yet SO Effective ! ! 



PRICES- 

Escritoire Box containing Seal and 4 Sticks of Wax, 1/- 

Larger Seal of better quality, 1/- 



To be had of Messrs. A. BROWN & CO., 

and all Aberdeen Stationers. 



Skin Dressing. 



^Sl "C"VERY description of Home and 

jdajjfiBteW *~^ Foreign Skins carefully prepared 

jjj4» i|By and beautifully mounted on cloth. 

MbSLWWUl ^ eer Skins Dressed and Manufactured 

*flJ™pSS^ into Hearth and Hall Rugs. Old Mats 

»H> £ Cleaned, Re-dyed, and made equal 

|1 to new. It is important that these 

«^L^P^ goods should be sent to the Actual 

Manufacturer^ in order that they may receive immediate 

and proper attention. 

A lexander Laing y 

Roger s Walk, John Street, Aberdeen 




To be had of all Stationers. 




MR. E. T. SMITH, 
Present proprietor of brown's Book-stall. 



i88 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



ALBUMS Kex, 



oX^X 



In a Variety of Styles, to hold Mixed Sizes or 
Cabinets only, and in the Newest Shapes. 




The "Highland Life" Album, 

dedicated to the ^Duke and duchess of 'Fife. 
PRICE FROM 2l/- UPWARDS. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC SCREENS. 

LEATHER CASES to hold Cabinet Photographs, 2/6 each 



ALBUMS — Special Line at 10/6. 

The Album we are at present selling at 10/6 is Special Value, and would be cheap at 15/. 

A. BROWN & CO., 

j j Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



189 



Now is the winter of our discontent. 

Richard III. 




AS sweet a noon as e'er I knew, 
Altho' 'tis a November day ; 
The sun has chased the mists away 
And left the sky a cloudless blue. 

And yet, alas ! the fields are spread 
With stooks of wet ungathered grain, 
All blanched and battered by the rain, 

And harvest hopes are dull and dead. 

Sad at the sight I sought the woods, 

Where through the boughs of countless tints 
The warm tho' winter sunshine glints, 

And more than summer silence broods. 

For not a sound salutes the ear ; 

The woodland choristers are dumb, 

And not a bee or insect's hum 
Disturbs the still leaves hanging sere. 

The silence had a wistful thrill : 
As if the voice of nature ran : 
"Tho' grieves the anxious heart of man 

I look beyond a partial ill." 

So, though the tinted shade was sweet, 

And the unwonted sunny rays 

Set all the golden leaves ablaze, 
I hastened from the still retreat. 

"Tho' I have no immediate share," 

I said, "in this lamented loss, 

Sinking the single in the gross 
I'll strive to bear with those who bear." 

So forth I went among my friends 
And sung of hope and better cheer, 
That long before the closing year 

Good fortune yet might make amends. 

And tho' I fail in prophecy, 

Yet this can never fail to charm — 
The cheerful, hopeful word, and warm 

And keen whole-hearted sympathy. 

For tho' secure from Fortune's freak, 

And all around inanely please, 

Better to shun "inglorious ease," 
And help the struggle of the weak. 



I am sure care's an enemy to life.— Twelfth Night. 



©ur 3llustrattons. 




HE portrait of the editorial 
"we" which appears on page 
187, is from a photograph 
taken by Messrs. G. cS: W. 
Morgan, at the new high- 
class studio, which they have 
recently opened in Bridge Place. 



'Tis sad to think that while we can get a very good 
photograph in Aberdeen, we need to go to the Continent 
for the best process blocks. Yet so it is. The block 
for our portrait, and also that for the old view of 
Aberdeen, were both made in Austria. We like to 
keep our ain fish guts for our ain sea maws as much 
as possible ; but what will you, when the competitive 
foreigner gives a better block for less money ? 



Our view of Aberdeen in the olden time, is a re- 
production of a pen and ink drawing after a coloured 
lithograph published about 1820. But we can't give 
further particulars, as the artist and publisher of the 
original plate have been too modest to give any in- 
formation about themselves. 



We give two specimen illustrations from story books. 
That on page 208 is from a very interesting story of 
adventure by D. L. Johnstone, entitled, "Richard 
Tregellas," price 2/8 cash. The other, page 195, is 



from a more juvenile work, 
ful," price 9d. — 



Little Miss Master- 



Our contemporary, the Detroit Free Press, once 
called attention to the illustrations in its Christmas 
Number as showing what a backwoodsman could do 
with a block of wood and a hatchet. Needless to say, 
the beauty of the pictures gave point to the joke. But 
our Finis illustration is a veritable jack-knife business, 
with no deception about it whatever. The cut is the 
actual one that appeared on the slips vended by the 
late lamented Blin' Bob and his compeers, purporting 
to contain a "full, true, and particular account" of 
the execution, and "the last dying speech and declar- 
ation," of some poor wretch who had looked his last 
look on earth "doon Marischal Street." 



190 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



ALL SORTS of 
Reading Lamps, 

Drawing Room 
Lamps, 

Hall Lamps, 

Outside Lamps, 

and 

Lamps 

of Every Description 



SCOTT CHALMERS, 

(Seneral and furnishing ironmonger, 



MAKES A 
SPECIALTY OF 



MIPS 



AND 



BRASS-WORK 
FURNISHINGS. 



88 Union Street, 
#berbeen. 



TRY. 



Lnttlejokr\ & SoiVs 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



191 



H ffantasta in the flfooonligbt 





* S I lay in bed last night waiting for 
sleep, the new moon rose over against 
my unscreened window and covered 
the chamber floor and part of the 
bed with its bright white glory. In the still- 
ness and the moonlight my thoughts went out 
to the world ; and to the range of my fancy, 
time and space and artificial barriers were as if 
they had not been. The roar of the city was 
hushed to a distant hum, out of which came 
at intervals the rattle of a cab in one of the 
nearer streets, the chimes in the steeples, the 
whistle and rush of a train on the line over 
yonder to the west, or the short, husky scream 
from the horn of some steamer passing down the channel to 
the great unstable, silent sea. 

While the moonbeams lay across my bed, bringing in a 
sense of the world without, memory travelled to the scenes I 
had witnessed, imagination to those of which I had heard or 
read. As I turned the kaleidoscope of my brain, cities, faces, 
and incidents, woodland glades and open plains, misty mount- 
ains and shadowy reaches of river crowded closely one on 
another. There were the streets of a great western centre, with 
their motley crowds of city mashers and ragged, vociferous 
newsboys ; women sweeping past in their furs and jewellery ; 
women plodding and plashing barefooted over the sloppy pave- 
ment, some drunk and good-natured in their guilt and shame, 
others sober and blue and pinched in their half-conscious 
wretchedness, but each equally heedless of the other. Over all 
the sense of a great unrest, the pursuit of something unattained, 
perhaps unattainable ! 

There beyond the city lay the open country ; the crofter's 
cottage sending forth its perspective of light from the lowly 
window ; the moon shining down on black, deserted mining gear, 
on sheds and trucks and shafting, on engines whose throbbing 
pistons and whirling wheels had ceased their motion for a time. 
There again great tongues of flames shot up from white-hot 
furnaces, around which grimy men moved like ghouls decocting 
their hell-broth ; while in the distance the mansion of King 
Capital reared itself, proud and stately, severely grateful that the 
whole world was not yet a wilderness. 

But on speed the tireless wings of fancy ; forward, ever 
forward. Over low-lying pasture lands ; over broad rivers, 
winding like vast sinuous sheets of glass ; over bare, bleak, 
border moorlands. Past the mighty sleeping hills that throw up 
their snow-clad peaks to the moon ; past still, dark upland 
homesteads, their flocks and herds gathered safe in fold and stall, 
while "labour sweet in sleep is locked." Over more black, 
blasted treeless wastes, more mining country, more bale fires 
burning around cities as of the damned. In those cities' streets 
the gas lamps shine upon late revellers staggering and swagger- 



ing homewards ; upon women moving on their patrol of shame 
and misery ; upon outcasts and wanderers dragging their weary 
steps anywhere, anywhere out of the world— the exit only so 
long deferred ! But away, away lies our course ; away from 
this black Aceldama of sorrow ! Over muddy midland lanes— 
the pools in the cart ruts glancing back the moonbeams ; over 
lonely fens and slumbering villages, their only light (now the 
night is advancing) coming from the window of that upper 
room where the stertorous breathing of sick life will soon pass 
into the death rattle, and the light of a soul will go out. Over 
sable, solemn forests ; over fields in which the winter furrows 
have to-day been turned ; over canals and market gardens and 
straggling hamlets— till at last the pale moonlight grows paler in 
the lurid glare of a spreading, all-embracing province of brick 
and lath and plaster, of streets and squares, of palaces, churches, 
and factory chimneys, bisected by a tangle of masts and funnels 
and bridges, with spaces of open water between. 

In this great heart and centre of the world's life the piston 
stroke and the whir of wheels surely never stop ! The wharves 
are noisy with sweating, swearing men ; messengers flit from 
street to street ; carriages roll over the stones all night ; while 
waggons lumber to market with to-morrow's food. Here in 
greatest plenitude the wealth of the world seems gathered ; 
here also poverty appears at its deepest depth of concentrated 
wretchedness. Here the mansions run on, rank behind rank, 
with the continuity of Atlantic billows ; here the hovels and 
warrens stretch abroad their reeking, festering squalor in most 
appalling vastness. 'Tis here that poets and sages starve in 
garrets and rot in cellars ; here, above all places else, that men 
with thoughts like the great of old toil in penury and grief for 
sending their bright, far-seeing souls three centuries in the van. 
Hither it is that devoted ones fly from the destiny that dogs 
them elsewhere, hoping they may haply evade their doom amid 
the multitude of their fellows ; and 'tis here their destiny at last 
overtakes them, and one night they take their last look of the 
world from some of yonder bridges that span the remorseless 
flood below, while the great church bell beats out their last hour 
on earth. 

It is not easy to pass from this congeries of mortals, with 
its joy and its woe, its glow and its gloom. Tradition hovers 
around it. The history of centuries has been made in it. 
Poetry and art and heroism are linked with its dull streets and 
public places. It holds us with the spell attaching to the play 
of human interests on the great scale. But the light is wan and 
the night is cold ; and at last fancy flags and reels at the press 
of rushing images. Let us up and on. Surely somewhere in 
the world there are cities wholly fair beneath the moon. 

Southward, then ! ever southward ! Over orchards, with 
their trees now bare ; over gardens late bright with the hop 
blossoms, and cheery with the chatter of city girls picking 
among the festooned poles. Over massive manor houses em- 
bosomed in rich woodlands ; the lord of the manor burning the 
midnight oil yonder in the pursuit of knowledge which, un- 
communicated, will die with himself, profiting him little, others 
not at all. 



192 Brown's Book-Stall. 



G. Mitchell Moir, 

^^U-w Music Seller, 



r "w^ffiy^PlrjJLlrlliii t t r^\ • r* i r 

W^^^>^f-mA¥^' a most Choice Selection of- 






American Organs 
Vmm 'fS and Pianos. 




<fe Union Street, Aberdeen. 



FOR PARTICULARS OF OUR 

Great Clearing JSale 



SEE THE DAILY PAPERS. 



4MK.S HMHN & CO., 

Jewellers, Watchmakers, and Opticians, 

235 Brompton Road, London, 

74 Princes Street, Edinburgh, and 

53 &|(I0|t gT^EET, SBEHDEEp. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



193 



And now we leave behind us the white cliffs that looked 
coldly on Caesar's legions two thousand years ago— the cliffs that 
welcomed the Phoenician mariner to these shores in the days 
when history was young. We are speeding across the Channel, 
and on the further side the shore-line of a continent lies dim and 
low. Yet a little while, and, glory of eld ! the spires and 
gables, the turrets, balconies, and vistas of Romance lie asleep 
in beautiful Rouen there beneath us, and the Seine sweeps past 
from Paris as it did when Henry wooed his "sweet Kate" here 
long centuries ago. 

To the north-east lies Amiens, to the south-east the pinnacles 
of Notre Dame, and many a league north and east and over the 
border Strasbourg and Cologne would invite us further afield. 
But already we have travelled far and seen much, and we may 
not better the prospect of Rouen and the joy of its calm loveli- 
ness as of another world and another time. Switzerland sits 
aloft in the distance, beautiful with an Alpine pastoral beauty, and 
knowing not the extreme of poverty because it knows not the 
extreme of wealth. But Switzerland is only remembered fitfully ; 
and the beggars and grandees of Italy, its churches and galleries, 
its priests and its ruins gleam but brokenly across the imagina- 
tion. There are the wrecks of an ancient and fallen Empire — 
fallen because its people knew not the secret of living 

TOGETHER. 

Let us linger by Rouen. It may be that this city was built 
by serfs ; but if their bodies were fixed to one spot of earth 
their minds were free and open to monitions of the beautiful ; 
whereas men to-day are bodily free, but mentally bound, and 
can but copy the work of alert and healthy souls. 

We will manufacture and sell to all the world ; but we make 
and sell selfishly. Our industry and commerce and financial 
gambling throw beggars on the streets, put maniacs in Bedlam, 
and garrison our prisons with felons and murderers. The 
windows of the soul look out every day upon such blighted and 
befouled landscapes as we have passed to-night, such rivers as 
we have seen flowing open sewers through our cities. Shirts may 
be bought for little money, but at what a price in the degrada- 
tion of our sisters, who avenge the sins of the father on the son 
and the son's son. Our iron ships plough distant seas in every 
part of the planet, but we live at home in hell-holes, and poverty 
and ugliness will not be shut out from us even in our innermost 
retreats of luxury and ease. 

The moon now began to glide behind the shadows ; colour 
and form became broken and jumbled in the kaleidoscope ; and 
at last I slept. But so surely as I rose this morning the secret 
of living together in beauty and brotherhood will be dis- 
closed to us, and in the years to come the world will lie more 
lovely under the moonlight than ever before. 

J.L. 



A fine specimen of the "Vinegar" Bible, dated 
17 17, has been presented by Lord and Lady Rook- 
wood, to Hatfield Broad Oak Church, Essex. 




Samie Mstbe's Cl^acfc Sano. 



Air- 



■ Clean Pease Strae." 



NOO' Winter wi' his blusterin' breeze 
Sweeps owre the shiverin' lea ; 
And soughin' 'mang the leafless trees 
Wakes mournfu' melody ; 
And clamourously the ragin' win' 

Comes thuddin' at the door ; 
But couthilie we're set within, 
Sae lat it rap and roar — 

For here aroon the ingle bricht, 

In friendship kind and true, 
We're met to hae a hearty nicht 
And celebrate the Ploo. 

The reaper's sang nae mair is heard, 

The ban'ster's glee is gane ; 
And Robin-reidbriest, dowie bird, 

He cheerless chirps alane ; 
The leadin' bye, bare ilka rig, 

The hairst han's haud for hame, 
The stacks are theekit ticht and trig — 
To doot wad be a shame — 

Then ane and a', Jock, Jean, and Rab, 

Strik' in and join me noo' — 
The shuttle o' the farmer's wab — 
The staunch unfailin' Ploo. 

We've met afore on nichts like this — 

Maybe we'll meet again, 
They help to mak' life's burden less 

And cheat Care o' his pain ; 
'Tween win' and weet, thro' slush and sleet, 

The wark's been late and lang, 
Complein wha daur, things micht be waur, 
And sae I end my sang — 

Wi' ance again in chorus boys, 

For this ye will aloo', 
The key note to our chiefest joys 
Maun aye be Speed the Ploo. 

A WAIF. 



K« 



194 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



THOMAS NELSON & SONS' 

NeWBoo^HeWEdftion? 

In the Days of Chivalry. A Tale of the Times of 
the Black Prince. By E. Everett-Green, author of 
"Loyal Hearts and True," "The Church and the King," 
&c. Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 5s. 

Monk and Knight. A Tale. By Frank VV. 

Gunsaulus. Crown 8vo, cloth extra. Price 4s. 

Maud Melville's Marriage. A Tale of the Seven- 
teenth Century. By E. Everett-Green, author of "In 
the Days of Chivalry," &c. Post 8vo, cloth extra. 3s. 6d. 

Chris. Willoughby; or, Against the Current. A 
Tale for Boys. By Florence E. Burch, author of "Dick, 
Harry, and Tom," &c. Post 8vo, cloth extra. 3s. 6d. 

The Forlorn Hope. By A.L.O.E., author of 

"The Iron Chain and the Golden," "Beyond the Black 
Waters," &c. Post 8vo, cloth extra. Price 2s. 6d. 

With the Admiral of the Ocean Sea. A Nar- 
rative of the first Voyage to the Western World. Drawn 
mainly from the Diary of Christopher Columbus. By 
Charles Paul MacKie. Crown 8vo, cloth extra. 3s. 
With gilt edges, 3s. 6d. 

The Robber Baron of Bedford Castle. A Story 

of the 13th Century. By A. J. Foster, M.A., Vicar of 
Wootton, Beds., and E. E. Cuthell. Post 8vo, cloth 
extra. Price 2s. 

Cyril's Promise. A Temperance Tale. By Will- 
iam J. Lacey, author of "Through Storm to Sunshine,' 
&c. Post 8vo, cloth extra. Price 2s. 

Lost in the Wilds of Canada. By Eleanor 

Stredder, author of "The Merchant's Children," "Alive 
in the Jungle," &c. Post 8vo, cloth extra. 2s. 

In Green Pastures. Readings for every Day in the 

Year. By J. R. Miller, D.D., author of "Come ye 
Apart," &c. Elegant doth binding, tinted edges, is. 6d. 

Daffodil. (A Brave Little Lady). By Maude M. 
Butler, author of "Waiting and Serving," &c. Post 8vo, 
cloth extra. Price is. 

The Children's Treasury of Pictures and 

Stories for 1893. Beautifully Illustrated. With choice 
Illuminated Cover. Boards. Price is. 

Royal Quarto Edition. With Exquisite Coloured Pictures. 
The Peep of Day. A Series of the Earliest Re- 
ligious Instruction the Infant Mind is capable of receiving, 
with Verses Illustrative of the Subjects. With Six Coloured 
Plates and numerous Wood-cut Illustrations. Royal 4to, 
Fancy Manilla Boards, price 2s. 6d. ; cloth extra, price 3s. 6d. 

The Favourite Book of Nursery Tales. With 

Seventy-two Full-page Coloured Pictures. In attractive 
Binding. 8vo, cloth extra. Price 4s. With gilt side and 
full-gilt edges. Price 5s. 

"It is gorgeously illustrated by seventy-two full-page col- 
oured pictures. The book is a handsome production." — 
Scotsman. 



T. Nelson & Sons, 

London, Edinburgh & New York. 



G 



AMES! 



OF ALL - - 



Sorts for 
Old and - 
Young. - - 




Tiddledy Winks, i/, is still First 

Favourite. 

Next in Popularity comes 
Halma, for 2 players, 6d. and i/, 

for 4 players, 2/. 
Ludo, i/- ; Bob o' Link, 1/. 
Vice-Versa, 1/. 

Reversi, 1/ ; Backgammon, 1/. 
Wordmaking and Wordtaking, i/. 
Draught Men, 6d. and i/. 
Chess Men, i/- to 6/. 
Boards for Chess or Draughts, 6d. 

upwards. 
Tourlourou, i/-; Toplington, i/. 
Chinese Card Game, Khanhoo, 2/6 



A. Brown & Co., 

77 UNION STREET. 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



195 



Frame your mind to mirth and merriment, 
Which bars a thousand harms, and lengthens life. 

Taming of the Shrew. 



Some Jmas IFlumbers of '92. 



I. Xmas Numbers Generally. 

I"^^HE Christmas Number was originally intended 
\\\ to supply a long felt want. Whether it did so 
J[ or not I cannot tell, but if one may judge 
from the number of newspaper proprietors, private 
individuals, and limited liability 
companies which now send forth 
Christmas Numbers of one kind 
or another, the want must be a 
very pressing one. This parti- 
cular form of periodical has 
latterly developed like the bur- 
lesque stage, the sea serpent, 
and the cholera, into one of the 
luxuries of the age, without which 
life would indeed be a blank, 
and the magazine or newspaper 
which does not contrive about 
this time to get out a Christmas 
Number, or at least an extra 
special edition with a mistletoe 
heading, is looked upon as a 
decidedly dying concern; while 
the individual who cannot con- 
trive in some way or another — 
though it only be that his father- 
in-law once knew an editor, who 
(but I won't inflict it on you) 
— to be connected with a paper 
having a Christmas Number is 
a disgrace to the community. True, we have not 
yet reached that stage of civilization when The Times 
will give away a plate in one hundred and twenty four 
colours, entitled "Foolish Flossie," or the Nineteenth 
Century inflict upon its readers a story of a ghost who 
had lost its appetite, but we are getting that way. 
At anyrate the demand for Xmas Numbers is now 
something enormous, and the issues of the principal 
magazines are generally sold out within a day or two 
after publication. Pears' Annual is a striking 
example of this, the entire edition being exhausted 
last year, after which single copies were valued at 
half-a-crown each ; the moral of all which is, let the 



intending purchaser take the advice of Dorothy and 
"be wise in time," which, being interpreted, means, 
give your orders to A. Brown & Co., at once. 




Reduced Illustration from "Little Miss Masterful 



II. Xmas Numbers in Particular. 

A respected citizen of Bon-Accord, now numbered 
with the great majority, used to politely remark as he 
ushered me into his house in front of him, while I, 
with becoming modesty, would stand aside to give him 
precedence, "Youth on all occasions before Beauty." 
Well, if I'm not an Adonis he needn't have referred 
so pointedly to the fact, but that 
is neither here nor there. Of 
course you want to know what 
all this has got to do with the 
Xmas Numbers. Patience, my 
gentle reader, patience ; if you 
had only waited you would have 
enabled me to explain that in the 
present case I have disregarded 
the claims of both Youth and 
Beauty, and given premier place 
to Age. Not but what the Xmas 
Number of the Illustrated London 
News can hold its own in the 
matter of attractiveness with any, 
or all of its younger rivals, but it 
is not on that account that I 
place it first here. Established 
in 1842, the News was the pioneer 
of illustrated weekly journalism, 
and this year's Xmas issue seems 
to prove that age cannot wither 
its many excellences. The price 
is still a shilling, with propably 
a reduction on taking a quantity. 
Hood's Comic Annual (i/-), is an old established 
favourite, and for variety of contents, certainly demol- 
ishes the Mitchell & Muil. No less than fifty authors 
contribute in prose and verse to its pages, while the 
artists include such well known names as, George 
Gatcombe, Maurice Greiffenhagen, and Alfred Chase- 
more. By the way, an old Aberdeen favourite, Mr. 
A. Dewar Willock, the author of the touching little 
verses "She Noddit to Me," which first appeared in a 
local contemporary, and won the approval of Her 
Most Gracious Majesty, contributes a characteristic 
tale, "The McTavish," to the Annual. 

I have only read one story in the Graphic Xmas 



196 Brown's Book-Stall. 






Cabinet /Ifoafcers ano XUpbolsterevs, 

Have now completed extending and improving their 

Shorn t{ooms at ^^ 

^^ 257 U]H0|1 STREET, 

and would invite inspection of their Large and Very Choice Stock of 

Cabinet and ift^holstery Goods. 



^be Cabinet jf UttlitUte made in their own Workshop wi! 
be found all that could be desired in Design and Workmanship. 



Zbck flew Cavpet Saloon is stocked with k the , 

best makes 01 

British and Foreign Carpets, Linoleums, 
Mattings, Rugs, &c, 
|i| Curtains and Upholstery Materials. 

IbOlbUnt Cabinet Hflj0rk8 are now the Largest in the North 

of Scotland, and are furnished with the latest and best Labour-Saving 
Machinery worked by Steam Power. Every Department is under 
Competent Superintendence, and a thoroughly qualified Designer has 
been lately added to the Staff. They are thus enabled to offer 
unusual advantages as regards Style, Material, and Workmanship. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



197 



Number (1/-), and wild horses wouldn't induce me to 
spoil the impression of J. M. Barrie's delightful 
sketch, "Two of Them," by reading another. It is 
certainly the very best of the short stories contributed 
to the numberless Xmas periodicals I have perused, 
and possesses all the delightful humour and striking 
originality so characteristic of the author of "The 
Little Minister." The place so ably filled by the late 
Randolph Caldicott in the illustrating of this period- 
ical has fallen to Mr. Hugh Thomson, and right well 
does he deserve the distinction. The other illustra- 
tions are all of the seasonable and amusing kind, with 
which former Xmas Graphics have made us familiar. 

Pouf-la, (i/-),is the suggestive and appropriate title 
given to the Round Table Annual issued from Judy 
office. The contents are articles and poems con- 
tributed by the leading artists of the London Variety 
Stage, illustrated by very life like sketches of the 
various contributors, from the clever pencils of Alfred 
Bryan, Hal Ludlow and George Gatcombe. I like 
the modesty of Miss Ada Reeve who candidly confesses 
that this is her first literary effort, and begs the kind 
indulgence of the reader in consequence. Albert 
Chevalier contributes a few verses, and an amusing 
sketch of her adventures in Dublin is written by Miss 
Nellie L'Eslrange. As the Editor says in the 
preface, if the volume is not a success, it can't possibly 
be the fault of the contributors, and must lie at the 
door of the Great B. P. 

Though but a comparatively young paper, the Xmas 
number issued by Black and White ( 1/- ) more than holds 
its own with the old established favourites. In the 
matter of illustration I doubt if it is equalled, and the 
literary fare includes contributions from the pens of 
Brete Harte and Eden Phillpotts. The coloured 
plate, "Where are you going to, my Pretty Maid?" 
which accompanies the number, is a charming picture 
of an exceedingly pretty girl who smiles patronizingly, 
after the manner of her kind, on the unseen pro- 
pounder of the query. 

C. H. Ross's Christmas Chronicle of Fashion, Fancy, 
Fun and Fact (1/-), is characteristic of the creator of 
the immortal "Sloper." The number abounds in 
amusing illustrations by Alfred Chasemore, F. Bar- 
nard, Harold Furniss, W. G. Baxter, and any number 
of others. Those who enjoy a hearty laugh at whim- 
sicalities of the Sloper order, and do not despise the 
good old woodcuts as a means of illustration, will find 
this a shillingsworth after their own heart. 

The Great Shadow, is the promising title of 



Messrs. Arrowsmith's Annual (1/-). The handy form 
in which the "bookie" is published would alone 
commend it to the annual loving public, but in Dr. 
Conan Doyle's exciting tale, they will get full value 
for their twelve pennies. Messrs. Arrowsmith gener- 
ally contrive to secure the work of about as good an 
author as is going, and this year has proved no excep- 
tion. Conan Doyle has made rapid strides in the 
literary world since he contributed to the good old 
B. 0. P., and admirers of the creator of Sherlock 
Holmes will not be disappointed in The Great 
Shadow, his latest production. 

Where would the Detroit Free Press be I wonder 
without that genial Scotchman, Robert Barr. Under 
his better known title of Luke Sharp, he is in great 
force in the sixpenny number issued by this popular 
weekly. His story, "The Heralds of Fame," is 
written in his usual entertaining style, and is charm- 
ingly illustrated by the Misses Hammond and Mr. 
Hal Hurst. 

Place aux Dames ! The Gentlewoman is still 
strong in the joint author business, and in the Xmas 
Number (1/-), has, I think, been more successful than 
in "The Fate of Fenella." The seven authors who 
contribute to the story of the Seven Christmas Eves, 
have worked very harmoniously together, but the 
objection to this extended collaboration seems to be 
that every new author brings in a fresh quantity of 
irrelevant introductory matter, and does not take up 
the tale where his predecessor left off. The illustra- 
tions are excellent, save that I don't think even noble 
lords when addressing the House of Commons are 
permitted to do so with their hats on, as is depicted 
in one of the sketches. 

The Capital and Labour Annual (3d.), is not often, 
I think, seen in Bon-Accord, but if ever one had 
good value for their money it is here. The number 
has really nothing to do with Capital and Labour, at 
least from a political economy point of view, but con- 
tains a most exciting tale by Robert Louis Stevenson, 
written after the fashion of his delightful "New 
Arabian Nights." The famous Prince Florizel of 
Bohemia again makes his appearance, and is, as of 
yore, successful in the settling of an all important 
question, the fate of the Rajah's Diamond. 

My lady readers had better skip this par. ; to the 
notice of the male sex only would I commend it. 
Have you, or have you not got a sweetheart ? In 
either case you had better invest a bob in Judy's 
Annual, which will tell you all about them. The 



198 Brown's Book-Stall. 



JAMES STEPHEN I SONS, 

CA^VEl^S, ©IDDE^S, 
(Uwpov and Picture Firome (Danuf-actuvevs, 

Fine Art Publishers, Artists' Golormen, k, 

48, 49, & 50 WOOLMANHILL, 
e^ ABERDEEN Kok, 

(Opposite Entrance Gate to Royal Infirmary.) 

WORKS: RODGER'S WALK, JOHN STREET. 

Telephone No. 553. 



Mirror Frames JRe-gilt ; Old Frames jRe-gilt ; EVervj Description of 

Qildirvg Work dor\e. 

#ranti Cftrtgtmag Btgptay 

^Y display of Choice Goods suitable for Christmas Presents for School, Christmas 
Tree, and New-Year Gifts to suit everybody, was never greater, nor were Goods 
ever cheaper. 

Description is impossible, but all are invited to call and inspect for 
themselves. 

Buyers of Work and Goods for Bazaars will find that my Warehouse is 
the place pre-eminent where they can be supplied on the best terms. 




John Seivwright, 

The Aberdeen Fancy Goods Warehouse & Bazaar, 
in UNION STREET. ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stalll. 



199 



moral of the whole seems to be, to those about to 
have sweethearts — dont ; to those who have, well — 
make the best of them. I must confess though, that 
some of the fair ones depicted in its pages, notably 
Jack's Lady Love — I speak in no prejudiced spirit — 
are regular — but you'd better get a copy and see for 
yourselves. 

For a generally all-round excellent Xmas Number, 
give me Yule Tide. You have a magnificent, large 
picture, in heaven only knows how many colours, by 
George Joy, four cartoons done in his own inimitable 
way by Harry Furniss, not to mention sundry lesser 
illustrations from the same pen, notably Lord Salis- 
bury shaking hands with Mr. Healy, and lastly, a 
novel which — I cannot do better than quote from the 
advertisement — is a dream yet no dream, a mystery 
without a mystery, a true story lacking truth, and a 
great truth lacking a story. Verily, if this isn't 
sufficient for the nimble shilling, you must be — shall I 
say an Aberdonian ? 

Noel Tide, a Christmas Number for the people (6d.), 
is chiefly remarkable for the charming picture "Sweet 
Seventeen" (the very name doth smack of Bon- Accord), 
which accompanies it. The stories and other matter 
of which the number is comprised, are all very read- 
able, but give me "Sweet Seventeen" — the original 
if possible. 

Encouraged by the success of their summer venture, 
his publishers have just issued Phil May's Winter 
Annual at the usual shilling. Articles by Archibald 
Forbes, G. A. Sala, Dr. Conan Doyle, I. Zangwill, 
and many others, together with a large selection of 
characteristic sketches by the now well known Phil 
May, make up an exceptionally interesting number. 
Mr. Forbes (who, by the way, once called me to 
question for saying he was an Aberdonian), has a 
very appropriate and interesting contribution on Prince 
Bismarck and the Franco-German War. 

Coming nearer home I don't suppose there is a guid- 
wife in all the countryside who hasn't digested her 
People's Journal Xmas Number by this time. What ! 
you know one who hasn't ! Then tell the dear lady 
that she has yet to see the most marvellous production 
for a penny that the nineteenth century has given 
birth to. 

My friend Mr. Gibson tells me he is going just for 
once in a way, to show you in Figaro Xmas Number 
what can really be done in the matter of illustration, 
and you know Mr. G. in his quiet way can sometimes 
astonish you ; while the genial "Quilp," who now sits 
in state up in Union Terrace, has taken a most solemn 



affidavit— before a J. P., I believe— that the Xmas 
Number of Bon-Accord is going to lick creation. 
Success to ye, says 

ST. JACK. 

Note. — The editor regrets the non-arrival in time for 
notice of the Xmas Numbers of the English Illustrated 
Magazitie, Illustrated Snorting and Dramatic News, 
Truth, Vanity Fair, The Bookseller, Punch, The 
Boys' and the Girls' Own Paper, and a number of 
others. 



A Dainty Christmas Gift Book. 

Ready, Third Edition, 
Price One Shilling & Sixpence, Nett 

Waifs of ivhyme, 

BY 

William Carnie. 



"Mr. Carnie shows in his poems a genuine insight into human 
nature, and the springs which move it. The book must be very 
dear to the sons of Bon-Accord at home and in exile. "• — Scotsman. 



To be had of A. BROWN & CO., 

77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



©urselves again. 

The following description of our firm is extracted 
from " The Industries of Scotland" : — 

A. Brown & Co., Booksellers and Stationers, 
77 Union Street, Aberdeen. — This very old business, 
which has been in existence for upwards of a hundred 
and seven years, may be regarded as having intimate 
association not only with the early stages of the 
bibliopolic industry in Scotland, but as inseparable 
from the life, growth, and intermediate development 
of the book -trade of the north, where it has borne an 
important, and it may be said a leading part in the 
introduction of valuable literature, despite the many 
difficulties which had to be surmounted at the end of 
the last — up to a good long period in the present — 
century. Established in 1785 under King George III., 
by Mr. A. Brown, who it will perhaps be remembered 
was subsequently Lord Provost of Aberdeen, it form- 
ed one of the leading book depositories in connection 
with the Episcopal Church in the north of Scotland, 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



©hristmas Presents. 



Nothing 



is more acceptable than a 5 lb. or 10 lb. Box of 

SPALDING'S FAMOUS TEA, 

at 1/10 or 2/4 per lb., 

Or some FINE OLD MALT WHISKY at 30/, 36/, 
and 42/- per dozen quarts. 



/ M. SPALDING, 

106 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



EVERYBODY shl 



Id 



ouia see 



collie & taylor's 
. Special Show 



of Cabinet, Leather, and Fancy Goods, 
1 Japanese Draught Screens and Sundries, 

Christmas Tree Decorations and Gifts, 
Games, Toys, and Dolls, 

For Christmas and the New-Year. 

NeW Illustrated Catalogue or\ application. 

123 UNION STREET. *£"« 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



201 



deriving a large support in proportion to the increased 
and increasing influences of that Church in the record 
of Scottish affairs generally. Mr. Frost — a well- 
known Aberdonian — was one of the partners some 
time after its establishment, and then Mr. William 
Brown joined some time later, while even one other 
celebrity in the person of Mr. George Walker became 
also partner so long ago as in 1850, being for a long 
time sole proprietor. The present sole proprietor, 
however, is the well-known Edward Townsend Smith, 
who succeeded to the business in 1883, since which 
year he has vigorously maintained its fine old standing 
and reputation as one of the earliest concerns of its 
kind in Scotland. The premises themselves are by no 
means devoid of interest, as one might easily fancy. 
They present a handsome double-frontage in that 
fashionable and beautiful thoroughfare, Union Street, 
being built of light grey granite, with a frontage of 
twenty-eight feet, and an internal area of the same 
extent in breadth, and extending forty-five feet towards 
the rear. Both ground floor and basement are very 
spacious, and the fittings and appointments are in suit- 
able harmony with the general character and appear- 
ance of the whole establishment. 

The number of books of a general kind includes a 
most exhaustive catalogue, all the latest books being 
a:quired immediately upon publication. In the minor 
departments there are photographic views, fancy 
stationery, high-class engravings, etchings, and general 
stationery of the best. The connection extends over 
a large part of the county among the leading 
families, who regard this establishment — under the 
diligent control of its eminent proprietor - as one 
of the most desirably appointed and fittingly con- 
stituted book concerns in the kingdom. 



As a matter of fact, the penny-a-liner who wrote 
the above, rather exaggerates the size of our present 
premises, and the accommodation contained therein, 
but curiously enough, the description he gives of our 
present location, gives a very correct idea of the 
premises into which we will remove in the course of 
next year. 

For after fifty years sojourn at No. 77, we are 
going to follow the fashion and move west — though 
but one step. 



Wan red I A ^ ew C0 P* es of ^os. 4 an d 

— 5 of "Brown's Book Stall." 



Hber&eeit about 1820, 



Description of a View about the year 1820 of part 
of the City of Aberdeen, as seen towards the 
N. and N.E., from the N. end of Crown 
Terrace, which is 23 feet above the level of 
Union Street as it crosses Union Bridge, a 
reduced copy of which is here shozvn. The 
chief features in the viezv are 

1. — Objects visible in the Foreground— 

Roofs and chimneys of houses just below the spec- 
tator, situated along the Windmill Brae, College 
Street, and the Green. 

Line of Union Street, including Union Bridge, 
from the house, afterwards that of Mr. Clemens 
Lumsden, Advocate, at the S.W. corner of Union 
Terrace (the site now of the Northern Assurance 
Company's Offices), to the house now part of the 
Forsyth Hotel, just E. of St. Nicholas Churchyard 
and Correction Wynd, both houses being on the N. 
side of the street. 

Union Bridge with its fine wide central arch, 130 
feet span, and 24 feet above the spring of the arch, 
and with its two narrow arches at the E. end, now 
hid by the Trades' Hall Buildings, and one narrow 
arch at the W. end, now hid by the Railway Palace 
Hotel. 

The S. side of the part of Union Street embraced 
in the picture shew r s no house along it. To the W. of 
the Bridge a grassy brae sloped down to the back of 
the houses on the N. side of the Windmill Brae. To 
the E. of the Bridge is a vertical wall, erected in 
1802 as a retaining wall with buttresses, to raise 
this part of the street to nearly the level of Union 
Bridge, in forming Union Street along the steep slope, 
down to the Green, of the S. end of the Back Wynd, 
Belmont Street, etc. 

On the top of this vertical wall, on the S. side of 
the pavement, was a protecting brick parapet 4 to 5 
feet high, over which one could look down on the old 
houses on the N. side of the Green, one at the bottom 
of the Back Wynd Stairs having the date 1633 on it. 
Boys used to pitch stones from Union Street down the 
chimneys of these houses. 

The S. fronts of houses on the N. side of the 
W. end of the Green, opposite Messrs. Hadden & 
Sons, Woollen Manufacturers, and on the E. side of 
the Bow Brig over the Denburn, the ancient entry into 
Aberdeen from the S. by the Bridge of Dee, the 
Hardgate, and the Windmill Brae. 

The E. end of the picture shows the N.E. corner 
of Hadden's Manufactory, with a low chimney on it, 
(on the S. side of the W. end of the Green), which 
belched out dense volumes of black smoke. These, 
especially in S. and S. E. gales of wind, used to annoy 
the public in passing along Union Street, till the 
erection, in connection with the works, in 1837, of the 
present chimney, 140 feet high, to carry off the smoke 
at a higher level. 



202 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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mJ7^ |>^f| ^Sa ffhla i&jifl {yj| «SU ATjfl ^^-^ *&** VF^, a& 
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Whist 
Markers, 

r/ ". 

per Pair, 
upwards. 



Bezique 

and 

Whist Sets. 



3/6 



Johnny Gibb 

of Gushetneuk. 

Edition de Luxe. 

Very Fine Copy. 

£2 12 6, Cash. 



A. BROWN & CO., 

j j Union Street. 






Brown's Book-Stall. 



203 



On the N. side of Union Street, between Union 
Bridge and St. Nicholas Churchyard, the picture 
shows only two of the present houses on the line. 
The W. one is the large house built as a first-class 
hotel between the E. end of the Bridge and the S. 
end of Belmont Street, and was occupied as such by 
Mrs. Macgregor, and afterwards by Mrs. Grey. The 
E. one, at the opposite corner of the S. end of Belmont 
Street, was occupied by Mr. Archibald Simpson, the 
famous Aberdeen architect, who lost many of his fine 
drawings by a fire in this house in 1828. 

The low house at the S.W. corner of the Back 
Wynd, on the site of which the Advocates' Hall was 
afterwards built. The Advocates' Hall having been 
since removed to the Town and County Buildings. 



E. as now, by the sloping gardens and backs of the 
houses on the W. side of Belmont Street. 

One of the latter houses is seen to project back- 
wards more than the rest. Here lived Mr. Sandilands 
of Cruives, noted for his tall figure, and for the retinue 
of small dogs which accompanied him in his walks. 
A church now stands on the site of his house. 

On the S. side of Mr. Sandiland's house is the 
house and offices of Mr. Thomas Burnett of Kepple- 
stone, advocate, with a semicircular three-windowed 
projection towards the Denburn. 

The large house on the N. side of Mr. Sandiland's 
house is now occupied by the Deaf and Dumb Institu- 
tion, but at the date of the picture was the house of Mr. 
Menzies of Pitfodels, who endowed Blairs R.C. College. 




The building has since been turned into a Restaurant. 
Along the Union Street front of St. Nicholas 
Churchyard was a brick wall with a gateway in the 
centre, before it was replaced in 1830 by the present 
elegant facade. Old houses at the W. corner of St. 
Nicholas Lane and Correction Wynd, now replaced by 
the high back building of the Forsyth Hotel. 

2. — Objects visible in the Background — 

The Denburn valley N. of Union Bridge, between 
Union Terrace and the Gardens at the back of the 
houses in Belmont Street, along which the rivulet then 
ran as an open stream, over a series of low artificial 
cascades, bounded on the W. by public bleachgreens 
and a wooded bank about 50 feet high, and on the 



The Cotton Manufactory of Messrs. Gordon, 
Barron & Co., on the W. side of the N. end of Bel- 
mont Street, the site of the present three Free 
Churches, with the beautiful spire, designed by 
Archibald Simpson, and built in 1844. 

3. — More distant Objects visible in the 
Horizon of the Picture— 

S.E. part of the high ground of Hilton, North of 
Kittybrewster, and nearly two miles distant. 

Two high chimneys of a house which then stood 
at the corner of Schoolhill and Woolmanhill. 

The spire of Robert Gordon's Hospital, now Robert 
Gordon's College. 



204 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



The old spire, which had an oak frame covered by 
lead, on the top of Drum's Aisle, which is situated 
between the East and West Churches, as it appeared 
before it was burned down in 1874. It has since 
been replaced by the present granite spire. 

The S. side of the East Church, with four massive 
buttresses on the sides of the lower large windows. It 
was built in 1477- 1507 as the quire of the church of 
St. Nicholas. 

In the picture, Drum's Aisle, under the spire, is hid 
from view by a house (an inn with stabling), which 
stood walled off on the E. side of the Back Wynd, 
projecting into the W. side of the S. part of St. 
Nicholas Churchyard. The area occupied by these 
buildings, on their demolition in 1859, was added to 
the churchyard, and laid out in grass and flowers. 

Lofty tower on the top of the W. wing of Marischal 
College, on the E. side of the N. end of Broad Street, 
as it appeared before 1836, when the old buildings of 
the College were demolished, to give place to the pre- 
sent structure. The upper part of this tower was, at 
the cost of the Government, built in 1797 for an 
observatory in lieu of a small building used for a like 
object, which had, in 1783, been erected in connection 
with the College, on the Castlehill, on ground which 
the Town Council of Aberdeen presented to Govern- 
ment, on which to build Military Barracks. 

The two conical turrets on the top of what is now 
the Victoria Lodging House, on the W. side of the 
middle part of the Guestrow. This old house was 
the town house of the Skene family, was partly built 
in 1580 and partly in 1676. It was occupied for six 
weeks in 1746 by the Duke of Cumberland on his 
way to Culloden. 

A.C. 




Readg-Made Clothing 

*" OF 

SUPERIOR QUALITY, VERY CHEAP, 
(knei 1 of Br>oarJ j&i>eet ^allotogafce, 

Aberdeen. 



Boys' Ulsters, with Capes (Fit Boys 3 to 9 years), 

5/6, 7/6, 9/6, to 13/6 
Boys' Scarbro' Coats (Deep Cape all round, without 

Sleeves,) 7/6,9/6,12/6 

Boys' Overcoats, 3/11,5/6,7/6 

Boys' Reefers (Blue Nap), ... 3/1 1, 5/6, 7/6, 11/6 

Youths' Ulsters, with Capes (Fit Youth 9 to 16 years), 

9/6, 12/6, 15/6, to 21/- 

Youths' Scarbro' Coats, ... 13/6, 17/6, to 25/- 

Youths' Overcoats, 13/6,16/6,1025/- 

Youths' Reefers (Blue Nap), 10/6, 12/6, to 16/6 
Men's Ulsters, with Capes, 21/, 25/, 27/6, 30/, to 45/- 
Men's Scarbro' Coats, 27/6,35/- 

Men's Overcoats, in Miltons and Black and Fancy 

Worsteds, 15/6, 19/6, 21/, to 35/- 

Men's Reefers (Nap and Pilot), 11/6, 15/6, 17/6, to 25/- 



SPLENDID STOCK OF 

Pfl'S, YOUTHS', & BOYS' SUITS 

In Black Worsteds and all the Newest 
Shades in Tweeds. 

Boys' Suits, 3/1 1 to 12/6 

Youths' Suits, 13/6 to 27/6 

Men's Suits, 19/61045/- 



PARCELS SENT ON APPROBATION. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



205 



Bit Bulfc JSule Zftc. 



"Fatna day does Yeel begin? said ye, iaddie. 
"Weel, the first day o' Yeel's Tyesday come-a- 
week. It'll seen be time to be makin' ready for't, 
oot an' in." 

"Hoot, 'onian, ye're aye so furth-the-gate. Speak 
o' makin ' ready for Yeel mair nor aucht days 
afore it's here ! " 

"Weel, an' too lang'll tak you to provide yer Yeel 
strae? Nae doot the frost an' the skirlie o' snaw 
keeps ye oot o' the yird an' gies ye mair leisure ; 
but coontin' the threaves that ye hae'to beff yer leen 
maist, an' the time that it taks to dicht up the barn 
an' mak' a'thing snod, ye vvudna need to be owre 
aff-pittin'." 

The question had been put by myself, an impu- 
dent urchin just on the verffe of his teens, but not 
yet entered thereon, and the two responsible persons 
who spoke were my Aunt Martha and her bachelor 
brother, Peter, to whom she acted as housekeeper. A 
small tenant-farmer of the old-fashioned type, now 
extinct, who did the requisite ploughing and "ear- 
ing" on his holding of thirty odd acres with "a 
horse beast an' an owse," his own hand holding the 
plough, my uncle Peter knew well what it meant 
to provide the indispensable three days' "ford el" 
straw for Yule. For although my glowing forecast 
of the delights of the season might stimulate my 
zeal to help, as I could, to an exceptional extent, it 
was little I, his sole assistant, could do to accelerate 
the accomplishment of his task as he thumped away 
morning by morning on the thrashing floor of the 
wee barn with his solitary flail. 

"Ou, weel, 'oman, I daursay ye're nae sae far 
agley," said my uncle Peter. "We maun tak' in a 
ruckie the morn, an' we'se be duntin awa 's we can 
win at it." 

The two worthy souls were entirely at one in 
their ideas of what constituted a proper celebration 
of Yule. The author of "Tullochgorum," in the 
opening stanza of his description of the chief event 
in the Monymusk Christmas of his day, now con- 
siderably over a century ago, tells us there 

Has ne'er in a' this countra been 

Sic shouderin' an' sic fa'in' 
As happen't but few ouks sinsyne 

Here at the Christmas Ba'in'. 

And William Beattie, the heckler poet, who wrote 
fully half a century later, describes how at Yule- 
tide :— 

Buskit in my muslin cravat, 
My dooble blues, big coat, an' a' that, 
I took a step the length o' Daviot 
To see an aunt ; 



Yule being a time when, as a matter of course, 
hospitable country people 

had plenty 
0' roast an' boil'd an' a' thing dainty 
To feast their freens, 
and in addition gave themselves up to divers indoor 
and outdoor amusements. The Yule tide notions of 
my uncle and aunt, whose home was not far off the 
parish just mentioned, comprehended such modest 
yet hearty hospitalities as they could compass, 
including visitation of a few neighbours, and 
generally giving countenance co, if not taking part 
in directly promoting, the amusements of the 
time. These amusements ranged from the spinning 
of the "tottuni" for "preens," by the juveniles, to 
stiff nights at card-playing by some of the adults: 
and though the stakes, if any, in the latter case 
were far from heavy, the players somtimes got 
pretty deeply engrossed. For it was a recent tradi- 
tion of the time that Mains and his "boys" at one 
Yule time got so "inveterate" over the "cairts" 
that they played night and day all the time, hardly 
intermitting their play so long as to admit of 
"maetin' an' waterin' the beasts." And on the day 
after Yule, when Mains met the second horseman in 
the "closs" and put a plain question to him about 
his work, the chiel, whose mind still ran in the same 
groove, gave a "doited" stare, as if suddenly and 
unexpectedly wakened up, and simply answered — 
"Picks 'strumph!" And when Mains repeated his 
question in a sharper tone he said — "It's picks, I tell 
ye!" 

The Yule even at my Uncle Peter's saw a gather- 
ing of half a dozen or more, partly relatives, partly 
not, and chiefly youngsters, met, and grouped 
round the open hearth under the light of 
the crusie, to await their sowens. It was 
when he, worthy man, had gone out, booet in 
hand, and accompanied by a tail including the 
whole of the male part of his visitors, to "supper " 
and litter up his draught animals, and live stock 
generally, that the sowens were made ready and the 
table set. And what a socially cheerful gathering 
it was! My aunt's sowens, not "buttered," but well 
sweetened with treacle, were a dish fit for a king at 
any time. At Yule time the sowens, like other 
things, had their special significance ; and we all 
knew that the individual who, from whatever cause, 
did not finish the goodly bowlful set down before 
him or her was doomed to suffer from a "sair 
back" in hairst. Following the sowens came cakes 
of extra quality, with tempting kneevlicks of blue 
cheese from my aunt's best kebbuck, first taken 
from its shelf for the occasion ; and with a liberal 
supply of home-brewed ale in prime condition, and of 
unimpeachable quality, in so far as the honest use of 
honestly-produced malt was concerned, the repast 
was complete. 



206 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



In the blythely expectant hour or two that fol- 
fowed, there was no lack of seasonable enjoyment, 
from the utterance of sobered, backward -looking 
.sentiments amongst the seniors, grouped together 
by the ingle cheek, to the boisterous exclamations 
and rapid movements of the youngsters, with a free 
run of the house but-and-ben, as they played at 
•'glim glam" ; or more rarely, when some musically- 
gifted individual happened to be present, tried 
an extempore dance to the strains of his fiddle ; or 
anon put their heads literally together for conference 
in some suspiciously quiet interlude. At an hour 
considerably nearer midnight than our wonted bed- 
time, the house got cleared of visitors ; and as my 
aunt handed me a fir to light my way 
to bed in the midhouse, while she pre- 
pared to "rest the fire." either she or my 
uncle, founding on my customary habits, would offer 
the remark — "We'll see fa's nae sleepy heid at sax 
o'clock the morn's mornin', noo!" Little did they 
wot that next morning would find me "first up " for 
once; and not only that, but quietly afoot outside. 
For a plot had been laid on the previous night with 
a couple of cronies that it was we who by the grace 
of my uncle Peter should clamber up and take the 
goodly clyack sheaf off the couple baulks at the 
"strae" end of the barn, and thereafter share the 
privilege of doling it out in carefully-adjusted 
" ripps " among the live stock, from Nance, the 
elderly grey mare, to the youngest stirk in the byres 
as their first mouthful on the first day of Yule. 

Picture to yourself the three rustic nickums as 
they went about it all. talking to each animal as 
it got its portion as if to a familiar friend, if 
you care, good reader; and you will, perhaps, be 
disposed to smile at the thought of such prosaic- 
ally unsophisticated doings embodying the least 
atom of sentiment, or yielding the smallest 
particle of pleasure. For myself, I do not know 
that I could recall a single administrative act 
performed in the course of my life that was fitted 
to yield more genuine and wholesome enjoyment. 

My Uncle Peter was a man of essentially 
matter-of-fact and undemonstrative habits ; not 
devoid of intelligence nor given to superstitious 
beliefs. Only there was, as he held, no room to 
doubt of the cantrips performed by witches in the 
neighbourhood, at dates very far from remote ; as 
indeed there were those still here and there about 
within ken concerning whom it would not have 
done to say all that one had reason to believe 
concerning their attempts to exercise occult powers 
of a sinister kind. And as for fairies, it was no 
longer gone than the very season preceding that 
of which I write that, in pursuance of an old and 
odd fancy of theirs, the "gweed neighbours" had 
kept the millert from his sleep night after night by 
regularly starting to thresh in his barn on the 



back of midnight. And the thing went on till the 
millert, screwing up his courage, and incited by 
the hope of being able to lay held of the souple 
end as the flail swung round over some fairy 
thresher's head, so catching: "the speed," cun- 
ningly hid himself in the barn to wait his oppor- 
tunity, which at once brought the uncanny 
threshing to an end. 

But this is away from my subject, except in so 
far as it may enable the reader better to under- 
stand the precise standpoint from which men like 
my uncle would regard certain observances of Yule, 
Yule as a festival having really no direct religious 
significance to them. 

His morning duties in the stable and byres over, 
and his breakfast finished, my uncle's next care 
was t3 shave off his beard of two days' growth, 
and on completing his toilet there he stood fully 
arrayed in his "journey claes" with no more inten- 
tion of doing a single stroke of work during that 
and the next two days than if each of them had 
been a full Sunday. A man of sober life, as well 
as of industrious habits, he had, as he said, "nae 
skeel o' feastin'"; only there was the statutory 
annual visit of certain relatives who lived in the 
next parish ; for whom Aunt Martha must provide 
their Yule dinner. Then on the second and third 
days the millert's household and my uncle's inter- 
changed hospitalities by taking tea and spending 
the forenieht together in modest jollity, this night 
in my uncle's house, the next night in the 
millert's. 

The two outstanding "events" in the way of pub- 
lic entertainment were "the rowin' match" and "the 
sheetin' match." How well do I recollect both 
the one and the other; and what a notable com- 
bination of the utile with the dulee was to be 
found in each! In the rowin' match, which was 
open to all comers, and you might choose your 
own barrow, there was little room for trained skill. 
You just paid your tippence, and being securely 
blindfolded, set off to wheel your barrow as 
straight to the winning post, a hundred yards off, 
as you could. If a keen frost had bound the earth 
till it rang again under foot, all the better. In 
any case the match had to take place in as even a 
lea field as could be got, with no "howe furs," or 
other topographical lines to guide the competitors. 
And the fun to the groups of interested onlookers 
was found in the curiously eccentric zig-zagging 
of these same competitors, heightened by occasional 
collisions and the "wrastlin' " that followed before 
they and their barrows could again get clear of 
each other. But although the rowin' match 
yielded amusement sufficient for a matter of three 
or three and a half hours. it3 practical outcome 
was not usually of any great account. There 
might be prizes, a brass-mounted "fup," a "wyv'n 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



207 



bonnet," and a pair of " finger' t mittens," of the 
"lozen't" pattern ; or there might not ; but as the 
net drawings hardly ever amounted to ten shil- 
lings, there was not much to come and go upon in 
the way of spare balance for charitable application. 
The sheetin' match was an affair of greater 
exactitude and seriousness. Not that the exacti- 
tude was so v9ry comprehensive either ; for 
when the competitors were coming up it 
was easy to see that the conditions 
under which they were to shoot did not tie them 
down over-rigidly to any given pattern of weapon. 
The rifle, even in the muzzle-loading, un-modernised 
form then known, was not to be seen ; or, if seen in 
the hands of some outside landlouper, was pro- 
scribed, because constructed after a fashion that 
enabled it to project bullets with too great certainty 
to give common shooters a fair chance. And there 
they were, with all, sorts and sizes of flint-lock 
pieces. A huge specimen of the heaviest "Brown 
Bess " musket, owned by Saunders Kemp, which 
his uncle, who was an old Peninsular 
hero, had carried and operated with both 
at Badajoz and Waterloo, and with whieh- 
although "she" scattered badly, Saunders himself 
boasted of having killed "baith wild dyeucks an' 
craws" at a hundred yards distance, when he had 
"her" loaded "wi' maist a neivefu' o' swan shot,'.' 
was pretty sure to be in use in somebody's hands ; 
and there were others of less formidable size, but 
hardly less antiquated and time-worn aspect, side by 
side with the smartish-looking and well-kept fowl- 
ing-pieces to be seen in the hands of the young 
bucks who were in the habit of taking a quiet shot 
as they could at a mawkin or pairtrick. The target, 
framed of the upper-half of an old barn door, stood 
against the brae face in the field fronting the Inn ; 
and the feal-topped dyke which fenced off the field 
from the public road provided a choice of " reests" for 
the shooters. And how they did lay themselves along 
to their task. It was not thai windage, the state 



of the atmosphere, or any scientific niceties troubled 
them. The target was only a hundred and fifty 
yards off, and their good eyesight enabled them to 
get a perfectly clear grip of the staring bull's eye, 
as well as of the rings that surrounded it. But as 
this and the other shooter who had paid his six- 
pence and got loaded — mayhap with a ball, at the 
casting of which in a caums, brought into use for 
general convenience, he had assisted only a few 
minutes before — took a sight along the barrel of his 
piece, then set his feet afresh, and 
shitted the blue bonnet he had placed as the 
ultimate pad under his gun, a puzzling 
calculation as to the likely result of trigger-drawing 
under such a combination of skill with pure chance 
as was possible to him was apt to arise in his mind. 
But shoot somehow he must, and console himself 
with the thought that as no arms of precision were 
there his prospect of hitting the bull's eye must be 
nearly as good as that of .any other competitor. 

If a competitor went wide of the bull's eye, he 
might succeed in hitting the target somewhere. 
And if he did his position was a creditable one. 
For not nearly one half of the competitors accom- 
plished so much as that, even although most of 
them fired several shots. But what then ; were 
their sixpences not expended in a good cause? The 
prize might, and, as matter of fact, did, 
vary from a wag-at-the-wa' clock, or German silver 
watch, to a pair of Wellington boots or a wooden 
plough ; but whatever its form might be it was there 
in the interest of some poor mortal, who, if not 
either a laimeter or a beddal,was from some cause or 
other an object of charity, and so worthy to be the 
recipient of whatever margin there might be between 
the price paid for the prize, and the gross total of 
sixpences fired away in the winning of it. 

So went the Yuletide among "my ain folk" in 
the days long gone bye. W. A. 



We have already given portraits of Provost Brown 
and Mr. William Brown, and it was our intention to 
give those of the other members of the Firm ; but 
from one cause or another, we have been unable to do 
so. So far as we have been able to learn, there is 
no portrait of Mr. Forbes Frost extant. If however, 
any of our friends know of such a portrait, and will 
take the trouble to give us information on the subject, 
we shall be very much obliged. 



Our Christmas puzzle on page 185 may be solved 
by taking the first letter of the first line, the second 
letter of the second line, and so on. 



The publication of the first edition of "Chambers's 
Encyclopaedia," in 10 vols., extended over ten years 
(1859-1868). The present entirely new edition, of 
which we are promised the tenth and last volume in a 
few weeks, has been produced in half that period, 
the first volume having been issued in March, 1888. 
The present edition contains upwards of 30,000 
articles, 3,500 wood engravings, and 50 coloured 
maps. About 1,000 contributors, many of them 
being the most eminent authorities in every depart- 
ment of knowledge, have assisted in the preparation 
of the work. 



208 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Ghristmas Annuals. 



Chatterbox, Sunday, Bo-Peep, Little Folks, Rosebud 
Annual, Children's Friend, Prize, Infant's Magazine, 
Child's Companion, Bright Eyes, Old Corner Annual, 

All at Lowest Cash Prices at 

BROWN'S, ^ u T b I^en. 



New Spalding Club 
Publications. 



Vols. I. to VI. for Sale, Price £$. 



A. BROWN & CO., 

-H- 77 Union Street. 




Illustration from "Richard Tregellas. 



TWINE'" 



Variety of Colours and 
Qualities, 



3d., 6d., 8d., and 1/- per Ball. 



Suitable for Office or Library, Drawing Room or 
Warehouse. 



A. BROWN & CO., 

77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



We have just got a portrait of Tennyson on opal 
which is very suitable for presentation. It is done in 
two sizes, i/- and 2/. 

Tennyson's Works are going to have a good sale 
this Christmas — not so much his latest work just 
out, as the volume at 7/6, cash 5/8, containing all his 
poems up to the publication of "Demeter." 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



209 







Christmas comes but once a year — and a good job 
too. The long hours, extra work and worry — to say 
nothing of Christmas Cards — are enough to bring our 
grey hairs with sorrow to the grave. Nevertheless 
"a merry heart keeps on the windy side of care," and 
after Christmas is over the editor will proceed to 
enjoy himself. 




Our existence meantime, however, would be sweeter 
if we could induce our good friends to order their 
Xmas Cards early, instead of waiting till Xmas Eve, 
and expecting to have them printed while they wait. 
There are some who take time by the forelock, and 
get the benefit of a better choice of patterns than the 
late comers, and already several of our styles are sold 
out. Therefore come early. 



Another thing the prudent man orders early is his 
diary— not forgetting a nice ornamental kalendar. 
Take note, we have a stock of both. 



A new and cheaper edition of some of Ballantynes' 
earlier stories has just been published at 2/6, cash price 
1/11. It includes his best and most popular tales, 
as the following list will show. 

The Coral Island. A Tale of the Pacific. 

The World of Ice. Adventures in the Polar 

Regions. 
The Gorilla Hunters. A Tale of the Wilds of 

Africa. 
Martin Rattler. A Boy's Adventures in the 

Forests of Brazil. 
Ungava. A Tale of Esquimau Land 



The Young Fur-Traders ; or, Snowflakes and 

Sunbeams from the Far North. 
The Dog Crusoe and his Master. A Story of 

Adventure on the Western Prairies. 



Gavin Ogilvy, in The British Weekly, says — 
"Ballantyne was always delightful. . . . Though a 
dozen years at least have passed since I read any of his 
books, I could sit down to day and write out the story 
of nearly every one that had been written up to that 
time. . . . 'Ungava,' with its never-to be-for- 
gotten end of brave Dick Prince — how they all come 
back to one when he recalls his school-days ! Best of 
all (how solemnly we discussed which was best of all) 
was the 'The Coral Island.' No boy could be ex- 
pected to respect another boy who had not read 
Ballantyne's bewitching book 'The Coral Island.'" 



This testimony is backed up by Thomas B. Oldboy 
in Youth. He says — "A course of Ballantyne will 
be a part of a liberal education." 




Henty. 



The mantle of Ballantyne's early power has fallen 
now-a-days upon Henty, who leads by a long way, 
and with a long list in the race for popularity in Boy's 
Stories. "Beric the Briton, a tale of the Roman 
Invasion," his principal contribution to the books of 
this season, is in no way behind his former stories. 



2IO 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



WALTER SCOTT'S JJEW BOOKS & J4EW EDITIONS. 



Crown &vo, Cloth Elegant, Price %s. 6d. 
With Illustrations. 

THE NEW BORDER TALES, 

By SIR GEORGE DOUGLAS, Bart. 



The " New Border Tales," by Sir George Douglas, is a 
collection of charming stories of the Border Country, — stories 
dealing with the tragic, the supernatural, the fantastic, the 
homely, all of vivid interest and all impregnated with the 
atmosphere and sentiment of the historic Border-land in which 
their scenes are laid. 

NEW EDITION, IN NEW BINDING. 

Quarto, Cloth Elegant; Emblematic Design on Cover; 

Gilt Edges, 6 c May also be had in a variety 

of Fancy Bindings. 

THE 

MUSIC OF THE POETS: 

A MUSICIAN'S BIRTHDAY BOOK. 

Edited by Eleonore D'Esterre Keeling. 



In the new edition there are added about forty reproductions 
in fac-simile of autographs of distinguished singers and instru- 
mentalists, including Sarasate, Joachim, Sir Charles Halle, 
Paderewsky, Stavenhagen, Henschel, Trebelli, Miss Macintyre, 
Jean Gerardy, etc. 

NEW SERIES. 

Cloth Elegant, Large Croivn 8vo, Price 3-f. 6d. per vol. 

INTERNATIONAL HUMOUR. 

Each Volume will contain front 50 to 70 Illustrations and 
from 350 to 500 pages. 

VOLUMES NOW READY. 

Vol. 1. THE HUMOUR OF FRANCE. 
Vol. 11. THE HUMOUR OF GERMANY. 
Vol. hi. THE HUMOUR OF ITALY. 



Croivn Svo, Cloth, Price 2s. 6d. 
THE 

Quintessence of Ibsenism. 

By G. BERNARD SHAW. 

SELECTED TWO-VOLUME SETS OF POEMS. 

In New Brocade Binding. ^s. per set, in Shell Case 
to match. 



Scott (Lady of the 
1 Lake, etc.) 
Scott (Marmion, etc.) 

Burns (Songs). 
Burns (Poems). 



Byron (Don Juan, etc.) 
•* Byron (Miscellaneous.) 

Milton (Paradise Lost). 
4 Milton (Paradise Re- 
gained, etc.) 



Bijou Books, 6^/. each, Brocade Binding-, It. each 



SELECTED THREE-VOLUME SETS OF POEMS 

In New Brocade Binding, 6s. per set, in Shell Case 



to match. 
The following Sets can be obtained 



Poems of 



Wordsworth. 

Keats. 

Shelley. 

Longfellow. 

Whittier. 

Emerson. 

Hogg- 
Allan Ramsay. 
Scottish Minor Poems. 
Shakespeare. 
Ben Jonson. 
Marlowe. 

Sonnets of this Century 
Sonnets of Europe. 
American Sonnets. 



Heine. 

6 Goethe. 
Hugo. 
Coleridge. 

7 Southey. 
Cowper. 
Border Ballads. 

8 Jacobite Songs. 
Ossian. 
Cavalier Poets. 

9 Love Lyrics. 
Herrick. 

Etc., etc. 



THREE-VOLUME SETS OF PROSE WORKS. 

It. 6d. each. 3 in Shell Case, 4/6; Pedestal Case, $s. 
O. W. Holmes Series — 

O. W. Holmes' Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table. 
,, Professor at the Breakfast-Table. 

,, Poet at the Breakfast-Table. 

Landor Series — 

Landor's Imaginary Conversations. 

Pentameron. 

Pericles and Aspasia. 
Three Great English Essayists- 
Essays of Elia. 

Essays of Leigh Hunt. 

Essays of William Hazlitt. 
Three Great Classical Moralists — 

Meditations of Marcus Aurelius. 

Teaching of Epictetus. 

Morals of Seneca. 
Walden Series— 

Thoreau's Walden. 

Thoreau's Week. 

Thoreau's Selections. 
Famous Letters— Lowell Series- 

Letters of Byron. My Study Windows. 

Letters of Shelley. The English Poets. 

Letters of Burns. The Biglow Papers. 

NEW TWO-VOLUME SETS. 

Plain Cloth and Paper Case, 3^. Plain Cloth and 
Cloth Case, 3^. 6d. Brocade Binding, in Case, ^s. 
Roan Binding, in Case, 
Malory's History of King Arthur, 

Fairy Tales — English and Irish, 

Heine's Prose and Travel Sketches, 

White's Selborne and Miss Mitford's Our Village, 
Whitman's Specimen Days and Democratic Vistas, 



6s. 



2 vols. 



LONDON : WALTER 3C0TT, Ltd., 24 WARWICK LANE, PATERNOSTER ROW, 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



21 



3HATT0 & WINDUS'S TWO-SHILLING NOVELS, 



This is a selection only. Full Lists of 600 Novels free. 



ty GRANT ALLEN. 

Strange Stones I Philistia 
Babylon | In all Shades 

The Beckoning Hand 
For Maimie's Sake 
The Devil's Die 
This Mortal Coil 
The Tents of Shem 
The Great Taboo 

iy FRANK BARRETT. 

Fettered for Life 

The Sin of Olga Zassoulich 

Between Life and Death 

Folly Morrison | Honest Davie 

Lieut. Barnabas. 

A Prodigal's Progress 

John Ford ; and His Helpmate 

A Recoiling Vengeance 

Found Guilty 

For Love and Honour 

ly BESANT and RICE. 

This Son of Vulcan 

My Little Girl 

The Case of Mr. Lucraft 

The Golden Butterfly 

By Celia's Arbour 

The Monks of Thelema 

With Harp and Crown 

Ready-Money Mortiboy 

'Twas in Trafalgar's Bay 

The Seamy Side 

The Ten Years' Tenant 

The Chaplain of the Fleet 

ly WALTER BESANT. 

All Sorts and Conditions of Men 

The Captain's Room 

All in a Garden Fair 

Dorothy Forster 

Uncle Jack 

Children of Gideon 

The World Went Very Well Then 

Herr Paulus 

For Faith and Freedom 

To Call Her Mine 

The Bell of St. Paul's 

The Holy Rose 

!y BRET HARTE. 

An Heiress of Red Dog 
The Luck of Roaring Camp 
Californian Stories 
Gabriel Conroy 
Flip | Maruja 

A Phyllis of the Sierras 

y ROBERT BUCHANAN. 

The Shadow of the Sword 

A Child of Nature 

God and the Man 

Love me for Ever 

Foxglove Manor 

The Martyrdom of Madeline 

Annan Water 

The New Abelard | Matt. 

The Master of the Mine 

The Herr of Linne 



After Dark 

A Rogue's Life 

Basil 

The Dead Secret 



By HALL CAINE. 

The Shadow of a Crime 

A Son of Hagar | The Deemster 

By WILKIE COLLINS 

Armadale 

No Name 

Antonina 

Hide & Seek 

Queen of Hearts 

My Miscellanies 

The Woman in White 

The Moonstone I Man and Wife 

PoorMiss Finch | Miss or Mrs. ? 

The New Magdalen 

The Frozen Deep 

The Law and the Lady 

The Two Destinies 

The Haunted Hotel 

The Fallen Leaves 

Jezebel's Daughter 

The Black Robe 

Heart and Science 

"I Say No" I The Evil Genius 

Little Novels | Blind Love 

The Legacy of Cain 
By B M. CROKER. 

Pretty Miss Neville 

Diana Harrington 

A Bird of Passage 

Proper Pride 
By DICK DONOVAN. 

The Man-Hunter 

Caught at Last 

Tracked and Taken 

The Man from Manchester 

A Detective's Triumphs 

In the Grip of the Law 

Who Poisoned Hetty Duncan ? 
By CHARLES GIBBON. 

Robin Gray 

For Lack of Gold 

What will the World Say ? 

In Honour Bound 

In Love and War 

For the King 

Queen of the Meadow 

In Pastures Green 

A Heart's Problem 

The Dead Heart 

The Flowers of the Forest 

The Braes of Yarrow 

The Golden Shaft 

Of High Degree 

By Mead and Stream 

Heart's Delight 

Fancy Free I Loving a Dream 

Blood Money ] A Hard Knot 
By E. LYNN LINTON. 

Patricia Kemball 

The World Well Lost 

Under which Lord ? 

With a Silken Thread | lone 

"My Love !" 

Paston Carew 

The Atonement of Learn Dundas 

The Rebel of the Family 

Sowing the Wind 



By JUSTIN MCCARTHY. 

Dear Lady Disdain 

The Waterdale Neighbours 

My Enemy's Daughter 

A Fair Saxon | Linley Rochford 

Miss Misanthrope 

Donna Quixote 

The Comet of a Season 

Maid of Athens | Camiola 

By D. CHRISTIE MURRAY 

A Life's Atonement | Hearts 
Joseph's Coat I Val Strange 
A Model Father | Coals of Fire 
By the Gate of the Sea 
The Way of the World 
A Bit of Human Nature 
First Person Singular 
Cynic Fortune 
Old Blazer's Hero 

By OUIDA. 

Held in Bondage 

Strathmore 

Chandos | Idalia 

Under Two Flags 

Cecil Castlemaine's Gage 

Tricotrin Puck 

Folle Farine 

A Dog of Flanders 

Pascarel | Signa 

In a Winter City 



Ariadne 
Moths 
Friendship 
Pipistrello 



Bimbi 

In Maremma 

Wanda 

Frescoes 



Princess Napraxine 
Two Little Wooden Shoes 
A Village Commune 
Othmar Guilderoy 

Ruffino Syrlin 

Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos 

By JAMES PAYN. 

Lost Sir Massingberd 

A Perfect Treasure 

Bentinck's Tutor 

Murphy's Master 

A County Family 

At Her Mercy 

A Woman's Vengeance 

Cecil's Tryst 

The Clyffards of Clyffe 

The Family Scapegrace 

The Foster Brothers 

The Best of Husbands 

Found Dead | Halves 

Walter's Word 

Fallen Fortunes 

What He Cost Her 

Humorous Stories 

Gwendoline's Harvest 

Like Father, Like Son 

A Marine Residence 

Married Beneath Him 

Mirk Abbey 

Not Wooed, but Won 

^200 Reward 

Less Black than We're Painted 

By Proxy | High Spirits 



By James Pa.yn—Contd. 
Under One Roof 
Carlyon's Year 
A Confidential Agent 
Some Private Views 
A Grape from a Thorn 
From Exile I Kit: a Memory 
For Cash Only | Holiday Tasks 
The Canon's Ward 
The Talk of the Town 
Glow- Worm Tales 
The Mystery of Mirbridge 
The Burnt Million 
The Word and the Will 

By CHARLES READE 

Never too Late to Mend 
Hard Cash | Foul Play 
Peg Woffington 
Christie Johnstone 
Griffith Gaunt 
Put Yourself in His Place 
The Double Marriage 
Love me Little, Love me Long 
The Cloister and the Hearth 
The Course of True Love 
Autobiography of a Thief 
A Terrible Temptation 
The Wandering Heir 
A Simpleton | The Jilt 
A Woman-Hater 
Singleheart and Doubleface 
A Perilous Secret 
Readiana 

Good Stories of Men and other 
Animals 

By W. CLARK RUSSELL. 

Round the Galley Fire 

On the Fo'k'sle Head 

In the Middle Watch 

A Voyage to the Cape 

A Book for the Hammock 

An Ocean Tragedy 

The Mystery of the "Ocean 

Star" 
The Romance of Jenny Harlowe 
My Shipmate Louise 

By GEORGE R. SIMS. 

Rogues and Vagabonds 
The Ring o' Bells 
Mary Jane's Memoirs 
Mary Jane Married 
Tales of To-day 
Dramas of Life 
Tinkletop's Crime 
Zeph : A Circus Story 

By MARK TWAIN. 

Tom Sawyer | A Tramp Abroad 

The Stolen White Elephant 

Huckleberry Finn 

A Pleasure Trip on the Continent 

Life on the Mississippi 

The Prince and the Pauper 

By J. S. WINTER. 

Cavalry Life 
Regimental Legends 



LONDON: CHATTO & WINDUS, 214, PICCADILLY, W. 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



Now's the time to buy: 



by 



The Wrecker. By R. L. Stevenson. 4/6. 

Tess of the D'Urbervilles. By Thos. Hardy. 4/6. 

The Tales of the Borders. 2/8. 

The Guinea Stamp. By Annie S. Swan. 3/9 

Phil May's Annual. 1/. 

Pansy and Folly Bells. By Samuel Reid. 3/9. 

Days with Sir Roger de Coverley. Illustrated 

Hugh Thomson. 4/6. 
Beauties of Nature. By Sir John Lubbock. 4/6. 
The Little Minister. By J. M. Barrie. 4/6. 
A Window in Thrums. By J. M. Barrie. 4/6. 
Grania : The Story of an Island. By Emily 

Lawless. 4/6. 
Barrack Room Ballads. By 

Rudyard Kipling. 4/6. 
The Scapegoat. By Hall Caine. 

2/8. 
Beiic the Briton. By Henty. 4/6 
A Footnote to History. By R. 

L. Stevenson. 4/6. 
A Cigarette Maker's Romance. 

By Marion Crawford. 2/8. 
Fair to See. By Lockhart. 2/8. 
A Soldier's Children. By J. S. 

Winter. 2/8. 
The Pickwick Papers. By Dickens 
The American Claimant 



<M. ( Brown&@ 

77.U'nion.Street, 

gHberdeen. 



qos 



1/6. 

By Mark Twain. 2/8. 



Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow. By Jerome. 1/11. 

Armorel of Lyonesse. By Besant. 2/8. 

Pierre and Jean. By Maupassant. 2/8. 

Craigdam and its Ministers. By Walker. 6d. 

Notre Dame. By Hugo. 9d. 

Monte Cristo. By Dumas. 9d. 

The Buchanan Ballads. 9d. 

Anna Karenina. By Tolstoi. 2/8. 

The Humour of Italy. 2/8. 

The Humour of Germany. 2/8. 

The Humour of France. 2/8. 

The Naulahka. By Rudyard Kipling, 4/6. 

The Blue Pavilions. By Q. 4/6. 

The White Company. By Conan Doyle. 4/6. 

By Order of the Czar. By Hatton. 2/8. 

The Three Miss Kings. By Ada Cambridge. 2/8. 

Memoirs of a Mother-in-Law. By Sims. 2/8. 



In a Steamer Chair. By Luke Sharp. 2/8. 

Desperate Remedies. By T. Hardy. 2/8. 

Dr. Kidd of Aberdeen. By Stark. 3/. 

Tennyson's W 7 orks. 5/8. 

Beeton's Household Cookery. 5/8. 

Scotch Stories. By D. Grant, oxl. 

Kilmeny. By Wm. Black. 1/11. 

Our Humble Friends. By Gordon Stables. 2/8. 

Three Men in a Boat. By Jerome. 2/8. 

Diana of the Crossways. By Meredith. 2/8. 

East Lynne. By Mrs. W T ood. 2/8. 

Gully of Bluemansdyke. By Conan Doyle. 9d. 

Dagonet Ditties. By Sims. 9d. 

The Queen of Sheba. By Aldrich. 

9 d. 
Old Creole Days. By Cable. 9d. 
Madame Delphine. By Cable. 

9 d. 
Quintessence of Ibsenism. By 

Bernard Shaw. 1/11. 
Dante, Six Sermons. By W r ick- 

steed. 1/6. 
The Ayres of Studleigh. By 

Annie S. Swan. 1/6. 
m ^^■^^■^Sffl John Halifax, Gentleman. 3/9. 
Robert Falconer. By George MacDonald. 3/9. 
Alec Forbes of Howglen. By George MacDonald. 3/9 
Things Seen. By Hugo. 1/11. 
History of a Crime. By Hugo. 1/4. 
Wilhelm Meister. By Carlyle. 1/6. 
Waverley Novels. 1/11 per vol. 




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'- ,'Xo o>-? f *J:> /Xo o>?, -1- /Xo o>r. '. r V ,^<p 







L 



BROWN'S 



BOOK-STALL 



1893. 



A. Brown & Co., 
Booksellers and stationers, 
Aberdeen. 



INDEX. 



Page 
Aberdeen : its Literature, Bookmaking, and Circulating 


Notes (Continued)— 


Page 


149, 173. 


Art-ful, 


183 


Aberdeen Year Book, 1892, ... ... ... 71 


In your Ear, 


209 


Aberdoniana, .. 107, 141, 215 


Pen and Pencil, 


246 


A Bookworm's Content, ... ... ... 109 


Our Advertisers — 




A Book in Season, 253 


Mr. A. S. Cook, 


79 


Agriculture in Aberdeenshire in 1778, 29, 67, 89 


Mr. James Stephen, 


81 


An Hour in the Old World, 243 


Mr. D. C. Thomson, 


123 


A Lay on the Markets and New Gas Works, 137 


Mr. John Elrick, 


145 


A Rare Psalter, 83 


Our Contributors — 




Art in Aberdeen, ... ,,. ... ... 47 

A Story in Three Ads, ... ... ... ... 101 


Mr. George Walker, 
Public Libraries of Aberdeen, ... 


257 

167, 190 


Bibliomaniac's Prayer, ... ... ... ... 85 

Books Worth Buying, ... ... ...9, 43, 59, 103 


Some Academy Extras, ... 
That's the way of it, 


85 

i3S 

255 


Braif Blithe Toon 0' Aberdeen, 89 


The Convalescent, 


Brown's Aberdeen Book-Stall, 1, 17, 33, 49, 73, 93, 


The Green Lady's Ghost, 


22* 


113, 129, 149, 173, 201, 225 

Dusting Books, 143 

Getting up on Cold Mornings, 13 

Hirpletillim, 241 

Leaves from Parnassus, .. . ... ... 223,251 

Leigh Hunt on Catalogues, 109 


The Least of These, 164 

The Miller Explains, 217 

The Month's Biz, 211 

They didn't get in, 147 

This Month's Magazines, 11, 27, 45, 63, 87, 103, 123, 
139, 159, 194, 219 


Notes — 


This Year's Magazines, ... 


237 


Jottings, 15 


Wilson, G. W., 


49, 73 


Bait, 157 








Published at 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 


No. 13. JANUARY. 1893. 


Sfter Fifty gears' 



Sojourn in our present premises at No. 77, we are 
going to pack up our goods and chattels and remove 
to larger and better premises. We are therefore 
offering a number of articles at specially reduced 
prices to reduce stock before the removal. 



A. BROWN & CO., 

Booksellers and Stationers, 

Union Street, Aberdeen 



ELECTRO-PLATING. 



WILLIAM BAIN, 

The Northern Machine Warehouse, 
Principal Office— 9 BRIDGE STREET, Aberdeen 

BRANCH-12 GREAT WESTERN ROAD. 

Gihj Gvjcle ar\d Plating Works— 98 COLiLEQE STREET, arxd at NEWGASTLE. 



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^# ICiaeed Coats, (Capes, and Mantles. 

DANISH KID JACKETS. 

SURGICAL AND LAWN TENNIS GOODS. 

(Sla&stone an& other travelling Bags* 

HORSE LOIN, LORRY, AND STACK COVERS. 
JRUBBER J-10SE, MATS' AND' SHEEtlNQ, BELTINQ, "&c. 



*' 1 



FIND LAY & CO 

96 iS.nion |3treet, Aberdeen 




No. 13. 



JANUARY. 



1893. 



brown's Bberfceen Boofe^StalL 



No. XIII. 




"Among all the schools where the knowledge of 
mankind is to be acquired, I know none equal to that 
of a bookseller's shop. ... It would be an end- 
less task to set down the various and opposite articles 
wanted, and by the demand made, one gets a better 
idea of the wants of the world, than in any other way. 
He [the bookseller] comes in contact with enquiring 
minds in all grades of society, and his shop is the 
natural resort of cultured minds." 



HIS was the testimony of James 
Lackington the famous London 
bookseller, 1746-1816; who, by 
his enterprise, revolutionized 
the trade by purchasing the 
remaining copies of unsold books, which had 
been first published at a high price, and sell- 
ing them afterwards at a price which brought 
them within reach of the meanest condition 
and the lowest purse. He was the precursor 
of a most useful class of men for the 
publishers, relieving them of stocks of books 
which had become unsaleable at the high 
prices when they first appeared, and were 
considered as recherche as grapes and green 
peas in May, but by age had become as 
raisins or grey peas in January, yet retaining 
all their nutritive qualities to the enquiring 
mind. Previous to his day it had been the 
custom to destroy or burn one half or three- 
fourths of such books, and with this rule he 
complied for some time, but afterwards kept 
the whole stock, and sold them at reduced 



prices, creating quite a panic among the other 
booksellers. In cases like Dr. Samuel John- 
son, who, in his youth, had the run of a 
bookseller's shop, we see the wide and ripe 
scholar as the product, while as in Lackington's 
case, it produced the sharp, intelligent, and 
acute man of business, who took to his 
business, and worked it with brains, putting 
the essence of the books he dealt in, into his 
own mind, and thus proved himself an in- 
telligent and safe guide to his customers. 

During the long existence of the " Book- 
Stall," a numerous race of assistants received 
a training in it. Quite a host of names figure 
in its business books, and might be given. 
Many of them "come like shadows — so 
depart," are only names, sometimes not even 
that, but simply " the boy." And could their 
after careers be followed and described, 
volumes might be filled with the strange 
medley; several cases having considerable 
romance connected with them, which might 
worthily occupy the pen of a Smiles. To 
some old people still, it will be sufficient to 
name William Mortimer, William Laurie, 
David Wyllie, Joseph Philip, Alex. Leslie, 
John Kiloh, James Brownie, and James 
Strachan as citizens, who in a past generation 
trod the stage of Time here, and figured in 
the Aberdeen Directory. 

One family named Matthews furnished in 
succession three sons, who, educated in 
Gordon's Hospital, all became in succession 
head assistants, one of whom died while 
manager of the London Shipping Company ; 
while in 18 17, James Macray went into the 
service of Joseph Parker of Oxford ; from 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



WATERSTON'S 



DIARIES for ,8 



93 



Now 
Published. 



The Best Scotch Diaries. 

At all prices, suitable for the Pocket, the Desk, the Counting-Room, 

and the Warehouse. 



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Superior paper. 



Full Scotch information, complete to most 
recent date, including recent changes in 
Postal Rates, Census, Public Appointments, 
Parliamentary List, &c. 



MAY BE HAD FROM ALL BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS. 



GEORGE WATERSTON & SONS, 

EDINBURGH AND LONDON. 




Ranks First 



in Every Way. 



BY SPECIAL WARRANT MAKERS TO H.M. THE QUEEN. 
CONTRACTORS TO H.M. GOVERNMENT. 

The Type-lVriter Company, Ltd., 

2 2« Renfield Street, Glasgow. 

P. M. D URWARD, Manager. 

Aberdeen Agents— A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



that rose to be librarian of the celebrated 
Bodleian Library; and on Mr. Frost's death 
in 1845, he would fain have come back to 
fill the episcopal succession of the manager 
of the "Stall" had the partners been agree- 
able, which they were not. 

Fifty years connection with the firm afforded 
ample opportunities of studying the character 
of boys who served, and of finding out what 
proportion of them were drawn to the 
business by their own inclination and love of 
books, or were put into it by their parents, 
simply for the wages, or because they were 
getting old, and rebelled against any more 
schooling. The world's wicked maxim to 
"think every one a rogue until he proves 
himself to be honest," has always been re- 
pudiated by the writer in the very strongest 
manner. There are attractive faces, especially 
in the young, on which truth and honesty 
seem to be "writ" large, and there are faces 
wanting these features, which instinctively 
breed aversion. Given, a good nest, a fair 
heredity, an orthodox Scottish training — no 
matter of what creed — and an honest physio- 
gnomy, and as surely as the revolutionary 
French soldier carried a marshal's baton in 
his knapsack, that boy will rise to the top of 
his profession and will do good service to his 
employer all the while he is climbing. Found 
an applicant of this kind, an employer does 
well when he grapples him with hooks of 
steel, and binds him as an apprentice at once. 
Wanting in any of these points, prudence 
points out the propriety of first taking him on 
trial, and giving him a chance. Almost in- 
variably it will then be found that it is those 
taken on trial who give trouble, and it may 
be considered fortunate when the trial does 
not require to be long, whatever way it ends. 

Dismissing at once any notice of those 
waifs and straws who floated for a very short 
time on the "Book-Stall" streamlet, who 
were soon washed ashore, and whose dismissal 
enabled them to find their own place; and 
also of those, who, finding that they had 
booked on a wrong train, and who afterwards 
took another line which led them into more 
congenial yet honourable employment, in 
which they had an opportunity of expending 
and expanding their peculiar tendencies with 



good effect for themselves and the public ; 
old friends and customers may not object to 
the introduction of sketches of the career of 
one or two former assistants who may yet be 
remembered by some of them as obliging 
servants, and who cannot be forgotten by 
those whom they faithfully served. For is 
not history but the essence of innumerable 
biographies, and lessons may be learnt from 
even the simple annals of young lives. Dr. 
Johnson has said that "there was not a man 
in the street whose biography might not be 
made interesting, provided he could narrate 
something of his experiences of life, his trials, 
difficulties, successes and failures." And so 
also Carlyle says in his Life of Sterling : — 
"I have remarked that a true delineation of 
the smallest man and his scene of pilgrimage 
through life is capable of interesting the 
greatest man ; that all men are to an unspeak- 
able degree brothers, each man's life a strange 
emblem of every man's : and that human 
portraits faithfully drawn are of all pictures 
the welcomest on human walls." 

Amongst the assistants in the shop at Mr. 
Frost's death in 1845, was a young lad named 
John Cormack, connected with St. Andrew's 
Chapel; a protege of Mr. Frost's, and who had 
then been in his service for three years. As 
a bookseller he had been captured young — 
before the School Board came into being 
with its despotic sway — and both Mr. Frost 
and the present writer had to look after his 
education, which he took readily up. He 
was subjected in early life to severe tempta- 
tions, and when a crisis came, which was 
either the making or the marring of his future 
career, it was a pleasure to think, that with 
kindly treatment, it turned out to be the 
making. He became an excellent assistant, 
and a great favourite of all the customers. 
After a faithful service of twelve years, wish- 
ing to push his fortune, a place was found 
for him in Smith, Elder, & Co.'s large 
establishment in Cornhill, London. Before 
leaving in February, 1854, he was entertained 
at supper in the "Lemon Tree" by a company 
of forty friends who loved him, and customers 
whom he had served. He soon made his 
mark in London, got favourably acquainted 
with John Ruskin and Frederick Maurice, 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Campbell & Company, 

Successors to CAMPBELL, ACHNACH, & Co., 

INDIA RUBBER & WATERPROOF 
MANUFACTURERS, 

18 BRIDGE STEE1T, 
ABERDEEN, 

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W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers. 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberfceen. 



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77 UNION STREET 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



becoming an assistant in the Working Men's 
College. He then accepted an appointment 
in the P. &. O. Company's service, and was 
sent out by them to Shanghai, where his 
activity and intelligence got full scope. 
By collecting and sending home Chinese 
curios, by importing Wilson's Stereoscopic 
Views, and by securing an agency for the 
then new Aniline Dyes, which were all the 
fashion in China — the land of bright colours 
— he, in a few years made a fortune ; retired 
and came home, looking forward to his 
marriage and a life of well-earned ease. But 
man proposes, and God disposes ; it was not 
so to be. The writer met him in London on 
his arrival, received him at Aberdeen on a 
week's visit, when he went to his relations at 
Peterhead to settle down there. A few 
months elapsed, during which the young life 
fought a strong fight against the insidious 
enemy of life, who was then sapping and 
mining under the fair form — and then the 
writer stood by his graveside in deep grief 
and sorrow, from which he was painfully 
aroused by hearing the beautiful and affect- 
ing burial service of the Church of England 
so murdered and atrociously mangled by the 
clergyman hurrying it over in a manner so 
jarring to a sorrowing mind, that he has 
never forgotten nor forgiven it; another sorrow 
was added by this, to that of bereavement. 
Milton says that he who destroys a book is 
guilty of murder, and surely so is he who 
takes away and kills all the life and feeling 
from the "sure and certain hope of a blessed 
resurrection." 

But turning over a leaf and changing the 
subject, we select another case, in the narra- 
tion of which there is nothing but joy and 
congratulation. In May, 1862, the firm 
advertised for an assistant, and amongst 
numerous applicants, a single glance at each 
of whom was quite sufficient to tell them 
that they need not call again, there stepped 
into the "Stall" one day, a young lad, whose 
fair open countenance at once spoke volumes 
to any one who knew anything about physiog- 
nomy, and had an instinctive belief in it. 
As he still lives — in order to spare his blushes 
— we forbear description of the face, but that 



both nature and heredity had richly dowered 
him in this feature, the narrative will abund- 
antly prove, and for the same reason his 
name is with-held. Asking as to his residence, 
he said it was in the country, fully two miles 
away. When told that this was a fatal 
objection, inasmuch as he could hardly be 
expected to attend the opening of the shop 
at 7*30 a.m. "Oh, sir!" he said "you only 
try me ! if you say seven o'clock I shall be in 
time, for I rise every morning before six, 
and take a spell of work in the garden." 
The fair face, the frank speech, and the earn- 
est determination of the boy was irresistible, 
and the proprietor felt captured by the lad. 
But while so, prudently, and in order not to 
show this, he continued to urge all the 
objections he could think of regarding meal 
hours, etc. To all these, there were ready, 
instant answers, and in short it was quite 
clear that the boy's mind was set on the 
occupation and the place, and this being so, 
it was soon settled, and without any stipulations 
as to being on trial, he was accepted. He 
became a very valuable and trusted assistant, 
soon becoming a great favourite with all the 
frequenters of the "Book-Stall," and was a 
model in punctuality and civility, for with a 
smiling countenance, he was ever ready to 
oblige, and as years passed on, his services 
became ever increasingly valuable. 

Amongst old respected customers in these 
days, the late Colonel Fraser of Inverallochy 
and Castle Fraser, had long held an honoured 
place. The "Book-Stall" was always visited 
by him when he came to town, and he 
generally spent some considerable time in 
it, not on business alone. He appeared 
to notice the young assistant in an especial 
manner, and on one occasion making some 
purchases, particularly desired that he might 
be sent up to the Northern Club with 
them. On leaving them there, the waiter 
detained the lad, saying the Colonel wished 
to see him. He seemed to have made a 
favourable impression, and got a handsome 
gift as the messenger. Next time the Colonel 
came to Aberdeen he called, and noticed the 
lad so graciously, that it was quite enough to 
have turned his head, and had this been 
possible, to have made his employers jealous. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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AT ECONOMICAL PRICES. 



KENNETH MACLEAN & SON 

83 Iiambs Conduit Street, 

LONDON, w.c, 

17 BRIDqT STREET, 
Aberdeen. 



departments. 



Uniforms. 
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Ladies' Habits. 
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Jackets. 
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UR SCOTCH BRANCH being 
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and being in daily communication with our 
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Excellence of Fit and Latest LONDON 
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Brown's Book-Stall. 



The Colonel then stated that having some 
papers and books in confusion at Castle 
Fraser, he wished us to get some one who 
could arrange them for him, saying that it 
would not occupy more than a week at the 
utmost. We immediately offered to procure 
a clerk from an advocate's office, but he in- 
stantly said, " No, no, your lad there will be 
quite competent, and I will pay you for his 
services." And so it was arranged, the time 
for his service commencing very curiously 
on a Saturday evening. A first-class railway 
ticket was sent him. On his arrival at the 
station, the Colonel in his carriage was await- 
ing him, and for the next eight days, the lad 
lived in such a wealth of clover, as even no 
fairy story book could have adequately de- 
scribed. There was some sham of arranging of 
papers, a sort of confusion purposely confused, 
evidently to try the capacity of the lad, but 
which to one trained in the "Book-Stall," 
was so easy that it was set all right in an hour 
or two. After that, every day was one con- 
tinued round of pleasure, in which every- 
thing possible was contrived and done, in 
order to gratify the boy. The Colonel was 
his companion in carriage drives all round 
the country side, and all kinds of amuse- 
ments — provided they did not separate the 
two — were placed at his disposal. The frank, 
free, and truthful outspokenness of the boy, 
must have been a delightful study to all the 
members of the family, and their knowledge 
of natural philosophy must have been largely 
increased by contact with the young and 
fresh mind, brought so suddenly into such 
entirely different social surroundings and 
circumstances. At the conclusion of his 
week's work, he was most handsomely re- 
warded, and sent into Aberdeen, with strict 
injunctions, that every Saturday afternoon, he 
was to come out and spend the next day 
with the Colonel at his castle, for which a 
railway pass was provided to him. 

It says something for oatmeal, the Shorter 
Catechism, and the training at the "Book- 
Stall," that such a boy should have been 
turned out; a boy capable of affording a 
mental treat to an intellectual and highly 
cultured family, so far, and so highly removed 
in social position from the rustic class to 



which their greatly honoured guest belonged. 
We read of such things, but generally only in 
romance and fiction, and yet, here is one 
other illustration of the veritable saying, that 
"truth is stranger than fiction." 

If the Colonel was a physiognomist, as he 
must certainly have been, there was little 
peril to him in the experiment. It might be 
a mere freak of fancy, which, if unsuccessful, 
could easily be ended, but, if so, it was peril- 
ous indeed for the one experimented on, and 
in many cases might have led to disastrous 
results — unsettling, and making the victim 
discontented for life. But the Colonel's 
shrewdness was happily justified, and evidently 
he had read the human face divine, to some 
purpose. From the fiery trial, the lad em- 
erged without the smell of fire on him, or 
even the singeing of his garments, and he 
returned unharmed, as modest, gentle, and 
obedient to parents and masters as ever. 
The only difference on him was, that now, 
instead of taking a hard spell of physical 
work in the material home garden in the 
early morning, he choose the mental garden, 
and began a course of hard study. At Castle 
Fraser, he seemed to have acquired his first 
sight of the " Delectable Mountains," which, 
if not exactly those seen by Bunyan's 
"Pilgrim," were so rosy and fascinating, 
that they drew him on with an irresistible 
attraction. 

Here the story might appropriately end. 
Having fired the electric spark, and supplied 
the young mind with a high ideal, and a 
stimulous to exertion, which could not fail to 
be good seed, if only it was sown in good 
ground, the influence of the patron might 
have ceased, and he might have been con- 
tentedly pleased to look for the flower and 
the fruitage as the sure result of his beneficent 
work. And some philanthropists would have 
stopt at this stage. Had they not done what 
they could with their money ? as if money 
was the summum bonum of the life of an 
immortal soul. Colonel Fraser knew better. 
This was not by any means his first experi- 
ment in philanthrophy. For years past he 
had quietly experimented in this way, so 
secretly, that only the great day will reveal it. 
Although in this benevolent work, he did not 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



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let his right hand know what his left hand 
did, yet it was impossible that it should be 
hid. His family were quietly a airt and pairt" 
with him ; if he was the explorer and the 
discoverer of gold fields, they assayed the ore, 
and reported the result, generally confirmatory 
of his own shrewd prospecting ; and outsiders, 
like the present writer, only by persistent 
enquiry, came to the knowledge of the nuggets 
he had unearthed, and brought out, into 
honour and renown. Having lifted the boy 
into a higher atmosphere, he could yet con- 
descend to his level. He visited his home, 
saw the nest in which his protege was reared, 
enquired minutely into the circumstances of 
the family, and being satisfied, left substantial 
tokens of his good will and interest in the lad 
and his relatives. 

Next year, getting his holidays by desire at 
a particular time, he was taken to London as 
the guest of the kind Colonel, who afterwards 
expressed the great pleasure he had experi- 
enced in hearing and seeing the lad's rap- 
turous delight in the marvellous wonders he 
there saw under good guidance; and as a 
remembrance of this happy time, he showed 
a handsome watch and chain the Colonel 
had presented him with. 

The following year, in like manner, he was 
taken to Paris, and saw all the sights there 
under the most favourable circumstances, and 
at a time when trips to Paris were not so 
common as they now are. Sometime after 
this, the Colonel intimated to the writer that 
he was desirous to promote the boy's advance- 
ment in life, and could procure for him a 
confidential position in a large establishment, 
provided he was qualified as a facile reporter 
in shorthand, and begged that his indenture 
in the "Book-Stall" might be cancelled. 
And after the pros and cons had been dis- 
cussed in the boy's interest, this was done. 
He went on the staff of one of the newspapers 
as a reporter for a time, and has now for 
many years filled with credit, a highly re- 
sponsible position as a banker in one of our 
principal cities. 

The Pyramids may have forgot the names 
of their founders ; but the memory of Colonel 
Fraser will be lovingly remembered in the 
grateful hearts of several men now in high 



social position; will be handed down by 
them to the next generation, and recorded 
in print, will last as long as the English 
language. 



JBoofes Mortb Busing. 



THE editorial fiat has gone forth, and I am to 
discourse to you monthly on those folios, 
which may seem to me the most worthy of 
immortality. By way of further preface, I need only 
say, that my aim will be more to guide you to what is 
good, than to rail at what is otherwise ; not to break 
a butterfly on the wheel, but rather to select for notice 
only that which I consider deserving of such. 



Messrs. Walter Scott, Ltd., whose really artistic 
publications (for by no other name can I adequately 
designate the dainty volumes, which have from time 
to time been issued by them) are too well known to 
require detailed comment here, have just published 
The New Border 7 ales, by Sir George Douglas, Bart. 
Those of you who consider that Wilson's Tales of the 
Borders could not well be equalled, may consider that 
I go too far in saying that some of these stories are 
quite as good, if they do not surpass the best of those 
in the older work, but even at the risk of incurring 
your serious displeasure, I cannot but think that this 
is so. Sir George has gathered with a loving hand 
many of the legends of hidden treasure, " warnings," 
resurrectionists, wraiths, and other uncanny things 
which still linger, in spite of the vandalism and realism 
of the age, in the Land of the Teviots, and lovers of the 
romantic will find much to interest them in this elegant 
little volume. The illustrations, of which there are 
several, are particularly good, and the price — at Brown 
& Co.'s — is only 3/6, while I have no doubt that Mr. 
Smith will not object to toss you for the discount. 

ST. JACK. 



NOTE :— The Editor requests that copies of books for 
review in this column, as well as periodicals to be noticed 
in our "Month's Magazines'" page, be sent to J. G. R., 
Windermere House, 201 Albion Road, Stoke Newington, 
London, N. 

By learning, we seek to elevate ourselves above our 
fellows ; by philosophy, to console ourselves for the 
past and to fortify ourselves for the future ; by religion 
(as it is commonly practised), to make ourselves 
respectable in this world and comfortable in the world 
to come.— -Julian Hawthorne. 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



TRY. 



Littlejohrx & Sor\'s 

TEAS and WHISKIES 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 



get your Sewing Machine properly 

eaned and Repaired; and very seldom 

fail to get NEEDLES and PARTS for 



YOU WILL NEVER FAIL " 

= fai 

^^i^^ every kind of Sewing Machine from 

ANTHONY B. JONHSTON, 

16 CROWN STREET, ABERDEEN. 



Agent for The Wheeler & Wilson, The New Home, The Willcox & Gibbs, The 
Home Companion, The Wanzer, and other Sewing Machines. 

Agent for The Griswold and New Foster Knitting Machines. 

Agent for Schild's and Weldon's PAPER PATTERNS. 
Always in Stock a great variety of the newest Shapes for Ladies' and Children's Garments, 6d., 9d., & Is. each. 

Ladies, please remember that you can get any article printed for BRAID or 
CREWEL Work. Large variety of Patterns. 

Quilting, Tacking, Muring, Plaiting, ana. Machine: Stitching. 

Chief Agency for PULLARS' DYE WORKS, Perth. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



i i 



Zbis flhonWs /IDaoa3ines, 



January, 1893. 



IN the writing of these monthly notes on a few of 
the best of the various magazines and reviews 
to be had at Messrs. Brown & Co., I would 
direct the attention of those publishers who have sent, 
or may purpose sending copies of their periodicals for 
notice, as well as of readers generally, to the fact that 
it is impossible in the small space at our disposal to 
include all those received, but by confining our attention 
one month to, say, the Nineteenth Century, the English 
Illustrated Magazine , and the Idler, and the next to the 
New Review, the Theatre, and the Strand, we hope 
ere the year is again on the bud, to have given our 
readers a fairly good — more or less— idea of the nature 
of the literary fare they may hope to find in the ever- 
increasing multitude of magazines and reviews. 



The Quiver (6d. ) I don't know why, but I never 
see the Quiver, but what I seem to associate it with a 
Scotch Sunday ! The scantily furnished room, the 
stiff, high-backed, uncomfortable-looking chairs, the 
grim mantelpiece, with its two ornaments placed with 
mathematical precision, one at each end ; the spotless 
" crumcloth " that one is afraid to look at, and the 
huge table, with a ponderous Family Bible at one end, 
and of a verity, the Quiver at the other ! I cannot 
say why the sight of the familiar blue cover always 
brings this picture before me ; it is not the contents, 
for they are most entertaining, or the pictures, for they 
are really excellent, and — but that must be it, it's the 
texts that are too much for me. Yes, it certainly 
must be the texts. Since earliest infancy I have had 
an unfortunate weakness for texts, though you mightn't 
think so at first. 



Chums (id. weekly, 6d. monthly). I'm old now, and 
in the sere and yellow leaf, but I felt myself a boy 
once more when I picked up the January part of 
Chums the other day, and scanned its various attrac- 
tions. Do you long to know of ghosts and such like ? 
— then read "The Haunted House at Hoe," by E. 
E. Green. Are you athletically inclined ? — then 
peruse "Association Football" or "Public School 
Cricket in 1892," according as ye long to wield the 
willow or propel the ball. Have you aspirations to 
be a Nihilist — and what boy hasn't ? — here you may 
learn all about the manufacture of nitro-glycerine and 



dynamite. Have you a weakness for mysteries or 
stories with alliterative titles ? — both can be found in 
"The House of the Golden Flare," or "The Diver's 
Doom," or perhaps you dote on serials which tell of 
battles and " moral victories " — bless you, they are all 
here, not to mention a minor selection of murders, 
vendettas, Apaches, squaws, bloodhounds, trap-doors, 
mysterious caves, and all the other good things that 
are necessary to form an ideal boy's paper. 



Atalanta (6d.) The girls are well looked after 
now-a-days — I mean, of course, in a literary sense. 
In other respects the darlings are quite capable 
of looking after themselves. Fancy Robert Louis 
Stevenson sending from his island home, a story 
expressly for the benefit of the fair sex ! Yet it is so, 
and the opening chapters of the long promised " David 
Balfour" maybe found in Atalanta for January. You 
had better tell your best girl to subscribe at once, then 
if her Pa wants to know what the — that is to say, why 
you call so often — you can convince him of your 
thoroughly domesticated character, by explaining that 
you and Eliza — that is, you and Miss Jones are reading 
Atalanta together. No extra charge for this hint. 



The Idler (6d.) I always had a weakness for the 
Idler — probably there was a sort of affinity or relation- 
ship in the name, but at any rate, Jerome's periodical 
comes about as near my ideal magazine (by the way, 
why shouldn't /have an ideal paper as well as Stead ?), 
as an ordinary human editor could reasonably be 
expected to get. I hail with an extra special shout 
the advent of a new series of articles, on " Lions in 
their Dens, " contributed by that Prince of Interviewers, 
Raymond Blathwayt, who tells all about John Burns 
at Battersea, and the life the Labour Leader lives 
there. 



The Picture Magazine (6d.) This is the very latest 
venture on the crowded seas of magazinedom, but the 
fact that it is published by Mr. Newnes, is sufficient 
guarantee that it will float, when others less favoured 
would speedily disappear from mortal ken. The 
contents are composed entirely of reproductions of 
pictures — all sorts and conditions of them, but the 
preface holds out promise of the introduction, at an 
early date, of a number of original drawings under a 
novel scheme, which ought to still further increase the 
popularity of this rather novel and interesting experi- 
ment. May it prosper is the benediction of 

ST. JACK. 



i2 Brown's Book-Stall. 




BY APPOINTMENT IN ORDINARY ^M^^W^i TO THE QUEEN. 

John Blaikie & Sons, 

^Bra3ters, ^BBell ano ;j©rass JBloun&ere, 

PkQMBERS, GRSFITTERg, COPPERSMITHS, & e . 

Manufacturers of IVer\j Description of Brass ar\d Gopper Work 
for Distillers, BreWers, Engineers, plumbers, Sc, 

LITTLEJOHN STREET METAL WORKS, 



AND 



218 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 



use 



All who Prize the Best Teas should 

Adams' Gelebrated Blends, 

Combining the Finest Pure, Young Grown Teas. The most Anti-Tanic in 
character, and deliciously refreshing in the cup. 

1/6, 1/8, 2/-, and 2/4 per lb. 

PURE GOLDEN TIPS, YOUNG TEA BUDS, 3/- pep lb. 

Contains the Cream and Essence of Tea, and is classed as the Finest the World 

produces. Free tasting Samples on application, or Six lb. Carriage 

Paid to any address. Terms Cash. 

64 GREEN, ABERDEEN. 




JOHN ADAMS, 



Sign of the Golden Tea Pot. y Established 1858. 



Parcel Post Boxes, raade of w f 00d ' T t " s ' ^T and Light> 

1 from id. to I/- each. 

A. BROWN & CO., J7 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



13 




(Setting up on Colfc flDorninos. 



N Italian author — Giulio Cordara, a Jesuit — 
has written a poem upon insects, which he 
begins by insisting, that those troublesome 
and abominable little animals were created 
for our annoyance, and that they were certainly not 
inhabitants of Paradise. We of the north may dispute 
this piece of theology ; but on the other hand, it is 
as clear as the snow on the house-tops, that Adam 
was not under the necessity of shaving ; and that 
when Eve walked out of her delicious bower, she did 
not step upon ice three inches thick. 

Some people say it is a very easy thing to get up of 
a cold morning. You have only, they tell you, to take 
the resolution ; and the thing is done. This may be 
very true ; just as a boy at school has only to take a 
flogging, and the thing is over. But we have not at 
all made up our minds upon it ; and we find it a very 
pleasant exercise to discuss the matter, candidly, 
before we get up. This, at least, is not idling, though 
it may be lying. It affords an excellent answer to 
those who ask how lying in bed can be indulged in 
by a reasoning being, — a rational creature. How ? 
Why, with the argument calmly at work in one's 
head, and the clothes over one's shoulder. Oh — it is 
a fine way of spending a sensible, impartial half-hour. 

If these people would be more charitable they 
would get on with their argument better. But they 
are apt to reason so ill, and to assert so dogmatically, 
that one could wish to have them stand round one's 
bed, of a bitter morning, and lie before their faces. 
They ought to hear both sides of the bed, the inside 
and out. If they cannot entertain themselves with 
their own thoughts for half-an-hour or so, it is not the 
fault of those who can. 

Candid inquiries into one's decumbency, besides the 
greater or less privileges to be allowed a man in 
proportion to his ability of keeping early hours, the 
work given his faculties, etc., will at least concede 
their due merits to such representations as the follow- 
ing. In the first place, says the injured but calm 
appealer, I have been warm all night, and find my 
system in a state perfectly suitable to a warm-blooded 
animal. To get out of this state into the cold, besides 
the inharmonious and uncritical abruptness of the 
transition, is so unnatural to such a creature, that the 
poets, refining upon the tortures of the damned, make 



one of their greatest agonies consist in being suddenly 
transported from heat to cold, — from fire to ice. They 
are "haled "out of their "beds," says Milton, by 
"harpy-footed furies," — fellows who come to call 
them. On my first movement towards the anticipation 
of getting up I find that such parts of the sheets and 
bolster as are exposed to the air of the room are 
stone-cold. On opening my eyes, the first thing that 
meets them is my own breath rolling forth, as if in the 
open air, like smoke out of a chimney. Think of this 
symptom. Then I turn my eyes sideways and see the 
window all frozen over. Think of that. Then the 
servant comes in. "It is very cold this morning, is it 
not?" — "Very cold sir." — "Very cold indeed, isn't 
it ? " — " Very cold indeed, sir." — " More than usually 
so, isn't it, even for this weather?" (Here the 
servant's wit and good-nature are put to a considerable 
test, and the inquirer lies on thorns for the answer). 
"Why, sir . . . I think it is." (Good creature! 
There is not a better or more truth-telling servant 
going). " I must rise, however — get me some warm 
water." — Here comes a fine interval between the 
departure of the servant and the arrival of the hot 
water ; during which, of course, it is of " no use ? " to 
get up. The hot water comes. "Is it quite hot ? " — 
"Yes, sir. — "Perhaps too hot for shaving: I must 
wait a little?" — "No sir; it will just do." (There 
is an over-nice propriety sometimes, an officious zeal 
of virtue, a little troublesome). "Oh — the shirt — 
you must air my clean shirt ; — linen gets very damp 
this weather." — "Yes, sir." Here another delicious 
five minutes. A knock at the door. " Oh, the shirt 
— very well. My stockings — I think the stockings 
had better be aired too." — "Very well, sir." — Here 
another interval. At length everything is ready, 
except myself. I now, continues our incumbent (a 
happy word, by-the-bye, for a country vicar) — I now 
cannot help thinking a good deal — who can ? — upon 
the unnecessary and villainous custom of shaving : it 
is a thing so unmanly (here I nestle closer) — so 
effeminate (here I recoil from an unlucky step into 
the colder part of the bed). — No wonder that the 
Queen of France took part with the rebels against 
that degenerate King, her husband, who first affronted 
her smooth visage with a face like her own. The 
Emperor Julian never showed the luxuriancy of his 
genius to better advantage than in reviving the 
flowing beard. Look at Cardinal Bembo's picture — 
at Michael Angelo's — at Titian's — at Shakespeare's — 
at Fletcher's — at Spenser's — at Chaucer's — at Alfred's 
— at Plato's — I could name a great man for every tick 



14 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



BROWN'S 

NOTED 



«£« ^M »▼■» "*-^ c&k Mtt *X* «5^ AM Ml AM *? A AM ^M 

•jw*jw»j**l»*l*wiwwiwwp ~i w •!• w i w •!• •!• •" 

* 

4* 
4. 

4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4. 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4» 
4. 
4* 
4* 
4* 



4. 
4* 
4» 
4. 
4* 
* 
4» 

* 

* 

* 

4. 

4» 

4* 
4»4»4»4»4»4»4»4»4»4»4»4»4»4» 




PACK 

PLAYING GARDS. 

77 UNION STREET, 

,<* ABERDEEN. », 



J -^ tj - ,J ^ 



ft CLUB VELLUM 

JslOTEfAPER ^j^ 



A BROWN &CO 

STATIONERS, 

77. Union Street, ABERDEEN. 



^IMM^ffi 



he Point # # 

to keep in view is that you get the 
best possible value in Stationery 
and Books from A. Brown & Co., 
77 Union Street, Aberdeen, who 
keep a large and varied stock in 
both departments. 



46 Market Street, 
Aberdeen, 

f Q. \ (Opposite the 
Post-Office). 




Tailor, 
Clothier 



AND 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



*5 



of my watch. — Look at the Turks, a grave and otiose 
people. — Think of Haroun Al Raschid and Bed- 
ridden Hassan.— Think of Wortley Montague, the 
worthy son of his mother, above the prejudice of his 
time. — Look at the Persian gentlemen, whom one is 
ashamed of meeting about the suburbs, their dress 
and appearance are so much finer than our own. — 
Lastly, think of the razor itself — how totally opposed 
to every sensation of bed — how cold, how edgy, how 
hard ! how utterly different from anything like the 
warm and circling amplitude, which 

" Sweetly recommends itself 
Unto our gentle senses." 

Add to this, benumbed fingers, which may help you 
to cut yourself, a quivering body, a frozen towel, and 
a ewer full of ice ; and he that says there is nothing 
to oppose in all this, only shows that he has no merit 
in opposing it. 

Thomson the poet, who exclaims in his "Seasons" — 
" Falsely luxurious ! Will not man awake? " 
used to lie in bed till noon, because he said he had no 
motive in getting up. He could imagine the good of 
rising ; but then he could also imagine the good of 
lying still ; and his exclamation, it must be allowed, 
was made upon summer-time, not winter. We must 
proportion the argument to the individual character. 
A money-getter may be drawn out of his bed by three 
or four pence ; but this will not suffice for a student. 
A proud man may say, " What shall I think of myself, 
if I don't get up ? " but the more humble one will be 
content to waive this prodigious notion of himself, out 
of respect to his kindly bed. The mechanical man 
shall get up without any ado at all ; and so shall the 
barometer. An ingenious Her in bed will find hard 
matter of discussion even on the score of health and 
longevity. He will ask us for our proofs and pre- 
cedents of the ill effects of lying later in cold weather ; 
and sophisticate much on the advantages of an even 
temperature of body ; of the natural propensity (pretty 
universal) to have one's way ; and of the animals that 
roll themselves up and sleep all the winter. As to 
longevity, he will ask whether the longest is of neces- 
sity the best ; and whether Holborn is the handsomest 
street in London. 



We have for sale, second-hand, the following 
library magazines -.—English Magazine ', Contemporary, 
Fortnightly, Com hill, Scribner, London Society, 
Strand, 




As the time of the editor of " Brown's Book-Stall " 
will be considerably taken up for some time, first with 
planning and then with carrying out the alterations on 
the premises to which we are about to remove, he has 
accepted the services of a London correspondent who 
will contribute a monthly article on the current maga- 
zines, and on any books which may engage his fancy. 

Though trade in general in Aberdeen has been pretty 
quiet lately, something has been done in the literary 
line. Mrs. Dr. Rodger has published a book on 
"Aberdeen Doctors at Home and Abroad" — a book 
which ought to be of interest to Aberdonians generally, 
both at home and abroad. The cash price is 8/. 



We hope it will have as good a sale as the Rev. 
Mr. Stark's recently published "Life of Dr. Kidd,"an 
interesting local book which has run out of print in a 
very short time. 

Another Aberdeen Minister — the Rev. Wm. Mac- 
Gregor — has come out as a successful author. His 
booklet (i/, cash 9d. ), "So great Salvation, "is having 
a very good sale. 



We observe by the daily papers that Mr. R. L. 
Stevenson is very ill. We hope that this is simply an 
effort of an imaginative reporter, and that Mr. Steven- 
son will live to give us many more Memories, Portraits, 
and Adventurous Tales. A new book of his, contain- 
ing three stories — " The Bottle Imp," " The Beach of 
Falesa," and "The Isle of Voices" is announced for 
next month. Two of these titles suggest tales of the 
South seas, and raise hopes that they may equal in 
interest that most entertaining story of wreck and 
adventure among the Isles — "The Wrecker." 



" Ideals of Life taken from Literature" (5/, cash 3/9). 
Under this title the Rev. J. Vickery, some time minister 
in Aberdeen, has published a volume of Sermons- 
discourses to young men and women. We have not 
yet read the volume, but if it be as good as the literary 
lectureswhich he used to deliver in Blackfriar's Church, 
it will be well worth reading. 



i6 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Teacher's Bibles 

OXFORD 6- LONDON EDITIONS, 

In a Variety of Different Sizes and Bindings, 

From 2/6 upwards. 




The Smallest Bible in the World, from 3/6, 
The Finger New Testament, from 2/, 
The Finger Prayer-Books, from 2/, 

Are Marvels of Production, both as to Printing and Binding. 

POCKET BIBLES, from 1/- to 31/6. 
PEW BIBLES, Very Large Print, 3/6, 6/, and 10/. 




Prayer Books, 



With Hymns 

A. and M.. 



In One Volume, or Two Volumes in Case. 



Prayer Books, 

With Scotch Communion Office, 

1/, 1/3, 1/6, 2/6, & 3/6. 
A. BROWN & CO., 

7 J Union Street, Aberdeen, 




Cash Boxes, 




1/, 2/, 3/6, 4/6, and 5/6. 

STRONG AND WELL FINISHED. 

A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 

Established 1870. 

Gordon & Watt, 

Decorative Ipainters & Qlass |3tainet*s. 

QJ7 iainecl ancL Opnamenial drlass Iaeaclecl Wopk fop Ecclesiastical op 
LJ9j Domestic Pupjposes; Memopial Windows, Bwapj^ Scpeens, Doop 
Panels, &e. , die. , apristieall^ anci ej^eetivel}? exeeutecL 

ESTIMATES AND DESIGNS ON APPLICATION. 

DESIGNS entrusted to them by Architects will be carefully carried out. 

PAINTED POTTERY AND OTHER WARE FIRED. 

|Rclicf (jpecoratitot ^Hatcrtals in Tynecaslle Canvas, Lincrusta-Walton, Anaglypta, 

Japanese, and other Wall Hangings of the Best Manufacture. 




39 WOOLMANHILL I II I 25 BLACKFRIARS STREET 

"^X ABERDEEN. K^x. 






Tnr, 2-ol,^*,,- M frtro TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: 

Telephone No. 553. Established) 1878. "Stephens, Gilders, 

===z— =— ^ Aberdeen." 

3-ames Stephen & Sons, 

CH^VE^S, GIDDE^S, 

Fine J^rt publisher 1 ? and Ipfyty Coloumen, 
48, 49, & 5o WOOLMANHILL 

(OPPOSITE ROYAL INFIRMARY), 

«^>c ABERDEEN.^ 

WORKS: RODGER'S WALK, JOHN STREET. 

jPameS J^tepbetl & M*0l\B have just opened a LARGE SALOON above 
their present Shop, where they have every accommodation for showing a large assort- 
ment of Goods, including Artists' Proof Etchings, Prints, Oil Paintings, Water 
Colours, and Mirrors of every description. 



ENQLISH QOLjD FRAMES made for ev?ervj style of picture. 
OAK FRAMES and QOLD SLIPS for Etchings, Engravings, and fhotographs. 

OLD FRAMES RE-GILT, MIRROR FRAMES RE-GILT, CORNICES RE-GILT. 

Men sent out to hang Pictures to all parts of the Country. 




STEREOSCOPES. 



The new and improved HAND STEREOSCOPE, 

costing, with One Dozen Slides, 12/, is equal in effect 
to the most expensive. 



STEREOSCOPIC SLIDES.— Consisting of some of 

the Choicest Bits of Scenery of Scotland, England, 

and Ireland. 



Only Address: 48, 49 & 50 W00It|BflflfllMt, ABERDEEN- 




No. 14. 



Pub lis J t ed at jj Union Street, Aberdeen. 



FEBRUARY. 



1893. 



In view of our. 



Approackir\g Removal, 




E are clearing out a large amount of stock at Greatly Reduced 
Prices. Among other lines we are offering the following : — 

About 1000 Volumes of General Literature at Half Price and under. 

Several Hundred Novels at Half Price. 

Over 100 Bibles at Half Price. 

A number of Children's Picture Books at Half Price and under. 

300 Children's Story Books at Half Price. 

2000 Penny Pencils at 6^d. per dozen. 

150 Etchings — usual price 1/6, now offered at 1/. 



A. BROWN & CO., 

77 Ufitbn Street, Aberdeen. 



ELECTRO-PLATING. 



WILLIAM BAIN, 

The Northern Machine Warehouse, 
Principal Office— 9 BRIDGE STREET, Aberdeen. 

BRANCH-12 GREAT WESTERN ROAD. 
Gity Gvjcle arxd Plating Works— 98 GObbEQE STREET, and at NEWCASTLE. 



FIlFPTftOMphHTH^P in SILVER and NICKEL, by fully experienced Platers, carefully 

__I * and promptly executed in Household Plate, Cycles, &c. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. BRING A TRIAL ORDER. 



rVPT FS — Tne onl y Warehouse for a Large Selection. 

SEWING MACHINES.— Finest hand machines. 

KNITTING MACHINES. PERAMBULATORS. MAIL CARTS. MANGLES. WRINGERS. 

parts for all cycles and sewing machines. 

Repairs, Enamelling and Electro-Plating 




Waterproof 

^4 *8Emeed Coats, Capes, and Mantles. 

DANISH KID JACKETS. 

SURGICAL AND LAWN TENNIS GOODS. 

Gladstone anfc other travelling Bags* 

HORSE LOIN, LORRY, AND STACK COVERS. 

PUBBER J-IOSE, MATS AND SHLTTINQ, BELTINQ, &c. 



FINDLAY & CO., 

96 iflnion |3treet, Aberdeen. 




No. 14. 



FEBRUARY. 



1893. 



Brown's Hberfceen Soofe»StalL 



No. XIV. 



The world's a stage ! each mortal acts thereon, 
As well the king that glitters on the throne 
As needy beggars ; heaven spectator is, 
And marks who acteth well, and who amiss. 
What part befits me best, I cannot tell : 
It matters not how mean, so acted well. 

Francis Quarks, 1 590- 1 644. 




A f 



FTER narrating some inci- 
dents in the career of 
two assistants ; one hav- 
ing a short and busy period of 
work, with the long rest of the 
grave speedily reached ; the 
other fitted for longer service; 
surrounded, sheltered, and ad- 
vanced by powerful friends, and 
so with correspondingly in- 
creased responsibilities and 
multiplied opportunities of ser- 
vice ; let us give some slight 
details of the stormy experiences of a third, 
in which there is such a wonderful spice of 
piquant romance, that it might have been 
expanded into three volumes 8vo. Dickens 
would have revelled in the delineation of 
some of the characters ; Black would have 
found a Princess, and Blackmore a Lorna 
Doom in it ; and Payne, Doyle, or Besant 
would have paid handsomely for a sketch of 
the incidents of the story, which, as occurring 
at the time it did, will appear to some almost 
incredible. 



But valuable as the story may be, and " all 
rights being reserved," as the phrase runs, the 
writer chooses to take his old friends into his 
confidence, and tells something which actually 
occurred. For here, in plain prose, and 
without any poetical exaggeration, taken from 
printed documents — " the Condescendence, 
Statements of Fact, Answers, and Revises 
printed for the Court of Session " — here is a 
story narrated, which, as showing what may 
be attempted to be done in this nineteenth 
century, and in a Christianized city like 
Aberdeen, may, and should at least make us 
blush for human nature, even when sorely 
tried. 



When a new partner became necessary, it 
was the lot of the writer to be chosen by the 
proprietors of the Book-Stall as the successor 
of the episcopal Mr Frost, and, of course, he 
succeeded to all the effects, influences, and 
customers of the place. Having already 
served for twelve years there, he was con- 
versant with all the customers, meeting them 
not only in the shop, but many of them at the 
hospitable table of Mr Frost; who had this 
peculiarity, that all his irritable temper was 
expended on the youngest apprentice, while, 
if he could stand that, and, if in spite of it he 
rose to be head assistant, then he could do 
no wrong, and was made more of than he 
deserved. Partly, then, owing to Mr Frost's 
favour, and partly to family connections, the 
writer was freely admitted into the inner 
circles of Episcopalian society, and what a 
revelation it was to him ! 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



19 



As Dean Ramsay relates, in the beginning 
of this century, the " chapel folks " were a 
people by themselves ; by their creed and 
practice, they were isolated from their 
neighbours, and if on hospitable thoughts 
intent, they gave an entertainment, it was 
spoken of by invited bigotted Presbyterians 
as just " chapel folks' kail." On their forms 
of worship, they might be as touchy as a 
hedgehog ; on the necessity of the three orders 
they were as firm as their native granite ; and 
the Scottish supply of clergymen falling short 
of the requirements, the then numerously 
imported English licentiates, who, in the first 
fiery fervour of Puseyite enthusiasm, crowded 
into Scotland to convert the savage Presby- 
terians; and were sometimes far too rashly 
received there, only added flame to the fuel 
already ablaze, and they out-heroded Herod 
in their unbridled zeal. Mr Frost was 
mercifully removed from the evils to come, 
for his ideas of Christian duty in the payment 
of accounts for necessary purchases would 
have received a very rude shock from the 
conduct of some of these Apostolical 
Successionists. 

Amongst native Episcopalians, true sons of 
the soil, perhaps, the most learned and the 
most devoted follower of sincere conviction, 
and the truest representative of the traditions 
of his Church, was the Rev. Patrick Cheyne, 
of St. John's. Bishop W. Skinner was 
universally admitted to be a human being, 
mixing freely with his fellow mortals, and 
sharing in their joys and sorrows, their cares 
and trials. But Mr Cheyne stood somewhat 
apart from ordinary work-a-day humanity ; he 
took little interest in mundane matters, but 
was every inch of him a divine, with his eyes 
fixed on things beyond this mortal life. The 
writer believes that in common with other 
fellow mortals he ate and drank, but the only 
trait of humanity he met with in him was, 
that sometimes in solitary walks and retired 
places he met him smoking, and was pained 
to see that then he carefully tried to conceal 
the habit. Of all in office in the Scottish 
Episcopalian Church in his closing days, 
perhaps, he stood out as the most learned, 
firmest, and truest representative of the old 
traditions of his Church. 



It was by his recommendations that a 
young man, who had already served some 
time in a bookselling establishment, was 
accepted as an assistant. He proved himself 
competent, became a good salesman, and 
soon after his appointment it was noticed that 
a number of young ladies, understood to be 
members of the Church Choir with which he 
was connected, began to frequent the shop, 
always contriving to see and be served at the 
counter by him. 

Twelve months or so after his engagement, 
having been sent to the bank with the 
drawings of the day, on his return he showed 
a parcel of notes which he had found on the 
pavement opposite the Bank, and on looking 
at them there were found five ^20 notes 
folded together, evidently just as received 
from the Bank. They were so very old, 
worn, and dirty, that it was no wonder 
although Sydney Smith said that " he never 
knew the meaning of the words filthy lucre 
until he saw Scotch Bank Notes." Inquiry 
was immediately made at the bank if any 
large sums of money had been given out that 
day, as " a large sum had been found," and 
the reply was that no sums of that kind had 
been given out that day. 

The money was banked, and, although the 
find was advertised for many weeks after, no 
claimant ever appeared. It was a curious 
circumstance that it was never claimed, 
although advertised then and long after. 

Some considerable time elapsed, when the 
principal of the " Book-Stall " was sent for 
one day by an Advocate in town, who said 
that his natural daughter, then eighteen years 
of age and a member of the same choir as 
the assistant, had in her possession some 
small books and trinkets which had evidently 
been received from our assistant, and that 
these coming from the " Book -Stall," he 
said he had no doubt but that we were 
being robbed by him, and begged that if 
this could be substantiated, a charge of 
theft might be lodged against him immedi- 
ately. Enquiry was promised and instantly 
made ; and the result being that finding that 
the articles were duly paid for, this was com- 
municated to the Advocate, very evidently 
to his great chagrin. 



20 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



21 



This naturally led to enquiry on the writer's 
part, with the result of eliciting the following 
facts, all as afterwards dep07ied to. The two 
young people had for a long time past been 
attached to each other, and were said to be 
then engaged. But, in consequence of some 
ecclesiastical disputes arising in the congre- 
gation of which they and their relations were 
members, in which the girl's father and the 
assistant had taken opposite sides, the former 
had taken deep offence at the assistant ; had 
forbidden any intercourse between the two 
young people • and, finding that notwith- 
standing his commands, the intercourse still 
continued, the daughter was locked up, and, 
on her effects being examined, the presents 
already mentioned were discovered, and hence 
the interview, while the daughter was strictly 
guarded in durance vile. 

Matters continued so for a time, the girl 
declining to come under any pledge of 
discontinuing the intercourse. But, as is 
well known, "love laughs at locksmiths." 
Boys' daring and girls' wit conjoined may be 
safely pitted against any bolts, coupled with 
even the most lynx-eyed watchfulness. 

Means of correspondence were easily 
contrived. By means of a thread let down 
from her attic on high, a cord was drawn up, 
and by means of a cord there might have 
been a rope ladder. At any rate, there were 
letters passed, and intimation was given that 
on a certain morning she would fly from her 
home, and she claimed some help to enable 
her to reach Edinburgh, to which place she 
meant to fly. All this was accomplished, 
and the empty cage was the first and only 
announcement to the relatives that their 
bird was flown, taking nothing with her from 
her father's house but the clothes she was 
then wearing. 

The girl was already far on her way to 
Edinburgh when her flight was discovered. 
The rage of her relatives may be imagined, 
but cannot be described. Having very 
shrewd suspicions that she must have been 
assisted in her escape by one individual well 
known to them, they speedily called at his 
house, but all their efforts to get any 
information regarding their relative were 
quite fruitless, the lad declining to answer 



any question. Failing in this quarter, the 
present writer was sent for, and then, and for 
the first time, he was made acquainted with 
a partial account of the circumstances which 
had occurred, having to guess at the 
remainder. He was ordered imperatively, on 
the pain of the highest displeasure of the 
Advocate, to question the assistant, and, in 
case of his refusal to divulge full information, 
to dismiss him at once. 

The writer said he had no objections to 
question his assistant, and to impart any 
information he might thus acquire ; but, in 
case of his refusal to answer, he firmly 
declined to dismiss the lad at once, without 
knowing much more than had been now, and 
for the first time, made known to him. The 
Advocate — well known to be one of the most 
vindictive men in Aberdeen, and not to be 
trifled with — uttered dire threats of vengeance, 
which did not in the slightest alter the 
resolution of the writer, and which as a 
recompense for his conscientious firmness, 
when attempted to be carried out in acts 
afterwards, turned out to be the greatest 
benefits he could have conferred. 

Failing to get his revenge thus carried out, 
the Advocate that same day lodged a charge 
with the Procurator-Fiscal, charging the 
assistant with " aiding and abetting" his 
daughter, "and being art and part in her 
carrying away her clothes, my properly" 
This very absurd charge was never intended 
to be tried; it was the merest blind, concocted 
for a purpose which speedily came to light. 
Late at night, and when there was no 
likelihood of bail being procurable, the lad 
was seized by the police, and, refusing to 
answer any questions other than those 
relating to the charge, he was locked up in 
prison for the night. 

The reason for his imprisonment came to 
light next morning. An emissary was in 
waiting for the Union Street postman, and 
asked him if he had a letter for the " Book- 
Stall " assistant, receiving for reply, that if he 
had, he certainly would only deliver it at the 
proper address ; that it might be called for 
there, but he could not deliver it elsewhere, 
or to any other person. Threats of being 
reported for insolence, only made him more 



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23 



firm in his refusal. The Advocate was him- 
self also on the watch to intercept the 
postman of the district in which the lad 
resided, and on his showing a letter addressed 
to the lad, the Advocate seized it, saying he 
" would see to the delivery of it." 

The letter was from the young lady, 
conveying the intelligence that she had 
reached Edinburgh safely. She refrained 
from giving her address, but desired a letter 
from her correspondent. This was enough 
for the Advocate, who immediately desired 
the Procurator-Fiscal to liberate the lad, 
which, strange to say, was done without any 
explanation being given to him. Perhaps, it 
would have been better if he had declined 
this liberation, and demanded to be tried on 
the charge. 

The Advocate went off instantly to 
Edinburgh, and, getting the aid of detectives, 
the girl was seized on calling at the Post- 
Office for her expected letter, and, by false 
representations as to her lover betraying and 
giving her up, was induced to return to 
Aberdeen, where in her father's house she 
was again confined, and guarded more 
strictly than before. 

Readers will naturally ask if such conduct 
as this was possible in Aberdeen. A member 
of the Society of Advocates stealing a letter, 
the property of, or in the custody of the 
Postmaster-General, and, either by himself, 
or in collusion, incarcerating a person in the 
common prison for the night, in order to 
carry out his schemes of vengeance. It was 
indeed a pretty kettle of fish, with some 
troublesome bones for some people in it. 
Of course, such a vindictive man had made 
enemies ; of course, also, his clever and 
talented daughter had made friends; and 
their sympathies, as well as those of the 
friends of the young man, were instantly 
aroused. " If things like this can be done 
here with impunity, the land is not worth 
living in ; it is simply intolerable," they said. 
And so quite a crowd of citizens of both 
sexes came forward to the rescue, like the 
brave knights and ladies of old. Canny and 
prudent Scotchmen and Scotchwomen, 
knowing full well that law was a two-edged 
weapon, yet took instant action, and put the 



case into the hands of the best legal advisers. 

A memorial to the Postmaster-General 
was forwarded, and another to the Lord 
Advocate, regarding the stealing of the letter. 
Enquiry was duly made, and it would have 
gone hard with the Advocate, but that the 
postman was induced to confess having given 
the letter, which brought the punishment on 
him, and the receiver pleading the feelings of 
a parent, and adding " Peccavi," and, being 
backed up by powerful interest, the 
authorities declined to prosecute. 

But, undeterred by failure in this case, 
which, if heard, would have certainly brought 
out the whole circumstances, an action in 
the Court of Session, claiming substantial 
damages, was instituted. The summons was 
issued, precognitions were taken, the Record 
adjusted and printed, and everything was 
ready for the hearing, when, frightened by 
the certain exposure, an offer of a modified 
sum for damages and expenses was tendered 
and accepted, because, on the part of those 
more immediately concerned, there were no 
vindictive feelings. 

But these feelings were not reciprocated. 
During the course of this action, the 
persecutors of the lad had got word of his 
find of ^100 in bank notes, many months 
previous, and the aid of the Queen's 
Remembrancer was now invoked to carry out 
the peculiar and almost unique British law 
on the subject. That law gives to the 
Crown, money, coin, or plate, if hidden in 
the earth or any private place, the owner of 
which is not known. But in this case, the 
notes (representing money) were not hidden, 
but were found lying open and exposed to 
all and sundry, in which case, and if 

I advertised, the law does not seem to apply. 
It did not apply in England at least when 
Joe Grimaldi, the celebrated clown, found a 
sum of about .£250 in notes, and advertising 
it without any owner being discovered, was 
allowed to retain it. 

Some very unwise steps were taken by the 

I authorities, as the case was actually brought 
up in the Police Court, and the writer was 

\ attempted to be conjoined with the finder. 
But John Smith, the respected President of 



24 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



25 



the Society of Advocates, and his agent, Dr 
Grub, soon showed that the Police Court was 
not the place for such a trial, and got 
expenses; which was perhaps all that was 
wished, with the view of reducing or 
exhausting the sum found. 

It was understood that the case was 
afterwards settled by the finder being 
allowed to retain a share of the sum. 

On the daughter's return to Aberdeen and 
renewed incarceration, finding out the real 
state of matters and how she had been 
deceived, she told her father that she would 
escape from his custody as soon as she could, 
and he, finding it impossible to alter her 
resolution, dismissed and discarded her, 
allowing her to retain her wearing apparel, 
his property. She went back to Edinburgh, 
where she soon got a good situation as 
governess, and gave great satisfaction. 

The trials of the young man were not over — 
by no means — more are known, and might 



be mentioned — but desiring to escape from 
further persecution, he took a situation in 
the South, and a few years after was married 
to the brave girl who, in proof of her con- 
stancy, had suffered so much for him. 

If one half of the world does not know 
how the other half live, as little do they know 
how they act ; and the romances taking place 
around them. " Ay, ay," said Scott, speaking 
of Melrose, " if one could look into the heart 
of that little cluster of cottages, no fear but 
you would find materials enow for tragedy as 
well as comedy. I undertake to say there is 
some real romance going on down there, that, 
if it could have justice done to it, would be 
well worth all the fiction that was ever spun 
out of human brains." And as Carlyle 
says — " Could the reader take an Asmodeus- 
flighr, and waving open all roofs and privacies," 
and all hearts and motives, what a world 
would be seen ! 



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26 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Brown's Book- Stall. 



27 



Uhis flBontb's flftacfasmes. 



February, 1893. 




EFORE I commence this month's chronicle, 
I feel that I owe an explanation and, 
perhaps, an apology to some readers of 
the Book-Stall. Not a few persons seem 
to have taken this column as a huge joke, and not as 
a carefully thought-out criticism of the leading 
periodicals of the day. To such I have only to say 
how sincerely sorry I am to have been guilty of saying 
anything which might, on the slightest pretext, be 
considered funny, and that it will now be my aim in 
life to make these notes as solemn as a Free Kirk 
sermon of the most orthodox old style. 



The New Review {if.) Mr. Archibald Grove, who, 
by the way, is the sitting member for South West 
Ham, which he won from the Enemy at the General 
Election, is evidently, like his fellow Editor, Mr. 
Knowles of the Nineteenth Century, a strong believer 
in names. Lords and Ladies, Novelists, Dramatists, 
Archdeacons, and even M.P.'s, all combine to make 
the February New one of the most interesting of this 
month's Magazines. There is, perhaps, no article 
which will arouse so much interest as Dr Wallace's 
Revolt against Home Rule (which nobody who could 
read between the lines took seriously) in the January 
number, but from Lady Jeune's defence of Crinolines 
to " Ouida's " disquisition on " The New Priesthood," 
there is not a single contribution which will not 
commend itself to the taste of the general reader. 



The Quiver (6d.) Messrs Cassell & Co. evidently 
consider that I am in need of spiritual reform — 
though you, who know me, know better ! — for they 
have again sent me a copy of this most excellent 
periodical, which I have duly admired and placed 
among my most treasured treasures. Meantime, I 
will only say that this month's number contains some 
very interesting matter, not entirely of a spiritual 
character, but nicely blended so as to suit alike the 
taste of both saint and sinner. In fact, the Editor 
of a certain comic paper confided to me the other day, 
under, of course, the most solemn pledge of secrecy, 
that he was not above reading the Quiver himself o' 
Sunday, which spoke volumes for the careful training 
of that same young man. 



Winters Magazine (6d.) When I'm asked by any 
of my learned lady friends in Bon-Accord what I 
would advise them to read, I know they are pining 
for me to recommend The Young Ladies' Novelette, 
but I, keeping in mind their high-class education, 
invariably suggest the National Review or Scottish 
Notes and Queries. But when an ordinary individual, 
who can darn stockings and cook a decent dinner, 
makes the same enquiry, I unhesitatingly recommend 
Winter's Magazine. I cannot enumerate all the good 
things in this periodical, but Mrs. Stannard's now 
famous article on "Death in our Skirts," and a 
supplementary one by the same writer on "Crinolisation 
or Civilization," will be of especial interest to the fair 
ones who are interested in this vexed question. 



The Strand Magazine. To the Editor of this very 
popular periodical I have to make a profound 
obeisance in a characteristic Japanese attitude, inas- 
much as I ought to have included a notice of the 
Strand in this column last month. But better late 
than never, as ye ancient proverb says, and ye ancient 
proverb is doubtless right. The new volume, which 
has just commenced, contains all the features which 
made its predecessors so successful, including the 
famous " Sherlock Holmes'" stories, and, in addition, 
promises a series of articles, " From behind the 
Speaker's Chair," dealing with matters parliamentary. 
These are written by Mr. H. W. Lucy, whose 
"Pictures in Parliament" are sending up the 
circulation of the Daily Nexus by leaps and bounds 
just now, and are illustrated by Mr. F. C. Gould, 
who contributes daily a number of sketches to 
"Observer's" political notes in the new green 'un — 
the Westminster Review. By the way, I may just 
add that the Library Copy of the Strand may be had 
from Brown & Co. a month old at half-price. Now, 
don't all call at once, my good readers, as our 
accommodation, after all, is but limited. 

ST. JACK. 



A Correspondent in the South wants copies of 
Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, of Brown's Book-Stall. We will, 
therefore, be obliged if any one having spare copies 
will report them to the People's Journal Office, 
Stirling. 



28 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



JEflJi HITTER'S LOOK 



A True Story of Aberdeen Fifty Years Ago ; 
# introducing many well-known Local Characters 
_ and Incidents of By-gone Days, 



IS NOW APPEARING IN TH 



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For INTERESTING REMINISCENCES of 



HEflRY 



TATtftOT '^ e Eminent Aberdeen Tragedian, 

' see the WEEKLY NEWS eve f R riday. 



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Established 1858. 




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29 



The State of Agriculture in 
Aberdeenshire in 1778. 



From " Present State of Husbandry in Scotland, 
Edinburgh, 1 784. 



This county is happily situated for conveniency of 
export and import, with abundance of commodious 
harbours, of which Aberdeen, Peterhead, and Fraser- 
burgh, possess the best. Agriculture, manufactures, 
and trade, agree here most cordially in supporting one 
another ; and all of them are supported by roads of 
communication, lately perfected, from the remotest 
parts of the county to every market town, and to 
every sea-port. Can there be contrived a situation 
more advantageous for husbandry ? Beside these 
important articles, population goes on apace. The 
inhabitants are sober and industrious ; and the follow- 
ing particulars will show that wages and provisions 
are moderate. The wages paid to labourers, in 
remote parts, are from 5d. to jd. per day ; at Aber- 
deen, 9d. in winter, and I2d. in summer. The 
women are so well employed in knitting stockings, as 
scarce to undertake field work even at 6d. Beef gives 
2|d. a pound, and mutton, 3d. Dutch weight. In the 
spring, beef and mutton rise to 33d., 4d., and 43d. 
per pound, there being little or no early grass in the 
county. A pound of butter, of 28 ounces, can be had 
for yd., and cheese, poultry, and meal in proportion. 
There is limestone in the county, but not hitherto 
found in sufficient plenty. There is sea-weed on the 
coast from Peterhead to Banff, and abundance of sea- 
shells thrown upon land by the sea in little hills, 
particularly at Fraserburgh, and along the adjacent 
coast. It grieved me to see some ignorant farmers 
repairing the high roads with these shells, a very bad 
stuff for a high road, and a loss of manure to them- 
selves. They have indeed no coal but what is im- 
ported. Peats they have in plenty ; but they are too 
remote from many places to be a cheap firing. 

The amazing increase of manufactures at Aberdeen, 
and consequently of trade, have added greatly to the 
number of its inhabitants. I am well authorised to 
say, that, in Old and New Aberdeen, including the 
houses between them, and the suburbs extending to 
the bridges over the rivers of Dee and Don, there 
are at least 25,000 people, old and young. The 
number of horses and cows have increased in propor- 
tion, which have added to the demand for grass, and 



also to the demand for hay, corn, and vegetables. 
Prosperity in trade and manufactures has ripsned a 
plan for improving the harbour, that 40 years ago 
would have been despaired of. It will cost, indeed, 
about ,£20,000 ; but the money is laid out at home, 
and the harbour will be a safe refuge in all weathers, 
which it was far from being formerly. 

The exports are oat meal, salmon pickled for the 
London market, and salted for exportation, stockings, 
and sewing thread. Imports are, wool, flax, oil, 
articles chiefly consumed in the manufactures of 
stockings and thread. It is very happy where the 
manufactures of a county are grafted upon its product. 
This may sooner or later be the case of Aberdeenshire, 
with respect to its manufacture of thread, though 
hitherto a large proportion of flax used for that manu- 
facture is imported. But it never can be the case of 
the manufacture of stockings ; the wool proper for 
that manufacture being imported from the south of 
England, as no proper wool grows at home. And 
yet, were the county highly improved and warmed by 
inclosing, so as to feed sheep that carry a fleece fit for 
combing, wool might be procured at home to lessen 
at least part of the import. To show the extent of 
the stocking manufacture, I am credibly informed, 
that, in the currency of a year, wool shipped at the 
port of London for Aberdeen, was insured to the 
value of £40,000. 

I delight to mention a considerable brewery for 
making porter, erected chiefly with a patriotic view. 
This brewery was erected to give vent to their own 
bear and barley, and to save great sums remmitted 
annually to London for porter. This brewery meets 
with great encouragement, and it is the great boast of 
the citizens, that they can now rejoice over their own 
porter, instead of bringing it from London. 

There is perhaps no place in the world where a 
spirit for husbandry has made such a figure as about 
Aberdeen. A corner between the sea and the rivers 
Dee and Don, has for many years been cultivated in 
the most skilful manner by a mixture of the garden 
and field crops, one year cabbage, next year barley, 
one year turnip or potatoes, next year oats, and so 
alternately, a mode of cropping unknown anywhere 
else in Scotland. But, that spot excepted, the town 
of Aberdeen was on all hands surrounded with a dry, 
barren, and stony muir, close to the very houses. 
Here the spirit of the inhabitants for husbandry, or 
perhaps to have country villas, was conspicuous. It 
might appear vain to think of improving that soil for 
profit ; but the citizens, prone to bestow that way any 



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money they could spare, fell to work, and persevered 
without regarding the expence. From ^"20 to £25 
per acre was not sufficient to deter them. And now 
the fields about Aberdeen, to the distance of three or 
four miles, carry as rich crops as are to be seen any- 
where in Britain ; which inclines me to think, that the 
land here, although full of stones, when the stones are 
carried oft", must be naturally rich. Upon the whole, 
considering the solidity of the improvement, I am not 
certain that the citizens of Aberdeen could have be- 
stowed their superfluous money more profitably. 

I shall confine myself to a single instance of im- 
proving the barren land about the town of Aberdeen, 
and that is the operations of Adam Duff, Esq ; late 
provost, which may be held up as an example to all 
around him. He feued from the town 150 acres, as 
stony and barren as any in the neighbourhood. The 
former examples of improvement made him give 3s. 
per acre of feu-duty, though at the time not worth one 
penny per acre. All the surface stones were first 
carried off to the places lined out for the fences. The 
next operation was trenching with spade and mattock, 
to the depth of from 20 to 24 inches, in order to 
remove all impediments to ploughing. The small 
stones, unfit for a wall, were thrown into the bottom 
of the trench as a drain to carry off water from the 
surface. The superfluous small stones were carried off 
for making roads. This operation, including blasting 
with gun-powder and expence of tools, cost £6 
Sterling per acre. The expence of ploughing, harrow- 
ing, forming ridges, making open drains, and building 
dikes, cost near ^"12 Sterling more. Manure carried 
from Aberdeen, consisting of dung and rubbish of old 
houses, cost little less than £8 Sterling. So that the 
improvement of a single acre amounted to little less 
than £25 Sterling before the ground was prepared for 
a crop. The first crop was turnip broadcast, well 
hand -hoed, which sold for £6 per acre to the people 
of Aberdeen, they being at the expence of taking up 
and of carriage. The second crop bear or bigg, £8 
Sterling the acre. The third crop clover. The first two 
years hay ; and then let out for pasture at a yearly 
rent, from 33s. to 38s. per acre. The poverty of the 
country, as to grass, is the cause of this high rent. 
The grass-seeds sowed were 12 pounds red clover, 6 
of white, 4 of ribwort, and 3 bushels ryegrass. 
In my opinion, a less quantity of ryegrass would 
have done better, supposing the seed to be good. 
Considering the original condition of this farm, the 
change in so short a time into fine pasture grass 



appeared to me amazing. Mr Duff led me to see two 
fields upon which he had begun two operations, and 
proceeded in them precisely as in the field now 
described. After seven years pasture, these two fields 
were broken up last year with oats, and the crops were 
excellent. Pease also are sown here in large quantities 
than are usual in other parts of the country. The 
land here, when free from stones, is, in the proper 
sense, a virgin earth, never formerly cropped, and 
which appears by experience to be extremely prolific. 
Lime produces wonderful effects upon such a soil, and 
I recommended it to the provost with all my might. 
Feeding oxen at the stall with turnip and hay, and 
rearing young cattle, is Mr. Duff's present operation, 
chiefly for increasing the dunghill. Were it not for 
that reason, he would find more immediate profit in 
selling his turnip to the people of Aberdeen, as also 
his hay, which gives commonly from 6d. to yd. per 
stone, of 20 pounds Amsterdam, and in this dry year 
gives iod. The stone fences here are capital, as are 
all those around that were lately reared. Those near 
the town are far inferior, being the first that were rear- 
ed when there was little skill in rearing such fences. 
But near the town there is little need of good fences, 
as the fields are never pastured, the common rotation 
being turnip, cabbage, kail, potatoes, barley, or oats 
with red clover seed for cutting green. A demand 
for these from the town is constant. How the town 
could subsist before these improvements began, with 
any degree of comfort, is not easy to say. But now, 
after enjoying the sweets of such husbandry, it is very 
easy to say, that, to be deprived of them, would be 
deplorable. There are many feus about the town of 
Aberdeen, consisting originally of the ground I have 
described, that give in rent now from 35 to 40 shillings 
per acre. The immense demand for vegetables and 
hay is what supports this rent. 

Chambers's 

Encyclopaedia 

is now completed. 

We can supply it in the following styles : — 
Cloth, ... £315 1 \- Morocco, ... 5 12 6 
^-Calf, ... 512 6 U- Morocco, Extra, 6 7 6 



A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street. 



32 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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18 Back Wynd, Aberdeen. 



All the Styles of BOOKBINDING carefully and well done. 

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When competition compels us to make a 
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Complete Arrangements for conducting 
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Telephone No. 553. ]65tabli0beb 1878. "Stephens, Gilders, 

_ Aberdeen." 

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fdiWXCe J^tepbCn & M>OW& have just opened a LARGE SALOON above 
their present Shop, where they have every accommodation for showing a large assort- 
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Colours, and Mirrors of every description. 



ENQLISH QOLD FRAMES made for ev>ery style of picture. 
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costing, with One Dozen Slides, 12/, is equal in effect 

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MARCH. 



1893. 



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MARCH. 



1893. 



Browne Bberfceen 3Booft*5tall, 



No. XV. 



" According to metaphysical creed, 

To the earliest books that children read, 

For much good or much bad they are debtors. 
But before with their ABC they start, 
There are things in morals as well as art 
That play a very important part,— 

' Impressions before the letters.' 
Dame Education begins the pile, 
Mayhap in the graceful Corinthian Style — 

But alas ! for the elevation : 
If the lady's maid, or gossip, the nurse, 
With a load of rubbish, or something worse, 

Have made a rotten foundation." 



UST as a plant taken from 
its native habitat, and 
placed in entirely new soil 
and environments, may be 
expected to develop new features, 
so is it with human beings. The 
influence of the innate heredity, 
may lie dormant for a generation 
or two, overmastered and altered by 
the new surroundings and culture to 
which the young plant is subjected, 
by which a new type of character is 
developed ; and these influences make 
each generation different from the pre- 
vious; prevent the stereotyping of the 
race and lead us to have larger hopes for the 
future. But amongst the numerous influences 




powerfully effective in modifying and changing 
both the character and career of the race ; 
such as removal from the place of birth, 
change of circumstances in the family, the 
character of the mother, the all important 
influence of the nurse, the contagious contact 
of companions, and the training of teachers ; 
a very large place must certainly be given to 
the books read and assimilated in the plastic 
soil of the young soul. The fathers of 
Robert Burns and Thomas Carlyle are splen- 
did specimens of "impressions before the 
letters ; " while their sons are proof copies 
with the letters added. It is to men like 
them that Scotland owes its high position 
amongst the nations. Bred themselves 
from men who were persecuted for their 
opinions, which they believed were founded 
on the "impregnable Rock of Ages," and so 
ingrained in their consciences that they were 
prepared "to suffer the loss of all things for 
them," it is little wonder that although desti- 
tute of letters themselves, yet conscious of 
it — and this, indeed, is the main thing — the 
highest ambition of the humblest peasant 
in the land was to give at least one son a 
good education in the hope of seeing him 
" wag his head in a poupit " some day. 

A true old fashioned Scottish education 
began on the mother's knee, and was con- 
tinued, at least weekly, by questions in the 
Calvinistic manual — which is strong meat — 
and required learned and recondite explana- 
tions, dissertations, and illustrations by the 
father which generally, in former days at 
least, he was quite capable of giving. The 
atmosphere smelt of Calvinism, and when 



34 Brown's Book-Stall. 



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;®.ra3iers, ^Mcll ant) ^Srass Koun&ers, 

PLUMBERS, GKSPITTERS, COPPERSMITHS, &e.', 

Manufacturers of E^ervj Description of Brass and Gopper Work 
for Distillers, BreWers, Engineers, plumbers, &c., 

LITTLEJOHN STREET METAL WORKS, 

AND 

218 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 

Household Itinens* 



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also Rabies' anJ> (STbilfcren's Wn&erclotbing. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



35 



the young minds of the children tried their 
wings and essayed a flight by themselves into 
the world of liteiature, the books which they 
could lay hold upon all told much the same 
story. Happy they whose parents were so 
very liberal as to allow them to read a work 
of fiction ; who could indulge their fresh 
sentimentality in reading "The Persecuted 
Family," " Helen of the Glen," or Prof. 
Wilson's story of "The Elder's Deathbed." 
How powerfully affecting the stories were, 
and how stimulative the "letters." Far, far 
better than any " Reading made Easy," than 
any teacher, or even any University, are those 
books which, so kindly and gently, win their 
way into the young soul, leading by flowery 
paths into enchanting regions, and teaching 
"all that mankind has done, thought, gained, 
or been." They are the happy possessions 
of the humble, and the lasting wealth of the 
lofty and the wise, for does not Keats say : — 

" Bards of passion and of mirth, 
Ye have left your souls on earth ! 
Have ye souls in heaven too 
Double-lived in regions new ? . 
Thus ye live on high, and then 
On the earth ye live again ; 
And the souls ye left behind you 
Teach us, here, the way to find you, 
Where your other souls are joying, 
Never slumb'ring, never cloying. 

Here, your earth-born souls will speak 
To mortals, of their little week; 
Of their sorrows and delights ; 
Of their passions and their spites ; 
Of their glory and their shame ; 
What doth strengthen and what maim. 
Thus ye teach us, every clay, 
Wisdom, though fled far away." 

Have we not all read, with quickened 
pulse, with unwonted emotions of the heart, 
with choking sensations, somewhat relieved 
by water springing from the eyes, how two 
dear little bairnies, fresh from the perusal of 
the "Pilgrim's Progress," toddled hand-in- 
hand up the avenue to the mansion of the 
Laird, and ringing the bell enquired " if this 
was the house Beautiful, and if they could 
see Misses Prudence, Piety, or Charity?" 
with all of whom they seemed to be already 
well acquainted. Most fortunately they were 
not repulsed by a surly footman in plush ; 
but were met by one of the family, who, 



instantly divining the situation, showed them 
no small kindness and attention, took them 
into all the rooms, treated them to food which 
they thought divine, and answering all their 
eager enquiries, dismissed the little darlings 
with the sure certainty that, having seen 
Bunyan's veritable house and the young 
ladies, they were so far on the way to the 
Celestial City — which indeed they were, — "for 
of such is the kingdom of heaven." 

But the reading current amongst the lower 
and middle classes at the beginning of the 
present century, generally led in the very 
opposite direction, and their tendency was to 
breed immorality in servant girls, and juvenile 
burglary in boys, which is now attempted to 
be nipt in the bud by an enforced residence 
in the Reformatory. Marryat's novels were 
the means of sending to sea two Book-Stall 
apprentices, one of whom was effectually 
cured by his getting a touch of the rope's 
end. The other, a fine young fellow, finding 
his relatives hostile, made arrangements for a 
flight to London, believing that he had only 
to present himself to be at once admitted as 
a midshipman in the Navy. This intention 
of his being communicated to his parents 
was prevented by them from being carried 
out; but finding his mind bent on a seafaring 
life he was shipped as an apprentice on board 
a vessel trading between Swansea and South 
America, and on the third voyage the ship 
and all on board disappeared and was never 
more heard of. Even when books read did 
not determine the career in life, they, in many 
cases, most powerfully influenced the action. 
When Dicken's "Christmas Carol " appeared, 
several thousands of copies were sold in 
Liverpool, and never in the memory of the 
oldest inhabitant was there so much rejoicing 
in the homes of the poor there, by the un- 
precedented generous outflow of Christmas 
gifts which ensued. It was the common 
subject of remark in the place, that if it 
produced like results elsewhere, not any one 
sermon ever delivered, nor all the sermons 
ever published had produced such an out- 
burst of " Goodwill to men." So powerfully 
influential are some books ! 

It was the good fortune of all the Book- 
Stall assistants to have the freest access to 



3 6 Brown's Book-Stall. 




Ranks First 



in Every Way. 



BY SPECIAL WARRANT MAKERS TO H.M. THE QUEEN. 
CONTRACTORS TO H.M. GOVERNMENT 

The Type- PVriter Company, Ltd., 
22# Renfield Street, Glasgow. 

P. M. DURWARD, Manager. 
Aberdeen Agents— A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street, 

TRY. 



Littlejokrx & SorVs 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall, 



37 



the enormous accumulation of books in all 
branches of literature in the place. The 
very atmosphere breathed by them was literary. 
The motto of the firm might have been " In- 
dustry and Integrity." Yet each partner had 
a distinct speciality of his own ; that of the 
old Provost after fifty years' experience and 
having passed more books through his hands 
than all the then booksellers of Aberdeen 
put together, being very wide — especially in 
the value, both literary and commercial of 
books of all classes, — although, with his con- 
servative ideas, he was somewhat apt to forget 
the changed circumstances of half a century, 
and which changed still more during the 
next half. 

The speciality, or rather specialities of his 
son, William, were his knowledge of classical, 
musical, legal, continental, and controversial 
literature, and his culture was of a higher 
character than that of the other partners. 
Of Mr. William Brown, although regularly 
bred to the business, it might be said — and 
he admitted it — that he was not a bookseller, 
but a gentleman connected with the trade; 
and in his later years while he accepted the 
profits he was shy of acknowledging the 
connection, for reasons connected with his 
Government appointment as Distributor of 
Stamps and Collector of Taxes. Certainly 
he took no part in the management. 

Mr. Frost's mind was of a narrower and 
more restricted character. More emphatically 
than either of the other two partners, he 
was a business man, and methodically correct. 
A thorough specimen of the Bibliopole, his 
knowledge of books, acquired partly from 
the Provost, was more commercial than 
literary, his recreative reading being generally 
Catalogues, and his favourite book of books, 
"Boswell's Life of Dr, Johnson"; which he 
earnestly advised the writer to read once a 
year, with alternate doses of catalogues in 
place of fiction — good worthy man ! 

To him Dr. Johnson evidently was a model, 
and, if he read his life so frequently, it is 
little wonder that some traits of the Doctor's 
rough characteristic outspokenness should 
have been unconsciously copied by him. On 
one occasion a highland student called asking 
if we had "any second-handed Caesars?" 



Being told that we had not, but that the new 
ones were cheap, he asked a sight of them 
and got one. Turning up some particular 
passage he became utterly oblivious of his 
surroundings in the fixed and rapt attention 
he paid to the book, and to one particular 
passage in it, which he read and then turned 
the leaf. The assistant then asked him if it 
would suit, but the absorbed student made 
no reply. Asking him again, he said " Oh, 
maybe it will ! " and continued his perusal. 
Mr. Frost noticing his long continued pre- 
sence then came forward and said that he 
must not detain the assistant, but must make 
up his mind whether he would have it or not. 
Getting a little irritated at the student who 
continued to read, he asked him if the book 
would suit him. a O aye, the book'll do, 
Fat's the price o't ? " "Three shillings." 
The reading threatening to be again resumed, 
Mr. Frost said " Now, now this will never do, 
will you take it ? " After a pause the student 
said " I'll gie you eighteen pence for it ! " 
The book was instantly seized, and pitched 
to the farthest end of the counter, and the 
offerer pithily told in brief unpolite terms to 
go to the very warmest place conceivable. 
In Johnsonese fashion this relieved and 
soothed Mr. Frost's feelings, so injured and 
irritated at the cruel and wanton depreciation 
of any books of his, while the poor, innocent, 
guileless student who was only carrying out 
his hereditary habits, fled in dire dismay at 
his unexpected warm reception. 

But if the Book-Stall assistants were in- 
terested spectators of tragedies like these, 
affording them an insight into men and man- 
ners, sometimes they were diverted by inci- 
dents which roused their risibility. 

One Friday a big, burly looking farmer 
came marching into the Stall, but stopped 
about the centre of it and looked around him 
in evident wonder and amazement. It was 
quite apparent that he had several sheets in 
the wind, and the instant surmise of the writer 
was that in search of more liquor he had 
come to the wrong shop. As he stood in the 
centre of the shop, paying no attention to 
those at the counter, Mr. Frost stept up to 
him and asked if he could serve him, when 
the following colloquoy ensued : — 



38 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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39 



" Ha'e ye ony beuks ? " 

"O yes, plenty of them, as you can see." 

" Dyod aye, man ! ye seem to ha'e a gey 
cum o' them . . . eh — eh — lat me see — 
Ha'e ye Bingan's ' Pilgrim's Progress ? ' " 

" Yes, we have," and an assistant preparing 
to bring some copies the farmer said — 

" Ha'e ye the ' Confusion of Faith ? ' " 

Here a vague suspicion of the waggish 
character of his customer seemed to cross 
the mind of the proprietor of the Stall, and 
he said — "We have the 'Confession of Faith.' 
Do you want it ? " 

"Na, na, nae in the meantime! but nae 
doot ye'll ha'e lots o' Bibles ? " 

"Yes, we have, but do you want one?" 

" Weel — nae the day — but faun I dee want 
ane, I'll ken faur to come." And off he 
stalked ; the old Provost sitting in his chair 
in the corner, bursting out into an explosive 
laugh and saying "that's a character for you!" 

An eminent authority has said that "whisky 
and freedom gang thegither," and so far as 
individual freedom of speech is concerned, 
when the whisky is present and the wisdom 
is absent, the saying is quite true. But this 
story also illustrates the still older adage of 
" In vino Veritas " for whatever it may be in 
the present day, it is certain that owing to 
the early training in the olden times, not 
infrequently when a douce and generally 
sober citizen was beguiled into imbibing 
more spirits than was good for him, and when 
he was either slightly elevated or maudlin 
fou, then pious sentiments flowed from his 
lips, and his talk was redolent of spirituality. 
This farmer was an instance of this, and he 
talked as he was taught in the' impressive 
days of his verdant youth, before, by the evil 
examples around him, he had got corrupted. 

Besides the potent influence of books, and 
the study of the personal traits and characters 
of the three partners, the assistants had the 
peculiar advantage of coming into contact 
with several diverse elements in Society ; each 
class having a distinct atmosphere of its own, 
which revolved around — yet centred in the 
persons of the respective partners. And this . 
in itself is no small advantage to a young man 
entering into life, broadening his views, widen- 
ing his affections, obliterating his prejudices, 
and liberalising his opinions. 



By the year 1835, Mr. Brown, having been 
then fifty years in business, had gathered up 
all the accumulated wisdom derived from a 
wide and varied experience in private business 
and public work; and that in the most ex- 
citing period of our civic history, or even in 
our national annals. The son of one who 
was familiarly known as "the rinnin' minister," 
his activity in this respect had been cut short, 
by an unfortunate carriage accident, which 
compelled him to submit to the amputation 
of a leg ; but his mental activity was as brisk 
and nimble as ever, and he had quite a host 
of friends and admirers in the then influential 
classes of Aberdeen, many of whom made 
no pretensions to a love of literature; but 
gave the firm their solid and nourishing 
custom for their stationery and business books. 

A promoter and director of the Gas Com- 
pany, the Town and County Bank, the Lon- 
don, and the Leith Shipping Companies, the 
S. Provincial Assurance Company, and others, 
he gave to the public what was meant for the 
firm, yet getting his own special salary for his 
own special service. His office was the Book- 
Stall, and there congregated almost all the 
notables of the city. Old cronies of a 
bygone century, and ex-Provosts of a past 
regime came to bewail with him the extinguish- 
ment of the light of other days, and the 
degeneracy of the present times. City 
officials like Clerk Carnegie, James Hardie 
or James Fraser, his deputy, told him their 
griefs and bemoaned their lot to have to serve 
a lot of mean born Whigs, and his advice 
was sought by brother Directors and Burgesses 
on all conceivable subjects. In itself and 
apart from the ordinary business it was a 
lively scene. 

Like all old veterans off the stage his 
cronies were garrulous, and had many an old 
world story to tell of times when they had to 
stand in "the imminent deadly breach" before 
a meal mob, or a King's-birthday riotous 
assemblage — when they had to face death 
itself — at an execution ; or, when as officers in 
the Volunteers they had the possibility of 
actually crossing swords with their auld friends 
but now inveterate enemies on the other side 
of the water. Coupled with this and even 
more dreadful was the fearful fire of raillery 



4° 



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41 



which they had to encounter in the convivial 
parties of the period, when wags like Sandy 
Bannerman would sing songs like this : — 

" Noo if the French were landin' 

Atween the Don and Dee, 
I doot these gallant sodgers 

Wad be the first to flee ; 
For though their Captain bold micht frown, 

And their Chaplain micht declaim, 
There's little doot oor warriors 

Are valiantest at hame." 

Considering the well known, and widely 
celebrated, warlike, death-defying character of 
Aberdeen Officials and Baillies — some of 
whom can sleep tranquilly and undisturbed, 
although threatened to have their heads 
taken off by an unruly mob of Buchan Anti- 
trawlers — this raillery was simply libellous. 
For even before, but certainly ever since the 
battle of Harlaw, the courage of Aberdeen 
Provosts and Baillies was celebrated both far 
and near. So much so, that by a civic en- 
actment the Provost was prohibited from 
going beyond the city boundary, in order 
that he himself might be preserved, but also 
that by his death-dealing sword the country 
might not be depopulated. And from 
primeval times, Aberdeen Baillies were objects 
of majestic awe which continued down to the 
days of Lord Cockburn, who was nervously 
anxious not to offend them or to keep them 
waiting for the arrival of the judges when on 
circuit. 

On one occasion when he was in the West, 
the Lords on the North Circuit sent word 
to the City officials that they would arrive at 
the Bridge of Dee at four p.m. on a specified 
day to process into town. The day arrived, 
and the careful Clerk Carnegie had all things 
ready. The awe-inspiring cortege of carriages 
with the Town Serjeants in their brave and 
brilliant liveries, left the Town Hall in good 
time, and after safely depositing the Provost 
in Machray's hotel, wended their way to the 
Bridge, arriving there in ample time. 

It is a proof of the wisdom of our fore- 
fathers that they not only took good care of 
their Provost, but had a kindly regard for 
the material welfare, comfort, and consolation 
of all their magistrates, for in the Council 
Register, 1750, vol. 61, page 482, this entry 
is found: — "The gentlemen going out to 



meet the Judges on the Circuit j and stopping 
at any public-house, the Dean of Guild may 
give them a moderate glass only." So, satisfied 
that they had done their duty, and fatigued 
with their foreign travel beyond the precincts 
of the burgh, they gladly entered the Inn to 
refresh themselves, leaving the Serjeants and 
postillions to look out for the Judges coming 
over the hill to the south. 

Hour after hour passed away, moderate 
glass — which meant one glass at a time — ■ 
succeeded moderate glass, until the term 
became rather inappropriate, when about 
eight o'clock notice was given that the Judges 
were . approaching. The company immedi- 
ately turned out in great spirits, or vice versa, 
with great spirits in them ; but for the honour 
of the city, it is proper to mention that the 
Senior Baillie, never for one moment forgetting 
the dignity of his representative office, ap- 
proached the carriage of the Judge, and, 
taking a huge turnip-sized silver watch out of 
his pocket and pointing to it, said " Ca' ye this 
four o'clock, ma Lord ? " The Judge blushed 
as scarlet as his robes ; winced under the 
merited rebuke, and never forgot the lesson 
he had received. That Senior Baillie de- 
serves to have a granite statue erected to his 
memory at the Bridge of Dee, with his question 
engraved on the pedestal, for is not time 
money ? A wicked tradition — and that kind 
has as many lives as a cat — has it that early 
next morning, when the ostlers were pro- 
ceeding to clean out the carriages for the 
procession of the Lords to the Court, Clerk 
Carnegie was found in one of them fast 
asleep. Tradition may have wronged the 
worthy clerk, but it is also on dit that, on 
hearing this story, a local poet was inspired 
to write a song with the well known refrain 
" There's aye some water faur the stirkie 
droons!" adroitly hitting in it more cases 
than that of Clerk Carnegie. 



GET A RUBBER STAMP 
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42 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



JOHN MCLEOD, 

J^iairbrcBser unt ^P>crfumcr, 
40 BRIDGE STREET, ABERDEEN. 



Ladies and Gentlemen's Wigs, Scalps, Scalpetts, and 
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and proper attention. 



Alexander Laing, 

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Brown's Book-Stall. 



43 



Aberdeen Doctors 

At Home and Abroad 

The Narrative of a Medical School. 

BY 

Ella Hill Burton Rodger. 

Demy Svo, 10/6. 



" We have been strangely fascinated by this volume on the 
Aberdeen Doctors. We marvel at the minuteness of Mrs. 
Rodger's research, which is equalled, so far as we can judge, 
by its extreme accuracy." — Saturday Review. 

"A very interesting contribution to the biographical and 
and social history of the great medical school of the north, full 
of telling anecdote and genial personal detail." — Times. 

"A book that will delight every reader. It is throughout 
full of interest and information." — Aberdeen Journal. 

Very delightful are her pages of the primitive doctor and 
of Aberdeenshire a hundred years ago. . . . The writer's 
portraiture of the dead and gone giants in medical science are 
instinct with life ; and every page displays a thorough know- 
ledge and a just appreciation of the times of which she writes." 
— Dundee Advertiser. 



William Blackwood & Sons, 

EDINBURGH and LONDON. 

Think it over, 

If you read this advertise- 
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read yours, if it is in 
Browns Book-Stall. 

Therefore make it 

Your Business 

to have it in next month. 

See ? 



Boofes XRHortb Busing. 



Aberdeen Doctors at Home and Abroad. By Mrs. 
Ella Hill Burton Rodger. 



Long ere now every collector of local literature 
will have added to his bookshelf this interesting 
volume, but I trust it is not too late in the day 
to write a line in its praise. Not only to the 
Medical Faculty, but also to the general reader, will 
the book commend itself as a carefully compiled and 
most entertaining record of the careers of many well- 
known and justly respected Aberdeen Doctors of 
bye-gone days. Opening with a chapter devoted to 
Physicians in the past — both before and after our 
so-called Reformation— Mrs. Rodger proceeds to 
describe, in a highly-diverting way, the old-fashioned 
town and country practitioner, passing from this to 
the founding of the Medical Society in 1789. Of the 
many other interesting chapters dealing with the 
history and progress of medicine in the North of 
Scotland, space will not allow me to do more than 
make mention, while to all of us we have still a soft 
spot in our heart for our Northern University, and 
love to recall the happy days spent at Marischal, the 
chapters on School and College Life in bye-gone 
times will be specially attractive. Nor are the gay 
"resurrectionist" days forgotton, for the authoress 
has devoted a chapter to this exciting topic, while an 
account is also given of the burning of the " burking- 
house." Worthily and well has Mrs. Rodger 
performed her labour of love in chronicling the 
progress of the Medical School in our Northern 
University Town. 



The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. A. Con an Doyle 



Of the ordinary run of detective stories we have 
had plenty, and this class of fiction was beginning to 
fall into disrepute when Mr. Conan Doyle produced 
the first of the famous "Sherlock Holmes" series — 
"The Adventure of a Scandal in Bohemia." Those 
who pride themselves on their memory may remember 
that the tale appeared in the first number of the 
Strand Magazine, and from that moment the success 
of the new monthly was assured. Next month came 
"The Adventure of the Red Haired League," and as 
tale succeeded tale, each more thrilling than its 
predecessor, people began to discuss Sherlock Holmes 
and his wonderful system of reasoning, along with the 



44 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Materials of the Latest Designs, including 
French Merinos and Cashmeres. 



Dresses made of the follow big .Materials , 
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Brown's Book-Stall. 



45 



Bailies and the Railway Rates, over the walnuts and 
the wine. When an ordinary healthy Aberdonian, 
with no signs of hereditary lunacy about him, descends 
to such themes of conversation, you feel assured that 
there is something unusual in the wind, and you aren't 
far wrong. The interest aroused by the stories was 
something phenomenal, and the publishers have done 
a wise thing in lately issuing them in compact form. 
A handsome volume now lies before me containing the 
first dozen "Adventures" fully illustrated with the 
original sketches. The price is only 6/6, and from 
this has to be deducted the liberal discount you will 
receive for cash at Brown & Co.'s. 



Souvenir of King Lear. (As produced at the 
Lyceum Theatre, ioth November, 1892). 



Lovers of the Drama (and their number is legion in 
Bon-Accord) who cannot spare the time or possibly 
the money to visit the " big toon " and see Mr. Irving 
for themselves, should all be the possessors of one of 
these dainty souvenirs. The next best thing to seeing 
Mr. Irving in any of his many parts is to get a copy 
of the Lyceum souvenir of that particular play, while 
to those who have already seen the great tragedian, 
the booklet will afford a good idea of the dresses and 
scenery of one of his latest triumphs. The souvenir 
consists of some nine illustrations of the principal 
scenes in King Lear, contributed by Mr. Hawes 
Craven, who was the painter of the originals for the 
Lyceum stage. In addition, there are a couple of 
capital sketches of each of Mr. Irving as the King, 
and Miss Ellen Terry as the "fair Cordelia," drawn 
with that beauty of line and excellence of portraiture 
for which Mr. Bernard Partridge is so justly famous. 
The " Black and White " Publishing Company are 
responsible for the get up of the souvenir and the 
reproduction of the illustrations, which is the best 
guarantee I can give for the excellence. As the price 
is only 1/-, Messrs. Brown & Co. anticipate a big 
demand for this artistic and elegant volume. 

ST. JACK. 



Note : — The Editor requests that copies of books for review 
in this column, as well as periodicals to be noticed in our 
"Month's Magazine" page, be sent to J. G. R., Windermere 
House, 201 Albion Road, Stoke Newington, London, N. 



Ebis /Ifoontb's Machines, 



March, 1893. 



The Idler. I had intended to immortalise Jerome's 
"bookie" in these pages last month, but however 
much a humble scribe may propose, there is such an 
august being as the Editor who has a monopoly of the 
disposing business, and the weighty words I had 
written for the benefit of the genial reader are probably 
ere now undergoing a process of remanufacture at 
Piries' paper mills. Be that as it may, the Idler is 
always so good that it matters little whether one 
discusses the February or the March number. In the 
latter there is a most interesting discussion in the now 
famous Idler s Club on whether childhood's days are 
our happiest or not. On this point (having recollections 
of a certain Dominie whose chief end in life w T as the 
issuing of orders in a voice of awful import to "sit 
awa', Andra' Simpson, sit awa'," and whose only 
happiness was in the subsequent proceedings should 
Andra' Simpson not " sit awa' ") I think I am at one 
with Mr. Barry Pain who considers that the happiness 
of childhood is a delusion and the peace of the 
perambulator a myth ! 



The Magazine of Art. This monthly needs no 
praise from my pen to make you buy it. To lovers of 
Art, modern, mediaeval, and ancient — the Art, I mean 
of course, not the "lovers" — it comes almost natural 
to exchange a bob at Brown & Co.'s for the monthly 
copy, knowing as they do, that they have quite as good 
value for their money as in the higher priced Art 
periodicals, and a good deal less incomprehensibility 
(fine word that !), which, after all isn't a disadvantage. 
I might add that I believe the price is only tenpence 
to ordinary persons, did I not know that this is but a 
very minor consideration to an Aberdonian when Art 
with a capital A is concerned. 



Atalanta, is, as usual, up to the mark, and the dear 
creatures for whose especial benefit its bright and 
instructive pages are penned will find the March 
number particularly attractive. Mr. R. L. Stevenson's 
story makes good headway, while every girl in Aberdeen 
who writes "such charming verses, you know," should 
read Mrs. Fyvie Mayo's instructive Article on "The 
Brownings," in which she gives an interesting glimpse 
of the early lives of the deceased poet and his wife. 



46 



Browns' Book-Stall. 



The New Review is rather a mixed number — not 
that I mean for one moment that any of the writers 
have been dining with the Temperance Magistrates, 
but only that the quality of the contents is very varied. 
Foremost place is given to a couple of capital articles 
on the Labour Problem, the first by Sir Charles Dilke, 
and the other by genial Tom Mann, who, by the way, 
is now established in the old offices of the Home Rule 
Union in Palace Chambers, as Secretary to the recently 
re- organised London Reform Union. To Aberdonians, 
however, Dr. Hunter's Article on Railway Rates will 
be particularly interesting, coming from a townsman 
we all know so well. Other contributors include 
Bjornstjerne Bjornson, Dr. Ernest Hart, and Lewis 
Andrieux. 



The Picture Magazine still goes on its way rejoicing, 
with the "independent air" of a paper which knows 
that Mr. Newnes is looking after its interests, and that 
however black things may appear at first, its Editor 
will certainly pull it through. The introduction of the 
monthly series of portraits of the more celebrated 
representatives of Art, the Bench, Literature, and the 
Drama, is a good one, and ought, if kept up, to be 
successful. Ere long the new magazine will get 
knocked into shape and find its way into every house- 
hold where really good pictures are appreciated. 



The Theatre. Of the many magazines and period- 
icals which are devoted in whole or in part to the 
interests of the Drama, none has yet appeared which 
has so strong a claim both on the ground of age and of 



excellence for foremost place as The Theatre. In the 
days when the Seventies were but young, it was a 
power in the dramatic world, and its successful career 
has gone on uninterruptedly since then to the present 
day. As a record of theatrical events, to the playgoer 
it is invaluable, for, not only are all the principal 
productions of the preceding month reviewed at con- 
siderable length, but copies of the playbill are also 
given, while the photos and other illustrations accom- 
panying each part certainly could not be purchased 
singly for the price of the entire magazine. The 
present month's number contains a reproduction from 
a scene from the latest Haymarket success, Hypatia, 
with portraits of Mr. Beerbohm Tree and Miss Neilson, 
and a fine cabinet photo of Mr. Holloway, of the 
Lyceum Company, who took Mr. Irving's part in King 
Lear during the latter's indisposition. We feel certain 
that this periodical has only to be more extensively 
known in Aberdeen to be better appreciated. 



Longman's Magazine. I have often wondered 
wherein lay the special charm of Longman's that 
drew you to its pages after every other magazine had 
failed to interest, but I am as far from a solution to 
the mystery as ever. Certain it is that though almost 
monotonous in the nature of its contends, there is a 
mysterious something about it that I find lacking in 
every one of its contemporaries. In the present 
number there are neither names to conjure with nor 
even an article on the never-failing Labour Question, 
yet it is an exceedingly interesting part. I would 
specially commend to the kind consideration of all the 



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PURE GOLDEN TIPS, YOUNG TEA BUDS, 3/ per lb. 

Contains the Cream and Essence of Tea, and is classed as the Finest the World 

produces. Free tasting Samples on application, or Six lb. Carriage 

Paid to any address. Terms Cash. 




JOHN ADAMS 

^ Sign of the Golden Tea Pot. 



64 GREEN. ABERDEEN. 



Established 1858. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



47 



ladies in Bon-Accord who have trouble with their 
servants, the delightful article on "Mistresses and 
Maids. " From it they will learn all about the treatment 
and dietary necessary for the proper cultivation of this 
Household Exotic, and, from a comprehensive table 
of the duties which the various classes of Domestics 
will condescend to perform, they will be guided in the 
etiquette to be observed in assigning the particular 
rooms to be looked after by the Upper, Second, and 
Third Housemaids. I can guarantee that if all the 
troubled mistresses (about three-fourths of the female 
population) in town would read this article, Messrs. 
Longmans would know a difference in their sales, and 
the occupation of Registry Offices, like Othello's, would 
be gone ! 

ST. JACK. 



Other magazines received- 
Magazine, Chums, etc. 



The Strand. Winter '.r 



Treasonable Prices and Good Work 

W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers. 

23 Bridge Street, 

Bberfceen. 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries." 



Art in Aberdeen. 



The Aberdeen Artists' Society is holding its Sixth 
Annual Exhibition, and those who fail to see it and 
study the pictures carefully, will miss not only a great 
treat but a great educational power. The First Exhibi- 
tion of the kind in Aberdeen was held in 1821, with 
the Earl of Fife as patron, and of the 264 works 
shown, out of 37 exhibitors, 22 were all the way from 
London. 

The Second Exhibition was held in 1829, when the 
local artists were represented thus : Mr. Giles 30 
pictures, Fraser 7, Troup 16, Brebner 14, Roger 14, 
Mercer 10, Clark 7, with a large number by amateurs, 
and 2 pieces of sculpture by Mr. Hay. 

The present catalogue shows nearly 900 exhibits, 
while its cost is the same as it was then with one-third 
the number of objects shown, and money now at half 
the value of that time. 

Justice has never yet been done to the Art pro- 
ductiveness of Aberdonians ; and the theme affords 
a rich and fertile field for the pens of some of the 
present exhibitors. Artists should remember that by 
the pen and the printing press they may extend their 
influence far wider than by their pictures. Perhaps 
some of them do not know that the trumpet of Fame 
is now blown by a Printer's Devil, and not by old- 
fashioned cherubs. 



Z\-l 



NOVELS fo: 



Brown & Co., 
77 Union Street 



1/6 



JEAJ flflDMTEH'S ItOOfll : 



IS NOW APPEARING IN 



A True Story of Aberdeen Fifty Years Ago ; 
introducing many well-known Local Characters 
and Incidents of By-gone Days, 

the WEEKLY NEWS. 



HEKHY 



For INTERESTING REMINISCENCES of 

TKIfrftOT ^he Eminent Aberdeen Tragedian, 

imipui, see the WEEKLY W EWS 



EVERY 

FRIDAY. 



THE WEEKLY NEWS has the largest circulation of any paper out of 
London, over 250,000 copies being sold every week. 

W. & D. C. THOMSON, Proprietors and Publishers, 
eX^X 18 ADELPHI, ABERDEEN. K^ 



4 8 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



ey6Xf§)©0 




SCURGLKeX* 



William Jackson, Bookbinder, 

18 Back Wynd, Aberdeen. 



All the Styles of BOOKBINDING carefully and well done. 

She Binding otf (Dusic Boohs a Speciality. 
CHEAP AND NEAT BINDINGS FOR PERIODICALS. 



Please send for a copy of Price List with 
" Notes on Bookbinding." 



Buy your SKKDS and other Requisites 
for the Garden at the 





EED-STAIili, 



11 Bridge jStefe, Aberdeen. 



(Eardno & Darling. 



The day has come 

When competition compels us to make a 
Special Revised List of Prices in this 
branch of our Business. 



FUNERAL UNDERTAKING. 

£6 10/ - Polished Pine Coffins now for £4 4/- 
.£10 10/- Polished Oak Coffins now for £6 6/- 

All with Brass Mountings. 
Cloth Covered Coffins from 19/6 (Nicely Mounted) 

Complete Arrangements for conducting 
Funerals in Town and Country. 

Every Requisite supplied at Lowest 
Wholesale Prices. 

Telegrams instantly attended to. 
Telephone 90. 



T. R. WATSON & CO., 

The Town and County Funeral Undertaking 
Establishment, 

14 St. Paul Street, Aberdeen 

(Open Night and Day). 

— ■— MfMg M I ■I WIW M — III I I WWI1 MIII— ■— m 




With this number we send a Specimen Sheet of 



HIERATICA 

(a vegetable parchment), 
The Ancient Writing Paper of the Priests. 



5 Quire Packet with your Address printed, 
and 100 Envelopes to match, for 



2/6 



A. BROWN & CO., 

77 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 



GOLD MEDAL Awarded for Special Excellence. 



BY HER MAJESTY'S 




ROYAL LETTERS PATENT. 



" The Queen of all Table Drinks" 



FORBES, MAXWELL, & CO.'S 

GHAJVLPAGNE GINGER BEER 



AS been pronounced by 1,000 of Scotland's 
most eminent Medical Men to be the only 
perfect Health-Preserving Table Drink — a thousand 
times superior to Aerated Waters and Fermented 
Beverages. The patented process of manufacture 
protects the consumer from the dangerous effects of 
lead and other metallic poisons. 

Most suitable for mixing with Wines and Spirits. 
The most welcome friend in every sick room, and 
indispensable on every table. Try it once and you 
will never be without it. 




TO BE HAD FROM ALL GROCERS AND CHEMISTS. 




«AN ENTIRELY HEW pW$ 

SOLE MAKERS' ...j, 
i, MAXWELL X<m 

msfflfl 



Caution. — Do not be imposed upon. Beware of 
spurious imitations and the fraudulent use of 
this title. The Patentees and Sole Makers ar 



Forbes, Maxwell, i 0. L TD - A™ EEN - 




Published at 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. 



APRIL. 



1893. 



THE 



COLONIAL MUTUAL 

Life Assurance Society Limited. 



OFFICES: 33 POULTRY, LONDON, E.C. 

Manager: EDWARD W. BROWNE, F.S.S. 



Funds Exceed . . . £l, 450,000. 
Annual Income Exceeds ,£400,000. 



POLICIES UNCONDITIONAL, UNCHALLENGEABLE, INDEFEASIBLE. 

RESIDENCE AND TRAVEL IN ANY PART OF THE WORLD. 

TONTINE POLICIES ISSUED COMBINING INSURANCE WITH INVESTMENT 
AT WHOLE LIFE AND ENDOWMENT RATES. 



ORDINARY ENDOWMENT POLICIES at Moderate Premiums, payable in 15, 
20, 25, 30, or 35 years, or in event of previous death. 

EXAMPLE— 

At age 25, a Policy for ^500 with profits, payable at 55 or previous death, can 
be secured by an annual payment of ^15 1 8. 

CHILDREN'S ENDOWMENT— NEW PLAN. 

Endowment Policies, payable at age 14 or 21 — Premiums ceasing on the death of Parent 
or Guardian. These Policies form a convenient means of providing funds for a Marriage 
Portion for a Daughter, or for a University Education or Indenture Fee for a Son. 



Apply for Prospectus and Table of Rates to 

34 Bridge Street, "Aberdeen. 

CHARLES A. BODIE, District Inspector. 



ELE CTRO-PLAT I NG. 

W ILLIAM BAI N, 

The Northern Machine Warehouse, 
Principal Office— 9 BRIDGE STREET, Aberdeen. 

BRANCH-12 GREAT WESTERN ROAD. 

Gitv) Gycle and Plating Works— 98 GOLLEQE STREET, ar\d at NEWCASTLE. 



EliECTRO-PllflTlHG ^ SILVER and NICKEL > by fully experienced Platers, carefully 

— and promptly executed in Household Plate, Cycles, &c. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. BRING A TRIAL ORDER. 



(CYCLES — The only Warehouse for a Large Selection. 

SEWING MACHINES.— Finest hand machines. 

KNITTING MACHINES. PERAMBULATORS. MAIL CARTS. MANGLES. WRINGERS. 

parts for all cycles and sewing machines. 

Repairs. Enamelling, and Electro-Plating 




Waterproof 

^4 Bfraeed Coats, Capes, and Mantles. 



DANISH KID JACKETS. 

SURGICAL AND LAWN TENNIS GOODS. 

©lactone anb otbcr travelling Bags- 

HORSE LOIN, LORRY, AND STACK COVERS. 

RUBBER ^OSE. MATS AND SHEETINQ, BELTINQ, &c. 



FINDLAY & CO 



96 i&nion Street, Aberdeen. 




No. 1 6. 



APRIL. 



1893. 



Brown's Bberfceen Boofe*5talL 

No. XVI. 



Jn jflbemorfam. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON WILSON. 
1822-1893. 



"The fixed and unchanging features of the country 
also perpetuate the memory of the friend with whom 
we once enjoyed them ; who was the companion of our 
most retired walks, and gave animation to every lonely 
scene. His idea is associated with every charm of 
nature ; we hear his voice in the echo which he once 
delighted to awaken ; his spirit haunts the grove which 
he once frequented ; we think of him in the wild 
upland solitude, or amidst the pensive beauty of the 
valley. In the freshness of joyous morning we re- 
member his beaming smiles and boundless gaiety ; 
and when sober evening returns with its gathering 
shadows and subduing quiet, we call to mind many a 
twilight hour of gentle talk, and sweet-souled mel- 
ancholy : — 

Each lonely place shall him restore, 
For him the tear be duly shed : 

Beloved, till eye can charm no more, 
And mourn'd, till pity's self be dead." 

W. Irving, 1783- 1859. 

LOVE and Friendship being the two 
satellites of the human soul, without 
them life would indeed be a dreary 
desert. But as life is lengthened to us, those 
we love drop away and our circle of friends 
grows every year less and less. Let us be 
thankful when the circle is narrowed by death, 



and not by alienation, for dead friends are 
friends for eternity, without any necessity for 
those revelations which the spirit world will 
make clear, and which will unite those who 
were alienated on earth. 

And yet it is with sad and melancholy 
feelings, full of mournful regret for his loss, 
full of subdued, tender recollections; yet 
full also of happy memories, brightly illumin- 
ating a long, confidential, and unbroken 
intimacy of nearly half a century with 
George Washington Wilson, that we 
comply with the earnest requests of several 
mutual friends, that before death seals for 
ever human eyes, silences human tongues, 
and strikes human hands with palsy, some 
of these recollections should be given to his 
very numerous friends and associates in the 
Book-Stall. 

For in his young days it was one of his 
early "houffs," where he was well known 
both to the employees and the customers, 
and where, when continued intercourse had 
soldered his soul to that of the then pro- 
prietor, he spoke out his inmost sentiments 
more frankly and freely than he did anywhere 
else. 

Trained in methodical habits, the then 
proprietor of the Book-Stall had been long 
accustomed to note down any occurrences 
thought important at the time. And these, 
"stewed in their own juice" for a sufficient 
time, and afterwards distilled, formed the 
groundwork of a Journal, the perusal of 
which in his old age, enables him to live, not 
only verily, but vividly in those far back 
times and scenes ; which times and scenes, 



5o 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



THIN 

CO 



u 

O 



W 



CD 



o 

2 



-4— I 



p en 

J O 

> 



z 
PQ w 
P 8 

U 



s 













50 Visiting Cards 

Printed for 1/6. 



Addresses 6d. extra. 



A. Brown & Co., Stationers, 
JJ Union Street, Aberdeen. 




LOOK UP HflD DOWfl. 




ueapjeqv '^99^S UOIUfl n 

■d-BaqQ puB pOOQ 
39§ oi 90T3[d sqj SI 

SUAVOjg 



o 






Co 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



51 



to those who have not adopted this plan, 
must be mere dim and misty cloudlands; 
peopled by shadowy forms, faces, and objects 
— projecting through the gloom like spectral 
ghosts and phantoms — while the writer has 
a red thread guiding him through these 
catacombs of the past. 



When photography began to make itself 
heard of, Mr. Wilson had adopted miniature 
painting as his role and profession, and had 
been hitherto successful in it. But he had 
the idea that this art of his was doomed to 
extinction by the new process, and so, more 
awake than others to the progress of science, 
he occupied his spare hours in continual ex- 
periments on lenses and cameras — in which 
his first handicraft as a joiner was then, and 
on many after occasions, invaluable to him, 
for in many wanderings in wild out-of-the- 
way excursions, accidents to the Camera 
would sometimes occur, and then he had 
"to shoe his own horse," and he did it quite 
effectually and efficiently, when many others 
would have broken down in sheer despair. 

The Daguerreotype process of sun pictures 
on silverized copper plates was first exhibited 
in the Mechanic's Institution to Aberdonians 
in the forties of this century ; but beyond 
Mr. Wilson and Mr. Ernst Donald, (a pro- 
vision curer, then in the employment of C. 
Gordon & Sons), it seemed to have failed 
in attracting anything like general attention. 
Specimens are still in existence, and yet 
retaining their excellence. 

The Collodion process (1852), was an 
immense stride in advance, and when in 1854, 
the fashionable carte de visite was introduced, 
it seemed to photographers something equal 
to the discovery of a new continent. Several 
citizens, — Francis Craigmile, teacher; William 
Shepherd, confectioner; Thomas Riddell, 
and others, gave time and attention to it, but 
in a fitful sort of way, and as mere amateurs. 

Far and beyond all these however, Mr. 
Wilson's experience, both as an artist, and an 
optician, carried him ahead of all competitors. 
So much so, that the late Mr. John Hay, the 
carver and gilder, one of the shrewdest of 
x\berdonians, recognising his artistic abilities 



and possibilities, induced him to join in a 
partnership with his son ; and an operating 
room being erected off the Guestrow, adjoin- 
ing Mr. Hay's workshop, a flourishing business 
was conducted there for some years ; during 
which Mr. Wilson's talents and time in man- 
ipulating the camera, the chemicals, and the 
colouring of the pictures were severely taxed, 
while Mr. Hay had the satisfaction of framing 
the pictures. 

The new " black art," being evidently 
fitted to deal with more subjects than human 
ones, and the whole tendency of the times 
being a demand for accuracy and truthfulness 
in the delineation of anything attempted to 
be depicted, at the writer's request Mr. Wilson 
turned his attention to landscape photography, 
and to please him, he experimented and took 
various views in and around the city, some of 
which are now valuable. 

In ancient times the old Greeks in their 
mythological manner harnessed the sun, and 
compelled him to draw — the chariot of Apollo 
— but in 1839, tne practical moderns in the 
shape of Daguerre, harnessed him once more, 
and compelled him to draw — sun pictures for 
photographers — free from the aberrations and 
the phantasies of the human intellect. For 
from the time of the Egyptian hieroglyphics, 
and all through the ages, the pictures drawn 
by human beings were tinctured and modified, 
not only by the personality of the artist, as a 
materialist or a spiritualist, as a poet or an 
artist, but by the tyrannical fashion of the' con- 
tinually changing times. If we want literal 
truth, then Canaletti the Venetian painter 
( 1 697-1 768) furnishes the nearest approach to 
it; if we want fancy and imagination, then 
our own English Turner (17 75-1851) supplied 
it to satiety. 

This was art for the cultured and refined ; 
for the common people, the condition and the 
presentment was of the crudest kind. The 
popular literature, even well into this century, 
consisted mainly of Chap books, comprising 
"all kinds of histories, godly and other 
patters, valentine writers, dream books, 
fortune tellers, old ballads, broadsheets, slip 
songs, etc.," on all of which there had been 
little change for some generations, and on 
which the rude figure of a man did duty as a 



52 Brown's Book-Stall. 



G. Mitchell Moir, 

Music Seller, 

O, Has a most Choice Selection of. 



ife^^afy American Organs 
^f mm *Wl and rianos. 



AiffT 



82 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



Household Jkinens* 



P. BEVERIDGE 

Invites inspection of his Stock of 

able Linen, Cotton and Iiinen Sheetings, Tomels and Towellings, 

Blankets, flannels, Eider-Domn Quilts, 

also Rabies' ant> (UMbren's Tltn&erclotbfng. 

'ZflZauxaqe and Sfozeian SflLovpeiu and Ontjittiny Ozdeio mazked 
and delivered leadu foi use. 






39 & 41 ST. |iIGfl(MS STREET, ABERDEEN 



ESTABLISHED 1841. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



53 



true portrait of Judas Iscariot, Robinson 
Crusoe, Frederick the Great, or Oliver Crom- 
well ! 

J. Newberry, the bookseller at the "Bible 
and Sun in St. Paul's Churchyard, 1766," 
that good old friend of "all young gentlemen 
and ladies, who are good, or intend to be 
good," was not only the first to issue a series 
of delightful children's books, full of common 
sense and good advice, but the first to 
illustrate them with cuts made specially for 
them, and in which, with sly humour — worthy 
of Oliver Goldsmith, the reputed author of 
" Goody Two Shoes," — the cuts are said to 
be by Michael Angelo ! 

But the upheaval of the human mind, to 
which the French Revolution gave birth, 
operated in every department of human 
enterprise. The search for knowledge and 
truth received an impetus it has never lost 
since, and by means of cheap publications like 
the Penny and Saturday Magazines, Cham- 
bers's Edinburgh Journal, etc., literature began 
to penetrate into the highways and byeways 
of the land. Then illustrated newspapers 
sprang into existence, and photography came 
as the realisation of Burn's earnest desire — 

" O wad some power the giftie gie us, 
To see oursels as ithers see us." 

In 1853, Mr. Wilson commenced business 
by himself in Crown Street, and acquired 
celebrity by his portraits, in which his only 
rival at the time was Mr. Roger of St. 
Andrews. When he had collected some 
hundreds of these, at the suggestion of the 
writer, and with his assistance in the arrange- 
ment, two groups of "Aberdeen Portraits" 
were issued, which, on their publication, gave 
rise to not a little wonderment amongst the 
citizens as to when and where so many of 
their number could have been assembled and 
taken — as many believed — at one and the 
same time ; and only when it was discovered 
that some of the number had been dead for 
many months, was it found out that the 
portraits had been grouped, and not the 
citizens. The then novel idea was a great 
success, and sold by thousands; was de- 
manded by the public far faster than with 
Mr. Wilson's conscientious carefulness in the 



washing of the prints — in order to secure 
their permanency as far as possible — they 
could be supplied. A photographer merely 
anxious to make money, and careless of his 
artistic fame in the future, could and would 
have supplied them as fast as wanted, but 
Mr. Wilson was so careful, that after forty 
years copies of them still exist as brilliant as 
the day they were issued. And now that the 
artist himself has crossed the silent river, an 
old Aberdonian having these two groups, is in 
possession of a veritable Pantheon, having in 
it the small divinities of the stage they trod, 
and by means of it, he can recall the days of 
old, and live once more for a short space of 
time amongst his respected, admired, or 
beloved companions. It is far better than a 
walk in the churchyard, more expressive than 
a funeral sermon, and comes home much 
more feelingly to the heart, and specially to 
the affections, than even an eloquent discourse 
on death, for as drops of water wear the very 
stone, so the continuity of the Reaper's work 
is forcibly impressed on us, and sighing, 
we say : — 

"Like clouds that sweep the mountain summit, 
And waves that own no curbing hand, — 
How fast has comrade followed comrade 
From sunlight to the sunless land." 

When in 1838, Wheatstone discovered the 
principle of the Stereoscope, by which a 
drawing of an object was invested with reality, 
and an actual body with a visible projection 
and rotundity; but still more when in 1849, 
Sir David Brewster brought this discovery 
within the comrJass of optical lenses, an 
entirely new world was opened up to the 
photographer. Mr. Wilson's new found 
friend — who luckily had a good deal of the 
optimist in him, and who was thus fitted to 
be the complement of one who was inclined 
to take pessimistic views — was keenly alive to 
the new possibilities opened up to the world 
of art, and strongly urged him to experiment 
with these new lenses and produce some 
specimens ; for already stereoscopic views by 
Frith had attracted attention, and were in 
demand. We two then took a holiday at 
Cults — if hard work could be called so — and 
came home with about a dozen specimen 
views, which were entirely experimental on 



54 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



harper 



CO, 



44 



Wive tOophera and tOi^e (Devchanis. 



LAWN 
MOWERS. 



A LARGE SELECTION 

BY 

BEST MAKERS. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR CASH 




A Speciality. 



Laivn Moiver 



Sharpening 

and 
Repairing. 



GARDEN SEATS AND CHAIRS. 
GARDEN ROLLERS AND HOSE REELS. 



WIRE 

ARCHWAYS. 

WIRE 

FLOWER STANDS. 

WIRE 

BORDERING. 

WIRE 

PEA GUARDS. 

WIRE 

PEA TRAINERS. 

WIRE 

TRELLIS WORK 

W RE 

NETTING. 




WIRE 

MEAT-SAFES. 

WIRE 

DISH COVERS. 

WIRE 

WINDOW BLINDS. 

WIRE 

DOOR MATS. 

WIRE 

FOR GARDEN WALLS. 

WIRE 

CAGES. 

WIRE 

ANYTHING. 



HM^EH STREET, JVBWDEEtt. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



55 



his part, with little or no outside guidance. 
Among these was a view of the "Old Mill," 
which, when developed and mounted, was so 
satisfactory, that although stereoscopic pictures 
were then two shillings each, the writer at 
once gave him an order for two dozen copies. 
Looking up in greatly visible astonishment, 
he said — " Are you serious ? " " Quite serious ! 
and it is only the first order." " Then " said 
he " this is something worth cultivating." 

And so it proved to be ; it sold well, and 
many dozens of it were needed, and were 
highly appreciated by the public. It was even 
more highly appreciated by the " Stall " pro- 
prietor, who felt a sort of parental affection 
in the bantling, and especially as he was then 
spontaneously placed by the photographer on 
quite exceptional terms — even more favoured 
than by "the most favoured nation clause." 
A partnership was pressed upon him again 
and again, but literature was his first love, 
with a sneaking fondness for art, and although 
the pursuit of the new art would certainly 
have been more profitable, yet if he had 
accepted this partnership, he would have 
consciously felt himself to be guilty of bigamy, 
and that he could not think of. The un- 
written, even unexpressed relationship — a 
sort of quasi-partnership then formed — con- 
tinued as long as Mr. Wilson lived, with 
mutual pleasure and delight to both. 

Next year, in August, 1859, the writer 
accompanied him on a photographic excursion 
to Braemar, which proved so delightful and 
inspiring, that he could not refrain from 
giving an account of it in the Aberdeen Herald, 
and as showing the entirely different character 
of the photographic process then and now, 
the following extract may be permitted : — 

" Shifting our camera to the rocks overhead (above 
the Colonel's bed in Glen Eye), for a view of the glen, 
the exciting character of taking photographic pictures 
was brought strongly into notice. Talk of deer- 
stalking ; and the excitement of watching the antlers 
as one crawls snake-fashion through the mud and moss 
to get within reach — or of salmon fishing, and the 
delight experienced when after an hour s hard contest, 
the strain begins to relax, and the fear commences, 
least having got him within reach of the gaff, an un- 
skillful hand may, in the attempt, rouse all his dormant 
energies, and he may yet carry off your tackle as a 
trophy instead of being carried off himself. Some- 
what akin to the photographer is the moment, when 



with plate in the camera, and hand on the slide, he 
casts a hasty glance at the sky, and then on the scene, 
removes the slide, and then, with nervous anxiety, 
fearing to breath, lest the leaves rustle, counts the 
seconds ; watching if the trees are steady, and the 
light is constant ; eagerly desiring that the little cloud 
may pass and allow the sun to stream out for a few 
seconds, to gild the tips of the rocks, to burnish the 
rugged bark of the trees, to lighten the foreground 
with a living glory, and to stamp the picture as ' a 
joy forever.'" 

Since this was written a whole generation 
has passed away, and to the photographer of 
the present day all things have become new. 
The art has become easy to the very meanest 
capacity. But surely all the more honour to 
him, who, like Livingstone, found his own 
pathway in the then unknown country, who 
made numerous discoveries in it, and yet who 
was so entirely unselfish as to publish through 
the "Book-Stall" all his discoveries, laying 
bare his most recent discoveries without any 
reserve. For if any man ever did so, he 
worked, not so much for his own special 
advantage, as for the love of, and the advance- 
ment of art, and like all men who do so, he 
at last received his reward. 

Encouraged by the success of the Braemar 
stereoscopic views which from that year be- 
came one of his specialities, the writer induced 
him to accompany him to the Trosachs, lived 
ten days there, and explored every nook and 
cranny, and came home laden with valuable 
negatives. 

After that, year by year, we were constant 
companions, and explored together many of 
the wildest districts of Scotland with the aid (?) 
of maps, which were so very imperfect, that 
we sent corrections of them to the publishers, 
and before the Ordnance surveyors had pen- 
etrated into these districts, the then best maps 
of Scotland received valuable corrections 
from us, which were thankfully acknowledged 
and adopted, to the great benefit of future 
explorers. 

In 1859 we worked the west coast, 

"Where Grampians over Grampians soar, 
Where dowie dens, deep bosomed lie, 
Where ends the long Atlantic roar 
Beneath the savage hills of Skye," 

visited Oban, Tobermory — with the remark- 
ably fine waterfall of Aros — then Skye, Iona, 
and Staffa. 



56 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



PRATT & KEITH, 

__ ABERDEEN, 



Have the most extensive Stock of IblQfXTlaeS 2Draper$, Carpet0, 
and jf imtitUre in the North of Scotland, at Moderate Prices. 



INSPECTION RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED. 



PRATT & KEITH, 

Ladies Tailors, Drapers, and House Furnishers, 
Palace Buildings, Aberdeen. 

Telegrams-" Palace," Aberdeen. 



Established 1830. 



W.&d. Walker, 

Umbrella 

Man ufacturers, 

98 Union Street, 

Aberdeen, . 



The Cheapest Shop in Toain 

FOR 

Groceries, Teas, Provisions 
and Confections, 



IS 



^Dutch's provision Stores, 

93 GEORGE STREET, 



Sole Agent in Aberdeen for the 

FAMOUS AIMERIA WINE. 



Dealer in Tobacco and Cigars. 



Browns' Book-Stall. 



57 



This adventure proved so remarkably suc- 
cessful, both pleasurably and profitably to all 
parties concerned, that urged, first by the 
earnest requests of the wide-awake proprietors 
of the west coast line of steamers, who for- 
warded free passes and orders for unlimited 
attention and provisions to us on all their 
boats, (which last was declined) ; and next by 
the extraordinary demand, and the tear and 
wear of the negatives, the trip was repeated 
next year; and surely never were two in- 
dividuals in the humble ranks of life treated 
so kindly and generously. It was a repetition 
of the experiences of Dr. Johnson and his 
henchman Boswell, or of that of Prince 
Charlie and his humblest adherents. Treat 
a Highlander as a suspected person and he 
will do you, as he thinks he is being done) 
treat him fairly, squarely, openly, and 
honestly, and he is your firmest friend ; but 
treat him generously and with confidence, 
and then, like the Israelites in the days of 
the Exodus, he will willingly submit to have 
his ear bored with an awl to the door post, 
and be your slave for ever; will treat with 
scorn the offer of any amount for your be- 
trayal, and like John Brown, will serve with 
all the devotion of a loyal heart. 

On this occasion, StafTa, so glorified by Dr. 
Johnson as a temple of the Great Architect 
of the universe, was the especial subject of 
study. After spending three days on Iona, 
having there Sandy Macdonald's cottage to 
ourselves, while the family adjourned to the 
barn, and one of the days being a Sabbath, 
when, as we often tantalisingly found to be the 
case in our travels, 

" Heaven for one day withdraws its ancient ban, 
Unbars its gates and dwells once more with man," 

very early next morning, in a four oared boat 
under Sandy's command, we were on our way, 
and when we reached Staffa : — 

' ' That hour the wind forgot to rave, 

The surge forgot its motion, 
And every pillar in thy cave 
Slept in its shadow on the wave, 

Unrippled by the ocean." 

It was a day of hard work, but of unmitigated 
delight. So accurately could Mr. Wilson 
judge the power of the actinic rays, and the 
potency of his chemicals, that although as is 



often the case, a brilliant morning is no guar- 
antee of a quiet afternoon, though clouds 
came crowding up from the west, and the 
light changed every hour, yet out of twenty- 
four negatives then taken, twenty-three were 
perfect. And for these, publishers would 
willingly have given him ^15 each, while 
they were worth far, far more to him. We 
would fain have continued our work, but 
Sandy warned us of an approaching gale, and 
we had to make haste to be gone. In the 
quiet morning our boatmen had to row all the 
way, which seemed merely over broad and 
gently undulating fields, but the sea had 
now become broken and choppy, and if the 
coming was monotonous, the return was 
exciting. Sail was speedily set, and in our 
boat we went bounding over the billows, in 
this manner : — 

" One side on high, one buried in the deep, 
Her deck to meet the ocean, slanting steep, 
Beneath the swelling sails, her mast bowed low, 
She mocks in speed the following breaker's flow. 
Back from her bows the broken waves are cast, 
And far behind her in the moving waste, 
A level track declares her well sped way, 
Where swiftly circling, sports the eddying spray," 

and reached Iona in safety. 

But in our excursions, it was not always 
fair sailing under favourable breezes. The 
photographer of that day had to work his 
way under conditions undreamt of by those 
of the present time ; just as Livingstone had 
painfully to penetrate through regions which 
railways will afterwards make easy to traverse. 

So much did Mr. Wilson do in opening up 
the Highlands to future travellers, that the 
difficulties and trials experienced by him, are 
now almost inconceivable. Districts now 
penetrated by railway, and with comfortable 
hotels, were then practically inaccessible, un- 
less to those who despised even ordinary 
comfort. In many out-of-the-way places we 
had to put up in hovels where drovers of 
cattle were the only customers, where the beds 
were extremely suspicious, and where in order 
to protect ourselves from the attacks of 
"jumpers," we had not only to spunge our- 
selves, but to sprinkle the very beds with the 
cheap, but extremely powerful whisky of the 
district. If the scenery was fascinating and 
our stay was thus prolonged, then the eggs, 



58 Brown's Book-Stall. 



TIM T \f encoura ^ e the protectionist "YANKEE" ^ ^ 
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\\ give as good value • • 

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Brown's Book-Stall. 



59 



and after that their producers, speedily dis- 
appeared from the district, and we had to 
depend for our very existence on dried 
venison, which required a hatchet to chop it 
up, and steam grinders to masticate it ; or we 
were treated to savoury sausages, very highly 
spiced, which in our tours of discovery were 
found to consist of " braxie mutton" — sheep 
found dead on the hills ! 

We owed our sustained vigour, nay but our 
very existence, to a careful, prudent, wise, and 
judicious use of the only medicine procur- 
able in the sparsely inhabited districts — a 
medicine which was thought to be the fatal 
foe of hurtful microbes, and the destructor of 
all harmful bacteria or baccilli, but all the 
same dangerous in itself. For an intelligent, 
enquiring physician, exploring this region 
found, that the nearest doctor being in very 
many cases, quite out of reach — was informed 
that the native recipe, either for comfort or 
discomfort, was one glass of whisky; for 
ailment, two; and for serious illness, three 
glasses; and if that did not cure, then the 
case was hopeless, and the patient, considered 
not worth preservation. He thought the 
practice very primitive and simple, but not 
much more so than that of the Scottish 
blacksmith, who, on his failure in Scotland, 
started as a doctor in the north of England, 
and in his invariable prescriptions used as he 
said, only two simples, " laudumy and 
calomey." Being told that these were most 
powerful medicines, and in many cases must 
have caused death, " Weel, weel," he said, 
" may be ! but it will tak' a lang time to mak' 
up for Flodden." 

But here the Editor cries " Halt," and an 
old volunteer instinctively stops. 



Local Apt. 



We have just published a picture 
_ of College Bounds, after a pen- 
and-ink drawing by a local artist. Size of plate 4AX7 inches, on 
plate paper with wide margin suitable for framing, price Sixpence. 



The College Bounds, Old Aberdeen, is a difficult subject for 
artistic treatment, but in the pen-and-ink sketch, of which Messrs. 
A. Brown & Co., Booksellers, Aberdeen, have just published a 
process reproduction, a strikingly pretty effect has been produced. 
The sketch — the work of a rising young artist — shows in the dis- 
tance the picturesque turrets at the entrance to Powis House. 
In the foreground effective use is made of trees, and the blank 
space of wall is cleverly broken by a solitary human figure and 
a group of pigeons. — Free Press. 

A. BROWN & CO., 77 Union Street. 



Books Mortb Busing, 



Adzttma, or the Japanese Wife. A play in four acts. 
By Sir Edwin Arnold, K.C.I.E. 



To be candid, I must confess that my acquaintance 
prior to the perusal of Adzuma with the works of one 
who certainly merits the distinction of being considered 
one of the foremost of our few really great poets was 
limited to a little fragment about "tiny slippers of 
gold and green, tied with a mouldering golden cord," 
which I came across in some old paper or another, and 
which so struck me at the time that I have often since 
wished for further opportunity of perusing Sir Edwin 
Arnold's poetry. Adzuma is hardly suited for repro- 
duction, at least on the English stage, nor is the plot 
entirely new, but as a poetic picture of life in Japan 
it has probably no equal. Into the story of Adztima, 
"the gentle patient faithful Nippon wife" of Wataru 
Watnabe, the author has woven an air of mysticism 
connected with her birth and that of Morito Endo, who 
ultimately slays her, while the introduction of Japanese 
phrases here and there throughout the poem — for it is 
a poem — gives it a flavour that is delightfully Eastern. 
What could be prettier than Adzuma's uta of the 
moon, which her maid naively tells her "everybody 
sings " ? — 

"Moon, of the Autumn sky 
Sentinel, silver and still, 

Where are the dear ones that die 
Is it well,— is it ill ? " 

The same sweet fragrance of another land rims 
through every page of the dainty little volume, and the 
wise man who once peruses the tragic story of this 
"foreign play" will find it one to which he will turn 
again and again, finding each time fresh beauties of 
prose and verse in Sir Edwin Arnold's delightful 
composition. 



The Squire. By Mrs. Parr. 

To those of you who can appreciate a little tragedy 
without the wholesale massacres of some recent fiction, 
I can recommend Mrs. Parr's latest novel. True, 
most of the characters in chapter one die natural 
deaths before we reach the end of chapter three, but as 
a new race springs up who continue the story, the loss 
of the first lot is not felt so much as might be expected. 
There is nothing unduly exciting either in plot or 
incident, but the tale is none the less interesting on 



6o 



B 



ROW 



n's Book-Stall. 



JOHN (DAGLEOD, 

Hittvbvcssci* attb ys>tvf timer, 
40 BRIDGE STREET, ABERDEEN. 



Ladies and Gentlemen's Wigs, Scalps, Scalpetts, and 
every description of Hair Work to order. 

COMBS, BRUSHES, BRITISH AND FOREIGN PERFUMERY. 

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8vo Crown, 205 //., SIXPENCE. 

"5n /Remorlam," 

For 1892, 

Containing 

Portraits and Biographical Notes of 
Prominent Citizens. 



OF ALL BOOKSELLERS. 

%\t %3mhm Steam f annbrjr, 

CLAREMONT STREET. 

(.TELEPHONE 190.) 

LAUNDRY W R K of every description from Town 

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best manner. 



CARPETS Beaten and Cleansed Thoroughly. 

Address— THE MANAGERESS, 

Claremont Street, ABERDEEN. 



WILLIAM BLAKE, 

funeral TUn&ertafter, 

Begs to intimate that he has now Removed from 
i Black's Buildings, to the more Central Shop, 

43 WOOLMANHILL 

(Opposite Royal Infirmary), 
where he will give his best attention to all branches 
of the Business as formerly. 



ALEXANDER GILL, 

SSUtxhmaker, Jctocllcr, nub (Optician, 
( S uSon S s h t?eef f ) Now 12 BRIDGE STREET, 

Gives special attention to the Repairing of all kinds of English 
and Foreign Watches — Chronometer, Repeater, Chronograph, 
&c. Also every description of Clock- Work. 

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Printers and Lithographers, 

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Bberoeen. 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries. 




Of Will, with directions for making, 3d. each. 
Forms of Affidavit and Claim, id. each. 
Cash Receipt Forms, 100 for 6d. Rent 
Receipt Forms, 100 for 6d. Instructions for 
Signing a Deed, 6d. per dozen. House 
Letting Agreements, 6d. per dozen. House 
Rulers, 6d. per dozen. Trust Deed Forms, 
6d. each. 



A. Brown & Co., 

Stationers, 

77 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



61 



that account, and should be particularly acceptable to 
those individuals who complain that the fiction of the 
"Fifteen men on the dead man's chest" school of 
authors gives them the nightmare — forgetting for the 
moment the indigestable supper that followed its 
perusal. The Squire is a fine healthy story, well told, 
and is sure to be a favourite with readers of the Book- 
Stall. Messrs Cassell & Co. are the publishers, so I 
need say no more on that head, while those of you 
whose eyesight is not what it used to be, but who, of 
course, don't require spectacles, will find the type to 
be irreproachable. 



Poems. By W. A. Mackenzie. 



In the reign of His Gracious Majesty James VI. of 
Scotland, there were certain laws known as the 
Statutes of Iona, the eighth of which was an enact- 
ment for the abolition of Bards "and other Idlers of 
that class." These have long since, however, been 
repealed, and once more the Poet runs wild amongst 
us. Of local Laureates we have lately had no lack — 
Anthony Mitchell sang of college life, Ronald 
Macfie mystified us with terrible sonnets, Arthur King 
occasionally made us laugh, but it has been reserved 
for Mr. Mackenzie to give us a volume which has 
really strong claims to be considered poetical. The 
Author is evidently a believer in quality rather than 
quantity, and has only given to the world the best 
productions of his prolific pen. That the " bookie" 
is of unequal merit was only to be expected ; some of 
the poems are really beyond the comprehension of an 
ordinary individual like myself, as, for instance, when 
the writer enquires 

" Do we unriply issue from the womb 
Of songless silence, that we hurry by 
The rhapsodies of Earth and Sea and Sky, 
And unmelodious jostle to the tomb? " — 

but again, what could be sweeter than his lines in part 
two " To Faerie," 

" Sleep, my Beloved ! The night shows fair, 

Soon shall the birds from the orchard's bounds 
Waken the world to its round of care, 
And its jarring din of a million sounds. 
Then the tempest of strife and incessant moil, 
And the hive-like hum of humanity's toil, 
Like breaking billows will only keep 
A broken time 
To the unheard chime 



Of my song that would still sing " Sleep, Love ! sleep, 

Sleep, my Beloved ! sleep ; 
While the golden stars and I stand guard, 
Wary to watch and faithful to ward, 

Sleep, my Beloved ! sleep." 

I have to ask the Author's pardon for quoting so 
extensively, but I could not feel it in my heart to mar 
the delightful cadence of the verse by curtailing it. 
Altogether Mr. Mackenzie's Poems is certainly one of 
the best local efforts it has been our pleasure to peruse. 
Messrs. J. Johnstone & Co., of Aberdeen, are the 
Publishers, and they have produced an artistic and 
elegant little volume of which our town may well be 
proud. We may just add that the volume is selling 
well, and as the edition is limited, those who wish to 
secure a copy had better do so now, else they will 
probably find it is too late. 



iooo Tit-Bits of Curious Information. 



This is certainly the most marvellous little volume 
I have come across for some considerable time. All 
sorts and conditions of questions are propounded and 
answered in it, and the individual who, after reading 
through its four hundred odd pages has still strength 
left to " ask another," ought to be placed under strict 
supervision as a person unfit to be at large among a 
harmless community. Do you want to know the 
number of bald-headed men in the Kingdom, or the 
country where tea is provided gratis to railway travel- 
lers (had it only been drinks wouldn't we just have 
emigrated!)? Are you inquisitive on the subject of 
which M.P. has been most frequently married, or what 
is the highest price ever paid for a perambulator ? Or 
is your mind bent on discovering the number of kilts 
made every year, or how many men in Great Britain 
wear wooden legs ? To all of these, as well as to 
several hundred others, this little cyclopaedia of quaint 
and curious information affords most interesting replies. 
I have looked in vain, however, for any notes on our 
Town Council Badges. Let the Editor see to this in 
his next edition, and his fortune's made as sure as my 
name's 

ST. JACK. 



Note :— The Editor requests that copies of books for review 
in this column, as well as periodicals to be noticed in our 
"Month's Magazine" page, be sent to J. G. R., Windermere 
House, 201 Albion Road, Stoke Newington, London, N. 



62 Brown's Book-Stall. 




VERYBQDY 

in want of good Stationery should call 
and see the bargains we offer in Note Paper and 
Envelopes. 

3/3 
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5 Quires Imperial Parchment with your Address printed, and 
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Brown's Book-Stall. 



63 



Ebis /l&ontb's /n>aGa3ines. 



April, 1893. 



There is one article in 
Longman 's this month which should be of exceptional 
interest to all Bookstall readers. I refer, of course, to 
Mr. Alfred Pollard's account of the First English 
Book Sale. This historic event, we are told, took 
place at nine o'clock on the morning of 31st October, 
1676, at the House of Dr. Lazarus Seaman in War- 
wick Court, Warwick Lane. The auctioneer was one 
Dr. Hill, but whom it was "who first who last 
upraised his voice to bid" the author is unable to tell 
us. The total sum realised was about .£700 ; the 
highest figure of the sale being fetched by a set o£the 
works of St. Chrysostum which sold for £8 5s, while 
the Bibliae Variae, as the Cataloguer — who must have 
been weak in his Latin — was pleased to call them, 
made a good second at £8 2s. The other articles in 
Longman's are all of the usual excellence, and I may 
just mention for the benefit of intending subscribers 
that a new volume begins next month. 



The New Revietv. The New for April opens with 
a most interesting series of articles on the all exciting 
question of Obstruction: what is it ? The Right Hon. 
Leonard Courtney who, as Mr Mellor's predecessor as 
Chairman of Committees, ought to know, leads off 
with the statement that it would be dangerous to 
attempt to define it. It certainly might for the Party of 
Law and Order just at present ! Sir Charles Dilke 
follows with a calm dispassionate article, while the 
Hon. A. B. Forwood, Mr. Justin McCarthy, Mr. 
Herbert Gladstone, Mr. C. B. Stuart Wortley, and 
Mr. J. E. Redmond also add their quota to the dis- 
cussion. But why are contributions from such past- 
masters in the art as Mr. Labouchere and Dr. Tanner 
omitted ? And it would also have been very 
interesting to know the opinions of Mr. Jimmy 
Lowther and Mr. Bartley on this interesting subject. 
There is also a capital "Character Study" of the 
Chief Secretary for Ireland, who at the present 
moment, as the writer says, is certainly the most 
important member of the Cabinet — save only his illus- 
trious Leader. 



Winter's Magazine. It isn't* fair to the Publishers, 
the Bookstall^ or myself. Some time ago, not being 
particularly interested in preserving a permanent 



record of the fact that " full sleeves of gold coloured 
velvet with ruffles of Honiton lace" were then 
fashionable, or that somebody or other wore a " dark 
blue speckled silk and a gold bonnet with magenta 
flowers," I sent my copy of this magazine to a lady 
friend — married of course — after I had duly studied 
it for review in these pages. I'll be wiser next time, 
for no sooner does the month approach a close than I 
get a little pathetic note reminding me that Winter s 
Magazine has not arrived yet, and " we all like it so 
much you know ! " What am I to do ? Three weeks 
at least of careful study is necessary for an uneducated 
male person before he can comprehend an article on 
ladies' dresses, and here am I expected to notice a 
magazine in which such intricate subjects as "a rose 
coloured satin with the seams outlined with a crystal 



The New Magazine 




THE FIRST NUMBER 
IS JUST OUT 



6 4 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



The day has come 

When competition compels us to make a 
Special Revised List of Prices in this 
branch of our Business. 



FUNERAL UNDERTAKING. 

£6 10/ - Polished Pine Coffins now for £4 4/- 

^10 10/- Polished Oak Coffins now for £6 6/- 

All with Brass Mountings. 
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Complete Arrangements for conducting 
Funerals in Town and Country. 

Every Requisite supplied at Lowest 
Wholesale Prices. 

Telegrams instantly attended to. 
Telephone 90. 



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The Town and County Funeral Undertaking 
Establishment, 

14 St. Paul Street, Aberdeen 

(Open Night and Day). 





0FFER every advantage to Purchasers of these 
Goods. Their Stock is supplied direct from 
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submit a comparison of Goods and Prices with those 
of any other house. 



IVORY-HANDLED TABLE CUTLERY. 



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21/- to 48/- 



IVORIDE-HANDLED CUTLERY. 



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Per Doz. 

12/- to 18/6 

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SILYER-FLATED SPOONS AND FORKS, 

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Dessert Spoons and Forks, ... 10/- to 30/- 
Table Spoons and Forks, ... 13/6 to 36/- 
Tea Spoons, 4/9 to 15/- 



26 I 28 BRIDGE STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



65 



galon and a Zouave in dark purple passementerie " 
— whatever in all the wide world that may be — are 
dealt with in a day or so's time. I think those of you 
who find these notes vague this month had better 
get a copy of Winter's for yourselves, and you will 
find it much more interesting than anything I might, 
could, or would, have said. 



The English Illustrated Magazine. This 
popular monthly begins very auspiciously its career 
under new management. As a preliminary the maga- 
zine has been enlarged in size without a corresponding 
increase in price. The contents also present a greater 
variety of matter without in any way deteriorating 
from the high standard of excellence set by English 
Illustrateds' of the past. Particularly interesting is 
the article by Albert Chevalier, the Laureate of the 
East, on "Costers and Music Halls," while Q.'s 
"Reviews and Reminders" take the place of what used 
to be to me a delightful corner of the magazine 
Mr. H. D. Traill's ' ' Et Ccetera " Notes. Altogether the 
English Illustrated makes an excellent start. May it 
go on and prosper is my benediction. 



The Theatre. The April number is a particularly 
strong one, both in the matter of illustration and 
text. The place of honour is given to a very clever 
and amusing article on Mr. Jones' recent play "The 
Bauble Shop," which is doing big business at 
the Criterion. In it the writer points out some 
remarkable resemblances which the play bears to our 
old friend " Caste," and Mr. Pineros' Comedy, " The 
Times," which has not yet, I think, reached Aber- 
deen. There is a very pathetic little tale by Forbes 
Bell, while both photos, and other illustrations equal, 
if they do not surpass, those of the best of former 
numbers. 



The Strand Magazine. It is rather difficult to say 
anything new about the Strand. The magazine is 
always so eminently readable that the most captious 
critic could hardly but find pleasure in its pages. The 
"Sherlock Holmes" series; the chatty and descrip- 
tive Parliamentary Articles by H. W. Lucy, and the 
excellent translations of the works of foreign writers, 
not to mention the interesting Portrait Gallery of 
Celebrities at different ages, and other excellent illus- 
trations, are all features which combine to give it a 
foremost place among really popular magazines. But 
why doesn't the Editor give us a serial story for a 



change ? I am sure there are a large number of 
admirers of the Strand who would hail with satis- 
faction such an additional attraction to its already 
highly attractive pages. 



Messrs. Casscll 6° Co } s Publications. To take these 
singly would require a special number of the Book- 
Stall, and though the Editor would rather go without 
his dinner for a week than wilfully disappoint anyone, 
yet, with the thought of the coming "flittin"' before 
him, he doesn't quite see his way to such an extension 
of business as this would imply just at present. What- 
ever your wants and desires may be, Messrs. Cassell & 
Co. have a periodical on the subject which will suit 
you. If, like me, you are so fond of work that you 
let it accumulate and wouldn't think of touching it for 
the world, there is Work, a periodical which will tell 
you all about the making of cabinets and cradles, and 
things which sometimes come in useful. Then if you 
are interested in "Gerard Dows and Zoffanies," and 
Art generally and particularly, you can read the Maga- 
zine of Art which contains all the latest doings in the 
World of Painting and Sculpture. While on this 
subject I may just mention that the special numbers 
dealing with the year's Academy pictures are again to 
be published in a more complete form even than 
formerly. Or it may be you are going to Chicago if the 
water is not too shallow for your special steamer ? If 
so, Messrs. Cassell & Co. are just issuing in monthly 
parts a work on that interesting City, which will tell 
you all about it and the World's Fair, and everything 
else pertaining thereto that you could posssibly wish to 
know. . . . But the vision of an irate Editor 
waiting for his "Copy" warns me that this month's 
chronicle must now close. 

ST. JACK. 

Other magazines received — The Idler, Atalanta, 
Great Thoughts, The Picture Magazine, etc. 

COMB, BRUSH, & SPONGE WAREHOUSE 



AUGUSTUS H. DoWSONj 

fjair Cutter, perfumer, 

LADIES' HEAD DRESSER & ORNAMENTAL HAIR MANUFACTURER 
39 ROSEMOUNT VIADUCT, 

(Three Doors from Skene Street), 

ABERDEEN. 

Families and Schools attended. Lessons in Hair Dressing 
Ladies' Combings made up in any Style. 



66 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



An. 



Expedition of Wo^ingmen 

is to be sent to the 

^^^orlcTs Bair, 

— — Chicago, 



on a 



Tour of Observation. 



All Expenses to be defrayed 
by the 

Weekly News Proprietors. 



The selection of Members for the Expedition 
will be made by POPULAR VOTE. 



Read full particulars in the Weekly News, 
and get your Voting Papers filled up and sent on 
without delay to the 

Director, Workingmen's Expedition, 
Weekly News Office, 

18 Adelphi, Aberdeen. 

Hug Dressing and Dyeing. 

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^M HK0^ Deer Skins Dressed and Manufactured 

*4Br^PW into Hearth and Hall Rugs. Old Mats 

&Bjt f Cleaned, Re-dyed, and made equal 

I^L to new. It is important that these 

l^lLs^ goods should be sent to the Actual 

Manufacturer ; in order that they may receive immediate 

and proper attention. 



Alexander Laing, 

Rodders Walk, John Street, Aberdeen 



^£X ABERDEEN x^, 

(Downing Establishment. 



beg to intimate that in taking over the Business 
of James Gordon & Son fully two years ago, 
I then added Coloured Dress Goods, which 

has proved a great success ; and with a view to 
increase the development, I have just visited London 
and other Leading" Centres, and having made 
careful selections, I am now prepared to show a 
Range of 

Lovely Coloured Dress Materials, including New 
Corduroys, Shot Serges, Whipcords, Shot Diagon- 
als, &c. 

Pattern Millinery Bonnets and Hats. 

The Latest and Confirmed Styles in Mantles, Jackets, 
Capes, Blouses, and Jerseys. 

Novelties in Flowers, Feathers, Ornaments, Ribbons, 
Laces, Veils, Veilings, &c, &c. 

A Choice Lot of Furs, Victorines, Long Victorias, 
and Squirrel Boas, to be cleared now at Summer 
Prices. 

A Splendid Selection of Umbrellas and Sunshades. 

MANTLE and DRESS MAKING receive most careful 
attention, and Patrons may always rely on getting not only the 
Newest Styles, but also Perfect Fit at most Moderate Prices. 

The favour of a Personal Visit to inspect the Stock, without 
the necessity of purchasing, is respectfully solicited. 



D. J. Campbell, 

(Late James Gordon & Son), 

44 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 

WATSON'S * * 




China 
Stores, 



106 & 108 Qallooigate. 



Cheapest Place in the City for Glass, China, and 
Earthenware, Majolica, Jet, an / General 
Fancy Goods. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



67 



The State of Agriculture in 
Aberdeenshire in 1778. 



From '■'■Present State of Husbandry in Scotland" 
Edinburgh, 1784. 



Continued from February Number. 

I called upon Mr. Angus, late bookseller in Aberdeen ; 
for men of all ranks here are struck with the enthus- 
iasm of farming ; and in no place of the known world 
is such enthusiasm more necessary than about the town 
of Aberdeen. This gentleman obtained in a feu, 
some miles from the town, about 40 acres of the same 
stony muir, and pays a very high feu-duty, no less 
than £2$ Sterling. I met him in the fields attending 
his labourers carrying off stones. The largest stones 
were carried off in a slip, drawn by four stout oxen, 
much larger than what are commonly bred in this country. 
This improver is not only full of enterprise, but skil- 
ful in conducting his operations in the best manner. 
As trenching with spade and mattock is slow and 
expensive, Mr. Angus turned his thoughts upon doing 
it with the plough. He began with clearing the 
ground from every large stone upon the surface and 
under it, which work alone cost him ,£10 Sterling per 
acre. He then set to work a strong plough drawn by 
six capital oxen, and took so deep a furrow as to be 
equal to a trenching. 

The estate of Robslaw, that not many years ago 
was rented at no more but ^"ioo Sterling yearly, is 
rented now at ;£6oo ; not by the industry of the 
proprietor, but by its vicinity to the town, which 
engaged the citizens to take feus and long leases at an 
advanced rent. 

Mr. Mossman, advocate in Aberdeen, has an estate 
about three miles from Aberdeen, originally as barren 
as any about the town. As pasture was his object, he 
began to fence with good stone dikes and stripes of 
planting round every enclosure, very comfortable in 
this cold climate. In this way 50 acres are finished 
and set to a substantial tenant, for 19 years, at 40s. 
per acre, upon the following conditions. After 
pasturing five years, one crop of oats, another of 
barley with grass-seeds, to be pastured five years, two 
crops of corn as before, and then to be pastured dur- 
ing the remainder of the lease. The felling of hay is 
prohibited. With a rent so high, more advantageous 
terms for the landlord could not be demanded. The 
only objection made to this mode of cropping is, that 
there is no care for preventing couch-grass ; but the 
nature of the soil is such, as to give no encouragement 



to that weed. There is another objection, that 
appears to me much more formidable, which is, that 
the tillage necessary for the two crops of oats and 
barley, will not pulverise the soil sufficiently for grass- 
seeds, nor eradicate the roots of many noxious weeds 
that will get footing in the ground. 

Were a traveller in his wanderings to come upon 
any farmer in the neighbourhood of Aberdeen com- 
mencing his improvements upon this stony barren 
muir, he would, without the least hesitation, pro- 
nounce the poor man to be crazy. Any one would 
think so with respect to the first improver ; but now 
the certainty of success makes it a rational system for 
gain, and spreads the improvement of that muir wider 
and wider every day. At present, as far as one can 
cast his eye round Aberdeen, there is not a vestige of 
the muir remaining. 

Mr. Paton of Grandholm encourages his tenants 
not only by kindness, but by example. He gives 
leases for 19 years, much longer than is ordinary in 
that country, and at moderate rents. Thus he com- 
bines his own interest with that of his tenants, and 
both with the good of his country. Mr. Paton 
originally was none of those sanguine improvers who 
make every convenience of life yield to the plough. 
He began with erecting a neat house and proper 
offices, and then proceeded to smooth the ground 
round his house, and to lay it down in grass. He 
now advances outward, and has begun to take in a 
muir of great extent, little better than that about 
Aberdeen, except that the stones upon it are less 
numerous. He has adopted the method above des- 
cribed, of opening the ground with a strong plough, 
which pierces from fourteen to eighteen inches deep. 
He employs in this operation no fewer than ten good 
oxen. His apology for such a number is not that 
they are absolutely necessary for so deep a furrow, 
but that they relieve one another by taking up the 
draught by turns. Mr. Paton would not be capable 
of reasoning in this way, but from the prepossession ot 
custom. To leave oxen to pull or not, according to 
their own discretion, would be a very imperfect way 
of relieving one another. I have often seen 10 oxen 
in a plough in the counties of Aberdeen and Banff; 
but I never once saw them pulling all together. One 
or other of them are seen hanging on the yoke, keep- 
ing back the draught, insteading of advancing it. 
Would it not be more rational to imitate Mr. Angus's 
draught of six oxen only, and to change them at times 
with the other four. Every clod and every stone on 
the surface being torn up with the brake harrow, and 
carried off, the field is cross ploughed with the same 
strong plough, and again braked as before. Thus, in 



68 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Now is the time, 





when the ''spring cleaning" discovers all the back 
numbers and parts of magazines, 



To post a card 



to Mr. Jackson, 18 Back Wynd, Aberdeen, or telephone 
No. 291, and he will send for them to be bound. 



Buy your SKKDS and other Requisites 
for the Garden at the 






EED-JBTM, 



11 Bridge jftfeet, Aberdeen. 

Cardno & Darling. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



69 



the course of two years, this barren muir is well 
pulverised. And now being divided into ridges 15 
feet broad, it is limed at the rate of 30 bolls of shells, 
Linlithgow measure, upon each acre, at no small ex- 
pence, 2s 6d. per boll at the shore, beside carriage. 
The first crop is black oats, about four bolls per acre. 
All the dung that can be procured is laid on as a 
preparation for the next crop, which is turnip, after 
two or three ploughings, kept clean by hand-hoeing. 
As no weeds can yet get footing in this new soil, drill- 
ing and horse-hoeing seems unnecessary. The turnip 
are employed in stall-feeding oxen. Beer or oats 
with grass seeds make the third crop. I recommend- 
ed white clover, ribwort, trefoil, and ryegrass, for 
bringing on a close sward, to be rolled two or three 
times after appearing above ground. In such loose 
soil, rolling at intervals is in a manner essential for 
preserving the tender roots from drought in summer, 
and from rain and frost in winter. I advised him to 
leave out red clover, to which this soil would not be 
friendly. The expence of improving this muir, the 
stone inclosures included, is about £8 per acre. 
The stones all about Aberdeen are true granite, which 
being carried to London in great quantities for paving 
the streets, proved a great relief to the farmer. That 
article of commerce still continues ; but it is much 
more confined, as no stones are now demanded but of 
the largest size, fit for lining the sides of the cause- 
ways. 

Mr. Hugh Lesly, son to Professor Lesly in the Old 
College of Aberdeen, while he applies diligently to 
his studies at college, employs every spare hour in 
attending to various branches of improvement on 
his father's estate, which, fortunately for him, is within 
a quarter of an hour's walk of the college. His first 
attempt was difficult, a rich spot of low lying ground, 
into which springs from the higher grounds constantly 
flowed. Drains were so disposed as to cut off the 
springs on the sides of the bank, and to lead them 
all into a main drain, which laid the whole dry and fit 
for cultivation. There is but upon one part a plenti- 
ful crop. Grass-seeds were sown with the lint, which 
he learnt from the Gentleman Farmer, and succeeds 
wonderfully. Mr. Lesly intended to save the seed, I 
advised him to stack the sheaves with the top outmost, 
and to cover the stalk well, to prevent rain from 
penetrating. Thus the bows are soon dried, and the 
seed secured, which is a valuable article. Mr. Lesly 
has informed me of his success, and of his having 
saved a great quantity of good seed. His crop of 



bear is good, and is ready to be cut this 10th of 
August. His turnip broadcast is excellent, and he 
expects eight guineas the acre from the town's people, 
they pulling and carrying off at their own expence. 

Beautiful and uncommon appearances around a 
small, but neat house, drew my attention. Unequal 
surfaces, some high, some higher, shelving banks, and 
a small valley through which a purling stream steals 
gently. Stepping into gratify my curiosity, a serpent- 
ine walk led me to a pretty little garden, decorated 
with flowers and useful plants. The shubbery was 
fine, a grotto, a temple, a hermitage, in proper 
sequestrated places, every clump and single tree 
placed to advantage, and form upon the whole a very 
entertaining group. I stood involved in contempla- 
tion ; and wishing to know the proprietor, who must 
be a man of singular taste, was told that it was Mr. 
Lesly, a citizen of Aberdeen, at present in trade, but 
about to give up the bustle of business, and to retire 
in quiet to his rural habitation. 

John Auldjo, a most respectable citizen, and 
eminent in the mercantile line, entered deeply into an 
extensive brick and tile work, which he carries on 
with great success, his bricks and tiles being in high 
estimation all the country round. His success in 
trade enabled him to purchase an estate on the side of 
the river Dee ; the soil is tolerable, but in a state of 
nature. He began with the best of the common 
modes of husbandry, and got pretty good returns. 
But not satisfied, he has entered into a superior plan 
of cultivation. I pass the mode of fallow, turnip, 
potatoe, etc., familiar with every improver, confining 
myself to what is new. Having opportunity of plenty 
of bark from a neighbouring tannage, his method is 
to mix it with the horse dung hot from the stable, 
heaped up to a considerable height. A very slow 
fermentation commences, which is not finished in less 
than six months. Then the heap is turned over, and 
the parts intimately mixed, which brings on a second 
fermentation, which lasts other six months, and then 
becomes a rich manure fit for use. Of this manure, 
40 or 50 cart loads are laid on an acre, each cart hold- 
ing little more than 2.\ bolls Linlithgow measure, as a 
preparation for bear or bigg, mixed with the soil by 
two ploughings. Grass-seeds sown with the bear thrive 
wonderfully. At a neighbouring fisher town are 
brought in immense quantities of the fish called sea- 
dog. They are valued for the oil only that is extract- 
ed from their liver. Mr. Auldjo purchases what is 
left at a very moderate price ; and they prove a 



7° 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



Campbell & Company, 

Successors to CAMPBELL, ACHNACH, & Co., 

INDIA RUBBER & WATERPROOF 
MANUFACTURERS, 

18 BRIDGE STREET, 
ABERDEEN, 

Show one of the Largest and most Select Stocks in 

■COaterproof, Hirproof, aitb 

-*=* Jn&fa=1Rut>bec (Boofcs. 



§igh»Glass tailoring 

AT ECONOMICAL PRICES. 



KENNETH MACLEAN & SON, 

83 Lambs Conduit Street, 

LONDON, w.c, 

AND 

17 BRIDQZ STREET, 



CHOICEST GARMENTS FOR LADIES & GENTLEMEN, 
In most Fashionable Styles, Newest Patterns & Select Designs. ' 

SPORTING and FISHING REQUISITES 

In Great Variety. 

Carriage Aprons, Lorry Covers, Cart and 
Loin Covers. 

DOOR & CARRIAGE INDIA-RUBBER MATS 

Made to iny Size and Design on the shortest notice. 

India-Rubber Sheet, Insertion, Valves, Packing, 
Washers, Hose Pipes, Belting, &c. 

Sole Agents for ABERDEEN and NORTH for 

The Argyle Rubber Co.'s New Patent Rubber 
Foot Grip, used for Golf, &c. 



^Departments. 



3nspection Hespectfullv Solicited. 



PLEASE NOTE THE ADDRESS- 

CAMPBELL & GOMPANY, 

uccessors to CAMPBELL, ACHNACH, & Co. 

i8, BRIDGE STREET, 18 



Uniforms. 


Ladies' Habits. 


Liberies. 


Gostumes. 


Glericcl Suits. 


Jackets 


&c, &c. 


Ulsters. 




UR SCOTCH BRANCH being 
under the management of one of the 
k 5) Partners who has had many years' 
practical experience of the London Trade, 
and being in daily communication with our 
London House, we are enabled to guarantee 
Excellence of Fit and Latest LONDON 
STYLES. 



TWEED SUITS, from £3 3 

DRESS SUITS, Silk Lined, ... 5 5 

OVERCOATS, 2 10 

TROUSERS, ... 18 



5 per cent. Discount for Cash. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



71 



valuable manure when prepared in the following 
manner. A large hole is made in the earth three or 
four feet deep. The bottom is covered with the upper 
stratum of a peat moss, unfit for burning, 12 inches 
thick ; then a stratum of fish, and so alternately till 
the hole is filled up ; the upmost stratum being close 
and thick, to prevent dogs, etc. , from tearing out the 
fish and eating them. This is done from July to 
September, when the capture of that fish is most 
successful. In January or February this compost is 
turned over and well mixed, and makes an excellent 
manure for bear and bigg, 30 or 40 cart loads, as 
above, being laid on an acre. The bear is always a 
good crop. Sometimes pease succeed ; but he gener- 
ally takes an oat crop ; for in this part of the world 
the practice of intermixing green crops is little known. 
The excellence of this compost may be known from 
the rich crops of turnip it produces, even when taken 
after the two white corn crops, which will afford much 
more food to the poor people than the fish itself would 
do, were it even eatable. 



The Aberdeen Year-Book for 1892 : 

Leading Events of the Year; Trade Reports ; 
Biographical Notices, etc. Free Press 

Office, 1893. 



For fully sixty years past, the history of the braif 
toon during an unexampled period of activity, of 
intelligence and of progress, which has entirely altered 
the appearance of the city, has increased the number 
of its inhabitants nearly six-fold, and materially 
changed it in every respect — has to be sought for — 
where ? and the recurring echo of more than half-a- 
century of years only repeats — where? 

Rip-Van-Winkle-like, after awaking from the long 
sleep, and desirous to know what has been taking 
place during their long slumber, are the intelligent 
citizens of Aberdeen content to take their ideas of 
the place from Douglas (1782), Walter Thorn (181 1), 
Kennedy's Annals (1818), or Wilson's Delineation, 
published about the same time? Are they to be 
content with the very meagre sketches to be found in 
the local guide books or those skeleton details in 
cyclopaedias — even the best of them ? 

Nearly two generations have had to be content with 
these old and musty rations, which are both unprofitable 
and unsatisfactory. 



The whole period of sixty years is as unknown a 
country as an African jungle, where every explorer has 
to cut and find his own way almost unassisted. At 
one time indeed, the newspaper press was in the habit 
of giving once a year a record of local occurrences, 
and a list of deaths ; which, poor and insignificant 
though it was, was better than nothing, and was 
greatly prized and carefully preserved by some, when 
all the rest of the paper was allowed to be destroyed. 
But even this was given up ; the rushing tide of the 
present obliterated the ripples on the sand, and the 
hurry-burry bustle of this week so prominently 
placarded, knocked the events of the previous week 
into limbo and such utter oblivion, that only those 
who have tried to penetrate the jungle with penknives, 
or to find their way in the Cimmerian darkness with 
such farthing rush-light can understand the difficulty 
in making sure their footsteps, or in safely pointing 
out the path to those who follow and who desire to 
know what is what, and who is who. 

But if in the times of this ignorance the intelligent 
citizens not only winked at it, but snoringly slumbered 
over it ; all the more should they welcome and 
encourage such publications as the "In Memoriam," 
compiled and published by William Cay & Sons with its 
obituary notices and its numerous portraits. Shadowy 
though some of these are, how thankfully they are 
received by friends and relatives ; helping the poor, 
feeble, fleeting memory to retain the lineaments of 
dear ones " not lost but gone before." It is a valuable 
contribution to local history, and deserves to be largely 
bought and lovingly preserved. 

"The Year-Book " has a wider scope and is all the 
more welcome, as it contains a " Diary of Local 
Events" and valuable resumes of " The Year's Trade," 
and an account of the " Local Publications," in 
additions to biographical notices of deceased citizens, 
which if not all of equal merit, are worthy of pre- 
servation in this modest Pantheon, instead of being 
almost cremated in the columns of the paper. 

Of the 136 pages, no less than 50 are occupied with 
notices, of the opening of the Infirmary, of the Home 
Industries Exhibition, and the unveiling of the Burns' 
Statue ; but strange to say the opening of the Free 
Library and the interesting proceedings in connection 
with it are dismissed in four lines ; while in the 
notices of books the issue of 10,000 copies of "A 
Manual for Readers," by Mr. Robertson, is entirely 
ignored to the surprise of the reading public. 

Notwithstanding this, the compilers of the Year- 
Book have conferred a boon on the public, and 
specially on all students of history, by the publication. 



72 Brown's Book- Stall. 



TRY. 



LittlejoKrx & SorVs 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. LiTTLEJOHN & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 




7 ^V<; Telephone 579. 



123 Union Street" 



:;?.- . 



&rm£ ^gor^\ohs. 



^rHE Novelty and Variety of the Designs for 
■*■ this Season are unequalled. 



Artistic Pongee Drapings, Draped Rush Work — an Entire Novelty, 
New Series of Japanese Make, Fresh Arrangements of Palm 
Leaves, and other New Patterns. A Splendid Range is now 
being shown in our SPECIAL SHOW-ROOM. 

Flower Pot Covers, Uva, Pampas, and other Grasses, 
Decorative Fans a7id Sundries. 



COLLIE & TAYLOR. 



BEJ1. HEID & CO., Bon-Aeeord Works, Aberdeen, 

Have just received their Season's Stock of Lawn Mowers — over 100 Machines 
to choose from. A call solicited. 



Uhc y^rns* chief 



Celebrated / / Advantages. 

" EXCEIiSIOB " //• Lightness of Draught. 

Iiaian (Domer, /^% slmpMy of Construction ' 

' ^C^s^/ W111 CUt BaDkS aDd S1 ° PeS ' 

Acknowledged to be ^*gS2m fill Cut High GrdSS. 

THE BEST MACHINE V^^^^&MSMg^fi '-' 

in the Market. ""^Sli^PHpP^ Suitable for Use by Ladies. 

SPECIAL -DISCOUNT FOR CASH. 

GARDEN SEATS. GARDEN SEATS. 

A Large Selection of the Latest and most Artistic Designs always kept in stock. 



Show Rooms— Guild Street and Exchange Street. 




BY APPOINTMENT IN ORDINARY W^^Smp^ T0 THE QUEEN< 

John Blaikie & Sons, 

;©ra3iers, ^©ell attb ^@raas ;Mount>ers, 

PLUMBERS, GHSPITTERS, COPPERSMITHS, <k„ 

Manufacturers of EVenj Description of Brass arvd Gopper Work 
for Distillers, BreWers, Engineers, plumbers, &c, 

LITTLEJOHN STREET METAL WORKS, 

AND 

218 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 



GOLD MEDAL Awarded for Special Excellence. 



BY HER MAJESTY'S 




ROYAL LETTERS PATENT. 



"The Queen of all Table Drinks!' 



FORBES, MAXWELL, & CO.'S 

GflAjMGNE GINGER BEER 



AS been pronounced by 1,000 of Scotland's 
most eminent Medical Men to be the only 
perfect Health-Preserving Table Drink— a thousand 
times superior to Aerated Waters and Fermented 
Beverages. The patented process of manufacture 
protects the consumer from the dangerous effects of 
lead and other metallic poisons. 

Most suitable for mixing with Wines and Spirits. 
The most welcome friend in every sick room, and 
indispensable on every table. Try it once and you 
will never be without it. 




TO BE HAD FROM ALL GROCERS AND CHEMISTS. 

Caution. — Do not be imposed upon. Beware of 
spurious imitations and the fraudulent use of 
this title. The Patentees and Sole Makers are 



MAXWELL, I (Jo.. Ltd.. Aberdeen 




Published at yy Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. 



MAY. 



1893. 



THE 



COLONIAL MUTUAL 

Life Assurance Society Limited. 



OFFICES: 33 POULTRY, LONDON, E.C. 

Manager: EDWARD W. BROWNE, F.S.S. 



Funds Exceed . . • . ,£1,450,000. 
Annual Income Exceeds ,£400,000. 



POLICIES UNCONDITIONAL, UNCHALLENGEABLE, INDEFEASIBLE. 

residence and travel in any part of the world. 

tontine policies issued combining insurance with investment 
at Whole Life and Endowment Rates. 



ORDINARY ENDOWMENT POLICIES at Moderate Premiums, payable in 15, 
20, 25, 30, or 35 years, or in event of previous death. 

EXAMPLE— 

At age 25, a Policy for ,£500 with profits, payable at 55 or previous death, can 
be secured by an annual payment of £15 1 8. 

CHILDREN S ENDOWMENT— NEW PLAN 

Endowment Policies, payable at age 14 or 21 — Premiums ceasing on the death of Parent 
or Guardian. These Policies form a convenient means of providing funds for a Marriage 
Portion for a Daughter, or for a University Education or Indenture Fee for a Son. 

Apply for Prospectus and Table of Rates to 

34 Bridge Street, Aberdeen. 

CHARLES A. BODIE, District Inspector. 



ELE CTROPLAT ING. 

W ILLIA~M BAI N, 

The Northern Machine Warehouse, 
Principal Offiee-9 BRIDGE STREET, Aberdeen. 

BRANCH-12 GREAT WESTERN ROAD. 

City Cycle and Plating Works-98 COLLEQE STREET, and at NEWCASTLE. 

EIiECTflO-PMTIfliT'"^"^ PlaterS) careful 

—j and promptly executed in Household Plate, Cycles &c 

SATISFA CTION GUAR ANTEE D, BR ING A TRIAL ORDER 

CYCLES.— The °"'y Warehouse for a Large Selection . 

SEWING MACHINES.-nnest hand machines 

KNITTING MACHINES. PERAMBULATORS. MAIL CARTS. MANGLES. WRINGERS 
PARTS FOR ALL CYCLES AND SEWING MACHINES 

Repairs, Enamelling, and Electro-Plating 



Waterproof 




•** Yaieed ©oats, Capes, and Mantles. 

DANISH KID JACKETS. 

SURGICAL AND LAWN TENNIS GOODS. 

(Slaostone ano other travelling Bags. 

HORSE LOIN, LORRY, AND STACK COVERS. 
RUBBER HOSE. MATS AND SHEETINQ, BELTINq, 5 C . 

FINDLAY & CO,, 

96 anion Street, Aberdeen. 




No. 17. 



MAY. 



1893. 



Brown's Hberfceen Boofe^StalU 



No. XVII. 



IN MEMORIAM: G. W. WILSON. 

(Continued. ) 

" His ears are shut from happy sound : 

His eyes are softly sealed : 
The oft-trod, old familiar ground, 

The hill, the wood, the field ; 
The path which most he loved that runs 

Far up the shining river, 
Through all the course of summer suns 

He treads no more for ever." 

"A little row of Naphtha lamps with its line of 
Naphtha lights, burns clear and holy through the dead 
Night of the Past : they who are gone are still here ; 
though hidden, they are revealed, though dead, 
they yet speak." — Carlyle. 



"0 



NCE on a time," as the story goes, a 
bold and bluff Scottish sea captain, 
regaling himself with his usual compan- 
ions in the accustomed houff in a small town 
on the Fifeshire coast, was interrupted in the 
midst of a story by his mate telling him that his 
vessel was ready to sail. He stopt his story 
at the most interesting point, joined the ship, 
voyaged almost round the world, came back 
after many months absence, and on his arrival, 
he went back to the old place, found all the 
old companions in their accustomed places, 
and lighting his pipe, resumed the broken 



thus 



Well, as I 



thread of his discourse 
was saying," etc. 

So, after the lapse of a month, the writer 
resumes in the words of the captain — "as I 



was saying," our journeys were not all fair 
sailing. No, indeed ! no porters were await- 
ing us at our termini, ready and anxious to 
assist us with our luggage, which, as it con- 
tained neither dress-shirts, nor toggery for 
parties, but ample supplies of collodion, glass 
plates and chemicals, along with the camera, 
and a portable tent, was somewhat formidable. 
So different was our luggage from what was 
usual, that it attracted great attention in the 
Highland districts, and begat no little wonder- 
ment by many parties as what occupation we 
followed, and what the luggage consisted of. 
On one occasion, having done Elgin Cathedral 
to our satisfaction, we travelled by the last 
train to Craigellachie, having as a fellow- 
passenger, a proprietor of one of the numer- 
ous distilleries of the district. He was in 
that happy condition that the cabman in 
Punch who envied the half of a very drunk 
man's disease, might have envied the whole 
of it. He was simply brilliant, had all his 
wits about him, and his tongue wagged at the 
rate of fifty miles an hour, " whisky and 
freedom ganging together." He used great 
freedom of speech to us, and seeing us 
examining some of the two-ounce bottles of 
collodion, he demanded to know what we 
were, and our business in the district. He 
was not easily satisfied, but on being waggishly 
told that we were agents for the sale of 
French brandies and claret, of which the small 
bottles contained samples, he seized one of 
the bottles, and it was with some difficulty 
that we prevented him from gulping the 
contents. He then insisted on our ac- 
companying him to his home in Glenfarklass, 



74 



Brown's Book- Stall. 




Established 1830. 



W.S J. Walker, 

Umbrella 

Man ufacturers, 

98 Union Street, 

Aberdeen. 



IPictures and Painters of 1893, 

An Illustrated Guide to the Royal Academy and the other chief picture exhibitions, being 
the Fine Art Supplement of "The Strand Magazine" and "The Picture Magazine/' 
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Brown's Book-Stall. 



75 



where he declared, that with the native pro- 
duct, he would make us much more victorious, 
happy, and glorious, o'er all the ills of 
life, than with all the contents of our 
bottles we could possibly be. Even when 
told our real occupation, the invitation was 
not retracted, and it stands good still, and 
will always stand as a specimen of Highland 
hospitality. 

Photographing was then the pursuit of 
pictures under difficulties. The very impedi- 
menta required two individuals to carry it, 
and we were only too glad to secure a third 
whenever we could. But many a weary 
tramp " o'er moors and mosses mony o," had 
we by ourselves, and that ungrudgingly. The 
fatigue, the poor accommodation, and the 
sometimes scanty fare, were all soon for- 
gotten when we came into comfortable 
quarters in the midst of beautiful surround- 
ings. With the collodion process, the absolute 
cleanliness of the glass slides was of the very 
first importance. There was a knack in cleaning 
them, in holding the slide by a pneumatic 
apparatus so as not to expose even a corner 
to the grease of the human hand, which the 
writer could never acquire. And on this 
occasion, after the unwonted exposure to the 
open air, the hard days work at Elgin, the 
night journey to Craigellachie, the weary and 
dangerous tramp through the pitchy darkness 
from that to the humble hostelry kept by the 
well-known " Cum-a-rashie," the return from 
thence again with a hand cart to the station 
to bring all our baggage to our lodgings; 
when after all this, notwithstanding his weari- 
ness, Mr. Wilson had to sit late into the 
night carefully cleaning the plates for the next 
day's work, and smilingly telling his awkward 
companion to go to bed, and be ready to help 
him next day ; then never was the writer more 
ashamed at his own awkwardness, or more 
deeply impressed with a sense of the un- 
selfish, loving, and generous character of his 
companion. These traits in his character 
came out more and more the longer he was 
known, and of him it may be said that the 
most intimate companion will invariably 
esteem him the highest. 

Then, if the reader is not wearied, as he 
may well be with the recital of these minor 



trials, which however bulk largely in the sum 
of human existence, it must be mentioned 
that there were others still more minor, 
almost infinitesimal, very seldom thought of 
or taken into account, which materially in- 
terfered with our comfort and enjoyment. 
When on the deck of one of our splendidly 
equipped West Coast steamers, the delighted 
traveller passes through the Kyles of Bute, 
through Loch Awe, or along the Caledonian 
Canal, he is charmed with the mountains 
clothed in their purple heather, with the 
lowly, lovely glens which penetrate the 
country, with the rocky islets, the ruined 
castles, the gay looking villages at which the 
steamer touches, and the snug-like residences 
which stud the shores. The Fiords of 
Norway may be more savagely grand, the 
Italian Lakes may be more gently beautiful, 
the much be-praised Rhine, from Cologne to 
Mayence, may be more fashionable, but any 
Scotchman, aye or Englishman, coming back 
from the sight of these, and bespattering 
them with praise, while he has not seen the 
Scottish West Coast, ought at least to be 
hanged, drawn, and quartered for high treason 
to his country, whatever else he might be 
sentenced to. 

But in the West Highlands there is one 
serious drawback to the pleasure of photo- 
graphing, and that a most irritating one to 
thin-skinned individuals who live in towns, in 
the myriads of midges which fill the air, and 
settle in clouds on all who invade their 
haunts, and torture them. After a day's 
operations in the recesses of the Trosachs 
every exposed inch of skin on our bodies was 
covered with blisters, and on one occasion in 
Skye, when attempting to develop the nega- 
tives by the side of a little rivulet, the swarms 
were so dense as to drive us away in despair. 
We could find no effective defence from their 
attacks, though the application of ammonia 
relieved the pain. Hear what a recent writer 
in Temple Bar says on this subject : — 

"Amid scenes of the greatest beauty the surround- 
ings are not wholly of Paradise. With conditions 
so very favourable for their enjoyment of life, 
the midges may be expected in myriads. They 
are, in fact, infernal. They gyrate in thick circles 
round the head, singing and stinging at their pleasure ; 
and battalions of them find a way up the tightest of 



76 Brown's Book-Stall. 



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77 



sleeves. Even our dog can get no rest, snapping at 
them, despatching them by mouth fuls, but making no 
impression on their numbers. The infliction is as bad 
as any of the Ten Plagues, and tobacco is only a very 
slight bar to the impetuosity of their attacks."* 

Mr. Wilson's eminence as a photographic 
artist rose by leaps and bounds. A copy of 
his first published stereoscopic view of the 
"Old Mill at Cults" now lies before the 
writer, and at present, so great has been the 
progress of the art, that he wonders that he 
could have been so rash as to order even two 
dozen copies of it. But at the time it was 
considered marvellous, far more satisfactory 
than anything in the way of representation 
than had previously been invented For it 
was not a mere flat picture with the simple 
outlines of the subject, but it had a visible 
rotundity about it, hitherto unrepresented in 
art, the foreground, subject, and background, 
all standing out in their relative positions to 
our marvellously constructed stereoscopic 
eyes, which so few think about. 

The lover of nature must often have been 
deeply impressed with the surpassing beauty, 
the majestic grandeur, or the quiet loveliness 



* How very pat and appropriate an "elegant 
extract " like this is ! The writer delights in, and 
makes no apology for introducing this, because he 
always remembers the case of the Scotch parson, who, 
after delivering a powerful discourse, apologised to 
his session for using so many extracts. " Deed sir ! " 
said an honest elder, "yeneedna apologize for that, 
for we a' thocht the extracts were the very best o't ! " 
And, that sometimes these extracts assume the poetic, 
(or even the advertisement) form, certainly makes the 
text look more picturesque. When Archbishop Whate- 
ley's Elements of Political Economy appeared, it 
being thought desirable by some of his friends that, 
for the benefit of the Irish, an edition should be 
printed in the Celtic tongue, two translators were 
appointed, and did their work. On the first printed 
sheets being shown to the Archbishop, he noticed 
some stanza-looking lines on the intervening pages, 
asked what it was, and got for answer — " Your Grace, 
me and my comrade conceived that it was moighty 
dry reading, so we have just now and then interposed 
a bit of a pawem to help it forward ! " 

There might be worse things than a bit of a 
"pawem," and quite possibly they may be more 
appreciated than the text, and for these bits the 
writer is responsible, but that Editor, and these com- 
positors and printers, are entirely responsible for the 
picturesque form of the advertisement publication — 
which, like the sheep's head set down for dinner, has 
a great deal of confused eating in it. 



of many scenes in this God-made world, and 
would naturally be desirous of retaining his 
happy recollections of them when they were 
unexpectedly presented to him. Not then 
knowing of any existing view of the scene; not 
being an artist, or capable of drawing 
it, or, if one, not having the requisite time, 
his only plan would be that adopted by the 
writer for full fifty years now, and with decided 
success. It is a plan as simple as that of the 
child who is set down to commit to memory 
the 23rd Psalm. Taking as leisurely a view 
of it as he possibly can in the time, he shuts 
his eyes and recalls it, repeating this process 
until it is photographed on the retina of the 
eye — on a space of less than an eighth of an 
inch — from whence, relegated to, and stored 
up in the brain magazines, it may at any 
moment be reproduced in all its pristine 
vividness and reality. 

The writer walked through Glen Tilt in 
1838, and sunny spots in it, with the very posi- 
tion of the clumps of ferns near the tiny water- 
falls, then thought so beautiful, by the adop- 
tion of this plan which is capable of in- 
definite extension, come back to view, and 
recall all the fresh feelings of that far back 
time to the present day. 

But if the view of the " Old Mill " now 
seems somewhat prosaic, our Braemar trip 
was fruitful in new suggestions, struck out 
between us ; for while his artistic eye invari- 
ably selected the best point of view, he 
was always ready to experiment on a hint. 
On one of the last days of this trip, and when 
pushing our way through the brushwood 
below the Falls of Garr-valt, he had selected 
his point of view, which was the best attain- 
able, and had there planted his camera ; when 
the writer suggested that by withdrawing the 
point of view some four feet back, he would 
surround the view with a leafy screen, which 
would at least fill up the vacant space in the 
foreground. He at once adopted the suggest- 
ion as an experiment, and with the happiest 
result, for although the foreground was out of 
focus, and the near branches of the trees with 
their leaves, looked simply black blotches on 
the picture, yet, when placed in the Stereo- 
scope, the view became intensely realistic, 
and the idea of the relative distance of the 



78 



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79 



objects depicted came most vividly out. He 
adopted this plan wherever it could be adopted 
afterwards, and hundreds of his finest views 
are distinguished by their splatchy, blotted 
appearance to the eye, and the magnificence 
of their effect in the stereoscope. 

One extremely valuable lesson, known as 
he finds to very few individuals, the writer 
learnt from him, and which he desires to 
communicate, as a source of enjoyment to 
old friends and new customers of the " Book- 
Stall," as the know- 



place his eyes in a perpendicular, instead of 
the usual horizontal stereoscopic position, 
and then to say if it was over-coloured ? 

What a new revelation it was then ! Be- 
tween the point of view and the horizon line 
of the Grampians there extended a plain of 
from ten to fifteen miles, a wild, waste, 
heathery muir, with nothing attractive in 
colour to ordinary vision. But by the eyes 
being placed perpendicularly instead of hori- 
zontally, the whole scene became a panoramic 

picture, seemingly 



©ur Btwertisers. 



ledge of it has been 
a great enjoyment 
to the writer for 
many after years. 
On dark and 
gloomy days when 
photographing was 
out of the question, 
Mr. Wilson spent 
the time in sketch- 
ing in water- 
colours the scenes 
he fain would have 
photographed ; 
generally and 
generously pre- 
senting these to 
the writer, by 
whom they were, 
and now, oh ! how 
much more so, 
highly valued. 
Free and candid 
outspokenness, 
and without any 
reserve, being the 
rule with us two, 

the writer objected to some of them as being 
slightly over-coloured, and said this was a 
common fault of artists who exaggerated the 
tints of nature, simply to produce a striking 
and startling effect when exhibited in a 
gallery or exhibition, and to kill the pictures 
around them. This objection being urged to 
one sketch of his, carefully preserved by the 
writer, that of Castle Ruthven, (Ruin) near 
Kingussie, the artist took the writer to the 
spot from which the sketch was taken, and 
desiring him to bend on one side, and thus 



No. 



MR. A. S. COOK, 

MAKER OF THE BON-ACCORD SHIRT 



placed at a few 
hundred feet dis- 
tance from the 
observer. Miles of 
blooming heather, 
with its rosy hue, 
were crowded into 
so many feet, and 
the intensity of 
colour so con- 
densed that so far 
from exceeding, 
the sketch seemed 
then to come short 
of that of Nature 
as to colour. 

There are fads 
in art, as there are 
fashions in dress. 
Pre- Raphaelitism 
went to the one 
extreme, and those 
muzzy, obscure, 
indistinct pictures, 
which seemed 
painted for people 
whose eyesight was 
irretrievably damaged, went to the other 
extreme, with the swing of the pendulum. 
A sketch by Wilson, however hastily done, 
or a finished picture by John Mitchell, have, 
to the truthfulness of a photograph the added 
charm of colour, and will always remain 
" a thing of beauty and a joy for ever." 

In after years, when by the beauty of his 
stereoscopic views he had acquired celebrity ; 
when his fame had spread over the whole 
civilised world ; when, aided by the modern 




8o 



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OF 

IVeekly News, 

OVER 

246,000 Copies 

JVEEKL Y. 



This is the Largest Certified Circulation in 
Scotland, or in England out of London, 
and shows that the Weekly News has 
Over One Million Readers. 

SOLD BY OVER TEN THOUSAND 
NEWS-AGENTS. 



W. & D. C. THOMSON, 

Publishers and Proprietors. 



Aberdeen Office: 18 Adelphi. 



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JH J Cleaned, Re-dyed, and made equal 

I :L- to new. It is important that these 

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Manufacturer, in order that they may receive immediate 

and proper attention. 



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beg to intimate that in taking over the Business 
of James Gordon & Son fully two years ago, 
I then added Coloured Dress Goods, which 

has proved a great success ; and with a view to 
increase the development, I have just visited London 
and other Leading Centres, and having made 
careful selections, I am now prepared to show a 
Range of 

Lovely Coloured Dress Materials, including New 
Corduroys, Shot Serges, Whipcords, Shot Diagon- 
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Pattern Millinery Bonnets and Hats. 

The Latest and Confirmed Styles in Mantles, Jackets, 
Capes, Blouses, and Jerseys. 

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Laces, Veils, Veilings, &c, &c. 

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and Squirrel Boas, to be cleared now at Summer 
Prices. 

A Splendid Selection of Umbrellas and Sunshades. 

MANTLE and DRESS MAKING receive most careful 
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Newest Styles, but also Perfect Fit at most Moderate Prices. 

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press, he had done more for opening up Scot- 
land generally, than Sir Walter Scott had 
done for the Trosachs ; when by the ex- 
traordinary demand for his pictures he had to 
revolutionize his business, and to turn his 
modest studio, and his humble workshop into 
a huge manufactory; utilizing all the re- 
sources of science in its engineering machin- 
ery, and of art in colouring and mounting 
the views ; and employing many hands in 
order to meet the ever-increasing demand ; 
then our working 
trips and hard labour 
ceased. He had 
trained a staff of 
assistants to replace 
the negatives which 
were worn out, and 
to submit new ones 
for his approval. 
And then we became 
as it were travelling 
inspectors of new 
scenery, visited Lon- 
don, Windsor, Shake- 
spere's country, Mel- 
rose and the border, 
penetrated the wilds 
of Sutherlandshire, 
and explored Orkney 
and Shetland. He 
was anxious many 
years ago, that we two 
should visit Norway, 
but we could never 
spare the time necess- 
ary, else Norwegian 
trips might have be- 
come fashionable five- 
and-twenty years ago. 

Mr. Wilson's first service for Royalty was 
in his being employed by Prince Albert to 
photograph from time to time the progress of 
the building of the palace arising at Balmoral. 
This being entirely satisfactory to the Prince, 
on its completion he was very frequently 
summoned there to take portraits for Her 
Majesty of any distinguished individuals then 
resident. And Her Majesty with that womanly 
tact, which distinguishes her as a Sovereign, 



©ur Hfcvertisers. No. 2. 







^%:HV 



Mr. James Stephen 

(OF J. STEPHEN <S, SONS, CARVERS AND GILDERS). 



recognising his modest humility and his shy 
and sensitive nature, was peculiarly gracious, 
and made him feel quite at home. On one 
visit he had photographed the Royal Family ; 
some of the portraits with but indifferent 
success. After being nighted in the castle, 
he was out early next morning, away up on 
the hill-side, fixing his camera for a view of 
Lochnagar. Her Majesty and the Prince in 
these happy days of theirs, were out for an 
early walk, and seeing him, strolled through 
the heather to see his 
point of view. Com- 
ing up to him the 
Prince said " Now 
Mr. Wilson, you 
certainly will not 
have to complain of 
your sitter not being 
steady to-day, as you 
did to me yesterday, 
for Lochnagar sits 
very steady indeed." 
But if the Royal 
Family were quick to 
recognize the genuine 
character of Mr. Wil- 
son and his artistic 
ability, to appreciate 
it, and mark it with 
their favour and 
patronage, so were all 
their dependants 
from John Brown 
downwards. Cannie 
Scotchman— pure and 
unadulterated — as he 
was, he kept his 
weather eye open, 
and seeing how the 
all things easy for his 
Wilson. Alone of all 
the household, John could over-ride all state 
regulations, and despise all court etiquette. 
On one occasion Mr. Wilson called on him, 
and was asked if he would like to see Her 
Majesty. ''No, no," said Mr. Wilson "I 
have just been smoking, and I must be smell- 
ing like a brock." " Hach man ! " said John 
" I often have to see Her Majesty that way, 
and she does not care a'e bit, she's weel 



.¥ 



wind blew, he made 
generous friend Mr. 



82 Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



83 



accustomed to that." And so the interview 
took place ; and Mr. Wilson retired, not only 
with his head still intact upon his shoulders, 
but with the expression of Her Majesty's 
high enconiums on his work bestowed upon 
him ; with orders to forward everything he 
did which he thought would interest her, 
especially any views he might take of Glen 
Feshie which she had recently visited. It 
was in order to supply Her Majesty with 
these, that in 1861, Mr. Wilson along with the 
writer took a Speyside tour, the records of 
which, as preserved, are full of all the 
elements which give interest to a voyage 
of discovery, in practically then unknown 
regions. 

Like a loyal subject, heartily seconded by 
his companion, he was most anxious to 
gratify Her Majesty, but Queen's weather 
was denied us, instead of it, we had the 
absence of Sol, the presence of cloud and 
fog, the rain it rained every day, the Spey 
was in roaring flood, and every cart-track the 
bed of a torrent. Naval commanders with 
all the resources of the empire at their 
command, having failed to reach the North 
Pole, what could two humble, but devoted 
servitors do, but accept the inevitable ; and 
discretion being the better part of valour, 
endeavour to preserve their lives for the 
future service of Her Majesty ? 

By Mr. Wilson's death Her Majesty has 
lost a devoted, and quietly but specially 
honoured servant; Scotland, a celebrated 
artist ; Aberdeen, a loyal citizen ; his family, 
a fond relation ; his numerous friends and 
admirers, one who will be much missed by 
them in all the days to come ; and the small 
chain growing smaller every month, which 
binds the writer to this present world, has 
had one of its few remaining links suddenly 
snapt. 



B 1Rare psalter. 



Those who have taken an interest in the subject of 
Psalters know that the groundwork of the Metrical 
Version of the Psalms, which has been used in Scotland 
since May, 1650, was written by Francis Rous, Provost 
of Eton. 

In 1643, ne submitted a copy of his Version — bear- 
ing his name on the title-page — to the Revision Com- 
mittee of the House of Commons, who requested him 
to revise it. This he did, and his Version was reissued 
in 1646, and again submitted to the Revisers, and after 
a further revision, it was recommended by the General 
Assembly of the Church of Scotland and the Estates 
Committee, and adopted, and used on 1st May, 1650. 

The existence of one of the few original copies of 
1643 is so scarce, that Dr. Cotton in his work on the 
subject says — "I never saw a copy in any library — 
public or private — except that of Dr. Bliss of Oxford," 
and which was sold at the sale of his library for 

£10 15/. 

In February last, a copy was discovered in a second- 
hand book-shop in London by Mr. W. T. Brook, the 
well-known hymnologist. This copy was bound up 
with "The Book of Common Prayer," "The Holy 
Bible," "Downam's Concordance," " Sternhold and 
Hopkin's Psalms," all respectively dated 1642, and at 
the end this rare Psalter of Rous dated 1643. When 
found, the volume was about the size of Oliver & Boyd's 
Almanack with the Aberdeen Supplement, and on a 
fly-leaf " Paid Pickering for Binding, 1/6. 1713." 

On the discovery being made, Mr. Brook requested 
the bookseller to send it on approval to Mr. W. L. 
Taylor, Peterhead (Mr. Brook and Mr. Taylor are 
correspondents), who at once purchased it. He has 
removed the Psalter and bound it separately, and 
added the rare volume to his unrivalled collection of 
Psalters. 



XTbe StuMo. 

Now-a-days when Art (with a capital A) receives so 
much attention from the British Public, and the market 
is in consequence flooded with Academy Extras, and the 
Art amateur, the Art critic, the Art buyer all have their 
wants attended to by magazines devoted to various 
forms of Art — one would think that another Art 
magazine was superfluous ; but The Studio aims to 
satisfy still another, viz., the artist. While it is 
sufficiently technical to be of service to him, it is at 



the same time of a style to attract any one with a love 
for Art. In the first numbers an article by Joseph 
Pennell on "Aubrey Beardsley — a new illustrator," 
and another on " Designing for Book-plates," appeal 
specially to us as booksellers interested in Art as 
applied to books. We are glad to see that the publish- 
ers have taken advantage of that most truthful method 
of reproduction — lithography, in the picture which 
they give with this number — -"Weed Burners in the 
Fens," by R. W. Macbeth, A.R.A. 



8 4 



Brown's Book-Stall 



Teachers Bibles 

OXFORD 6- LONDON EDITIONS, 

In a Variety of Different Sizes and Bindings, 

From ?/6 upwards. 




The Smallest Bible in the World, from 3/6, 
The Finger New Testament, from 2/, 
The Finger Prayer-Books, from 2/, 

Are Marvels of Production, doth as to Printing and Binding. 

POCKET BIBLES, from i - to 31/6. 
PEW BIBLES, Very Large Print, 3/6, 6/, and 10/. 




Prayer Books, m '"^Z M „ 



In One Volume, or Two Volumes in Case. 



Prayer Books, 

With Scotch Communion Office, 

1/ 1/3, 1/6, 2/6, & 3/6. 
A. BROWN & CO., 

77 Union Street, Aberdeen, 




Brown's Book-Stall. 



85 



THE BIBLIOMANIAC'S PRAYER. 



Keep me, I pray, in wisdom's way, 

That I may truths eternal seek ; 
I need protecting care to-day, 

My purse is light, my flesh is weak. 
So banish from my erring heart 

All baleful appetites and hints 
Of Satan's fascinating art — 

Of first editions and of prints. 
Direct me in some godly walk 

Which leads away from bookish strife, 
That I with pious deed and talk 

May extra-illustrate my life. 

But if, O Lord, it pleaseth Thee 

To keep me in temptation's way, 
I humbly ask that I may be 

Most notably beset to-day. 
Let my temptation be a book 

Which I shall purchase, hold, and keep, 
Whereon when other men shall look, 

They'll wail to know I got it cheap. 
Oh, let it such a volume be 

As in rare copperplates abounds ! 
Large paper, clean, and fair to see, 

Uncut, unique — unknown to Lowndes. 

— Eugene Field. 



Some Hcafcemp "Bytras." 



Pictures and Sculptures from the Royal Academy 
and the New Gallery: A Special Number of The 
Graphic. 



At this season of the year one feels inclined to 
oracularly declare that of the making of pictures there 
is no end. This sage, if somewhat hackneyed, obser- 
vation is equally true of the books about them. First 
in the field of the now numerous publications relating 
to the Academy, this special issue of The Graphic will 
bear comparison with the best of its later rivals. The 
pictures, though fewer in number than in some of the 
latter, are magnificently reproduced, and to Aberdon- 
ians who cannot see the Academy for themselves, will 
convey an excellent idea of the great picture show of 
the year. 



Academy Notes. Henry Blackburn. 



This is not one of the ordinary "Extras," but an 
independent publication which has been in existence 
for nineteen years, and is thus, by a long way, the 
oldest established of Academy issues. It is essentially 



Tory in every respect, save that in improvement in the 
production of the pictures, for it has neither altered in 
character nor decreased in circulation during its pretty 
considerable lease of life. For the last seven years or 
so, it has been issued in a classified and arranged form 
on the opening morning of the Academy Exhibition, 
a proceeding which of course entails considerable 
expense. Finally it rejoices in 26,000 annual 
subscribers, in addition to miscellaneous sales, 
which ought to run into a considerable figure at 
Brown &° Co.'s, where copies can be had for 1/, less 
the usual discount. 



Pictures and Painters of i8gj 
Guide to the Royal Academy. 



An Illustrated 



Messrs. Newnes, Ltd. have as usual risen to the 
occasion and produced a publication which is no less 
striking for its excellence than for its originality. The 
pick of the paintings in each of the Summer Shows— 
the Academy, the Royal Society of Painters in Water 
Colours, the Royal Society of British Artists, the 
Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours, the New 
Gallery and the New Art Club — have been reproduced 
along with portraits and fac-simile autographs of all 
the more prominent painters of the day. The origin- 
ality of the work consists in having the pictures printed 
in colour on tinted paper, a "fine blend" — like that 
of the combined teas of India, China, and Ceylon — 
being thus obtained. Altogether Pictures of 1893 
"Collars the confectionery" in the way of Academy 
" Extras." Come round and see a copy. The Editor 
will be charmed to meet you. 

BALBUS. 



NOTE. — We have received copies of Hearts 0/ Gold and 
Hearts of Steel, a novel by Henry Herman ; Souvenir oj 
" Becket" ; and That Mrs. Smith! a novel by John Strange 
Winter, which will be noticed in our " Books Worth Buying " 
column next month. Copies of publications for review in 
this column, as well as periodicals to be noticed in our 
"Month's Magazine" page, should be sent to J. G. R., 
Windermere House, 201 Albion Road, Stoke Newing- 
ton, London, N. 



Bibles, 



GOOD VARIETY at 

Brown's, • • 

77 UNION STREET 



86 Brown's Book-Stall. 



Now is the time, * * 



when the "spring cleaning" discovers all the back 
numbers and parts of magazines, 




To post a card 



to Mr. Jackson, 18 Back Wynd, Aberdeen, or telephone 
No. 291, and he will send for them to be bound. 

BEfl. H.EID & CO., Bon-Aeeord Works, Aberdeen, 

Have just received their Season's Stock of Lawn Mowers — over 100 Machines 
to choose from. A call solicited. 



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Show Rooms— Guild Street and Exchange Street. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



87 



Gbis /Ifcontb's Marines, 



May, 1893. 



Longman's Magazine. I have laughed muchly 
"At the Sign of the Ship" in this month's Longman's. 
The genial writer of these delightful notes has had 
bequeathed to him by a man of letters, among other 
MSS., the text of a little treatise called The Practical 
Joker — a Manual for Families, Schools, and General 
Society. Mr. Lang gives a number of samples from 
this work — here are a few of them. As a specimen of 
the simplest and least expensive form of Practical Joke 
is given that of drawing away a chair as a person is to 
sit down upon it — the heavier and the older the patient, 
the more acute the enjoyment of the spectators, while 
the more respected the latter the greater is the 
unexpectedness of the crisis. Then as a receipt to 
cause Disappointment, the following may be useful : — 
This may be simply and almost infallibly produced by 
the assertion that "There is a present for you in the 
dining-room." (1) There may be no present. (2) It 
may be of an unexpensive and undesirable character, 
say half a brick neatly wrapped up in brown paper. 
Of the jokes with beds, such as the introduction of 
what the writer designates "foreign bodies," the Easy 
Joke for Families, the Jokes for Ladies, the Higher 
Jokes on Tradesmen, and many others space will not 
allow me to speak, but, well — get a Longman's and 
read of them for yourselves. 

Atalanta is certainly the Magazine for Young Ladies 
(capitals, O printer, please). All the learned ones 
who go to Belmont Street read it ; the budding 
LL.A.'s of the F. and E. C. Colleges find relaxation 
in its pages, and even the fair maids of Marischal, 
when not listening to lectures on nursing, or botanising 
in search of the rare Husband flower, love to dip into 
its contents to learn " Can this be Love? " (by Mrs. 
Parr). To an ordinary male person the chief interest 
centres in Mr. R. L. Stevenson's exciting serial 
"David Balfour." This I have read religiously, and 
in it, if not in the other contents such as "Gardening 
for Girls " (which is seasonable), or "The Fan" (which 
isn't), I can guarantee from personal experience that 
the intending subscriber will find right good value for 
his money. 



The Ldler. If Jerome is as far-seeing an individual 
as he is a clever writer, he won't obliterate himself 
so completely from future numbers of his delightful 



monthly as he does in the May issue. The Ldler 
without a contribution from its Editor is like beef 
without mustard, or, as a lady barber once prettily put 
it to a dear friend of mine who rejoices in a formidable 
covering to his upper lip: "like a kiss without a 
moustache ! " In this number also, Mr. Archibald 
Forbes, who seems in his day to have gone through 
as many domestics as the most fastidious of Aberdeen 
mistresses could possibly hope to rival, continues the 
chronicling of their lives, dealing on this occasion 
with Servant John, who, alas ! doesn't seem to have 
been much better than Brother Andreas. A hint for 
the suffering and much tried " slaveys " of Bon- 
Accord — turn the tables on your mistresses, and 
double your incomes, by giving your experiences in 
The Ldler. I'm sure that Jerome is open to treat with 
you on the subject ! 



Messrs. Cassell 6° Co.'s Publications. Continuing 
the chronicle of those which last month the exigencies 
of space and the inexorable will of the Editor cut 
short, I find the ladies are the next whose wants are 
ministered to. Married and single — whether/^ tem. 
or otherwise — fair and faded, will alike find something 
to interest them in CasseWs Family Magazine. If 
you are immersed (mentally, of course) in "Blouses," 
it may interest you to know those now worn frequently 
display yoke pieces of distinct tones, or if it be the 
more prosaic subject of "Noses" that bothers you, 
Mr. Barnard's article will afford you the fullest 
information about the various varieties. Then in 
CasseWs Saturday Journal the general reader will find 
much that is instructive and amusing. In the May 
part there are something like ten complete stories and 
any number of interesting articles treating of such 
widely different subjects as the way novelists begin 
their stories, the duties of an Asylum Attendant, and 
what a Female Searcher has to say. Nor have the 
" truly good " been forgotten, for those who are ardent 
Free Kirkers will find solace for the soul in The Quiver, 
where they may follow "The Footsteps of St. Paul" 
as traced by the Rev. Mr. Hardy, or bask in "Light 
Sown for the Righteous " by the Very Rev. the Dean 
of Canterbury. 

ST. JACK. 

Other magazines received — The Theatre , Winter's 
Magazine, The New Peviezv, The Strand, and The 
Pall Mall Magazine (which will be noticed next 
mouth). 



88 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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at prices to 
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Qarderx Seats ar\d Ghairs from 
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Full of local interest. — Aberdeen Journal. 

Zvo Crown, 205 //., SIXPENCE. 

"Jn /Ifoemoriam," 

For 1892, 

Containing 

Portraits and Biographical Notes of 
Prominent Citizens. 



OF ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



Worth having and worth keeping. — Evening Gazette. 

Of permanent value as a record. — People's Journal. 

As a work of reference it cannot be' too highly valued. — 
Northern Figaro. 

Will doubtless be extensively circulated at home and 
abroad. — Northern Advertiser. 

A valuable contribution to local history, and deserves to be 
largely bought and lovingly preserved. — Brozvn's Book-Stall. 



Vols, for 1890 and 1891, NINEPENCE each. 



Household Iiinens. 



P. BEVERIDGE 



Invites inspection of his Stock of 

Table Linen, Cotton and Iiinen Sheetings, Towels and Towellings, 

Blankets, flannels, Eider-Docun Quilts, 

also Ladies' and Children's Underclothing*. 



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Browns' Book-Stall. 



89 




&U 



P~Mii*PlI 



The Braif, Blithe Toon 
o' Aberdeen. 



— cCSK* — 

O ! blithe an' bonnie is oor toon, 

It lies fu' leesome by the sea, 
Wi' waving links an' rounded hills, 

An' sil'ery sands frae Don to Dee. 
Wi' cosy hooses far an' wide, 

Wi' stately streets fu' trig and clean, 
Gang far or near, nae toon's like oor's — 

The braif, blithe toon o' Aberdeen. 

O ! blithe an' bonnie is oor toon, 

For a' the "trubles" it's come through 
In aulden times, when sair-focht fechts 

Were focht for King and countrie too. 
Oor fathers then socht for their bairns 

As much o' lear as cud be gi'en ; 
Sae Colleges they biggit twa — 

Thae braif, bauld men o' Aberdeen. 

O ! blithe an' bonnie is oor toon, 

Far famed for learnin' and for skill ; 
It's sons thrive weel where'er they gang, 

Because they've baith the can and will. 
Bricht on the rolls of fame you find 

The highest honours ha'e been ta'en 
By young folks trained and nurtured in 

The braif, blithe toon o' Aberdeen. 

O ! bauld and skeely are oor men, 

Their famous clippers woo the breeze, 
An' wha can wi' their sailors vie 

In battling wi' the stormy seas. 
Then here's oor ain braif Bon-Accord, 

Nae toon can equal't 'neath the meen 
For weel-faured lads and lasses tee — 

The braif, blithe toon o' Aberdeen. 

O ! blithe and bonnie is oor toon, 

And fair's the strath in which it lies, 
Wi' broomy knowes and wimplin' burns, 

And mountains heath-clad to the skies. 
Nae wunner tho' in a' the Ian' 

Nane equals it — sae think's oor Queen, 
Then three times three for Bon-Accord — 

The braif, blithe toon o' Aberdeen. 



The State of Agriculture in 
Aberdeenshire in 1778. 



From "Present State of Husbandry in Scotland^' 
Edinburgh, 1784. 



G. G. 



Continued from April Number. 

I stopt at the village of Ellon, agreeably situated on 
the north side of the river Ythan. I cannot admire 
the husbandry, though the soil is excellent, capable by 
good cultivation, of making great returns, particularly 
of turnip, cabbage, red clover, etc. It is within the 
reach of lime, which by water carriage may be brought 
within four miles. Yet all these advantages are 
neglected, the tenants are poor, and the crops still 
poorer. The Earl of Aberdeen possesses great tracts 
of land in this part of Aberdeenshire, which, lying in 
a state of nature, must be low rented. It is a great 
misfortune to be too rich ; for it makes many men 
negligent as to the improvement of their estates. 
That nobleman, by laying out what he can well spare, 
has it in his power to double the rent of his great 
estate. He has a thing much more valuable in his 
power, which is, by good cultivation, to draw people 
from a distance, and to give comfortable bread to 
thousands who are but indifferently provided. Here 
true patriotism may be displayed, that carries no false 
colours. 

Mr. Buchan of Auchmacoy is a pleasant old gentle- 
man, who has given great attention to farming. His 
farm consists of 400 acres, rather too much for a 
gentleman of his years. Accordingly he declares him- 
self willing to lease the bulk of it ; and in order to 
entice skilful tenants to every part of his estate, he 
purposes to give leases of 19 years endurance, with 
the life of any person the tenant shall name when he 
has been five years in possession. The ground of this 
farm is very different from what I have hitherto seen 
in Aberdeenshire, not a stone on the surface, and 
scarce any under it. This led Mr. Buchan, when he 
first thought of inclosing, to make earth dikes for 
want of stone. But experience taught him, that 
there is no fence more caduciary. There is scarce any 
earth that can stand firm against washing rains in 
winter and drought in summer ; and if such earth 
could be found, a more formidable enemy remains, 
which are horned cattle, who love to thrust their horns 
into a earth dike, and to toss it about them. The 



9 o 



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and County executed promptly and in the 

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CARPETS Beaten and Cleansed Thoroughly. 

Address— THE MANAGERESS, 

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WILLIAM BLAKE, 

Ifuneral Tflnbertafter, 

Begs to intimate that he has now Removed from 
Black's Buildings, to the more Central Shop, 

43 WOOLMANH1LL 

(Opposite Royal Infirmary), 
where he will give his best attention to all branches 
of the Business as formerly. 

ALEXANDER GILL, 

SeUatchmakcr, Jctocilev, nnh Optician, 
( S u2 d n S s h t?eef ) Now 12 BRIDGE STREET, 

Gives special attention to the Repairing of all kinds of English 
and Foreign Watches — Chronometer, Repeater, Chronograph, 
&c. Also every description of Clock- Work. 

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Comb, Brush, & Sponge Warehouse 



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LADIES' HEAD DRESSER & ORNAMENTAL HAIR MANUFACTURER, 
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Families and Schools attended. Lessons in Hair Dressing 
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Brown's Book-Stall. 



91 



b3tter fed, the more prone they are to that diversion. 
This brought him at last to hedge and ditch, and his 
fences of that sort are good. The soil in general is a 
deep loam upon a clay bottom, but variable in its 
quality, some muirish, some light with a mixture of 
gravel, and some real good loam ; but all foul and full 
of weeds, which got a kindly reception from the 
tenants who possessed the land before him. As the 
quicks planted by Mr. Buchan grow well, I ventured 
to advise to make a border of fresh earth at the root 
of the old earth dikes, and to plant quicks there, to 
be defended from the cattle by a ditch ; and when the 
quicks were advanced, to throw down the old dikes, 
which will be a good manure, after being so long ex- 
posed to sun and frost, especially if mixed with a 
proportion of lime, and ready to be carried off at any 
time to the next field. There was great necessity of 
beginning the improvements with a summer fallow, in 
order to clean the ground of weeds. Forty bolls of 
shell lime are appropriated to an acre, which are 
brought by sea from Lord Elgin's lime works, or from 
Sunderland in the county of Durham, and brought up 
the river Ythan with the tide ; the former, beside the 
carriage, costs 2s 6d. The first and second crop oats, 
third pease, fourth bear with grass-seeds, six pounds red 
clover, six pounds white, and four bushels of hay seed. 
As the grass crop did not answer, he substituted 16 lib. 
red clover and one bushel of ryegrass, where hay only 
was intended, or green food for the cattle. But, if 
pasture was intended, the quantities were 10 pounds red 
clover, six pounds white, and two bushels ryegrass ; 
an alteration much to the better, which, however, may 
be improved when pasture is intended, by adding a 
few pounds of ribwort and yellow clover. 

The crops on the infield I expected to find, as they 
truly were, exceedingly good. But I was surprised to 
find such crops in the out-field which had never seen 
dung, by the force of lime alone. The oats, pease, 
and bear, would all be reckoned good crops in the 
Lothians. Upon one field, in particular, there grew 
the third crop of oats in immediate succession, which 
I should not reckon too high at ten bolls per acre. 
Such is the effect of lime on new ground never limed 
formerly, where the ground takes with it. At the 
same time, I must observe, that this is severe cropping; 
and Mr. Buchan will find himself under the necessity 
of being more gentle to his ground when he finds a 
second liming necessary. Suppose he should take oats 
the first crop, pease the second, bear the third, red 
clover the fourth, for feeding green, which will make 
an addition of dung. Open it after the clover for 



turnip broadcast, which must have dung, at least 15 
cart load to the acre. Let it be spread on the ground 
immediately before the seed farrow, the heat of which 
will make the turnip vegetate quickly, and be a means 
of escaping the black fly. After the clover is exhaust- 
ed, the turning over the ground before winter will be 
a good preparation for the turnip crop, by giving an 
opportunity of choosing a proper time for the second 
ploughing, and even for a third, if necessary. The 
feeding sheep on the ground with turnip, is one of 
the greatest improvements of a soil ; but here the 
hedges are too young to venture it. 

Mr. Buchan has fine farm-offices, perfectly com- 
modious. His implements of husbandry are far 
superior to the common sort, though not equal to 
those used by Commissioner Udny. Mr. Buchan's 
example begins to operate upon his tenants. Most of 
them have turnip and patches of red clover. These 
beginnings are feeble, but they will be found to be 
beneficial, and then they will go on with rapidity. 

There are in this district commodious markets for 
corn, and a seaport within two or three miles for 
carrying it to be sold in the Firth of Forth, and lime 
brought in return. Stall fed cattle are not common 
here, as people used to a lower price can scarce think 
of paying for fat meat. But difficulties attend every 
new article of commerce. The difficulty was the 
same in Berwickshire and the Lothians. But now 
people have come to understand their interests better. 
So will the people of Aberdeenshire ; and then feed- 
ing of cattle will be a profitable article for the market 
of Aberdeen, as well as for inferior markets. 

In this tract, day-labourers are hired for 6d. a day 
in summer, and 5d. in winter. A ploughman hired 
by the year gets £4 Sterling for wages, and, if not 
maintained in his master's house, he gets two pecks of 
oat meal weekly. Thus, upon a fair computation, 
the labourer draws less yearly than the hired servant, 
which is not a little singular. I was surprised at it, 
till, upon examination, I discovered the reason. The 
labourers, all of them, possess a piece of ground at a 
low rent, sufficient to maintain a cow, and the small 
hire is compensated by the profit of the farm. This 
method, at the same time, tends to population, by 
rearing many children ; and it is of great advantage 
to enterprising farmers to command hands for carrying 
on with expedition any of their plans. Let me only 
add, that this is the only way to keep down the hire 
of labourers, it being always in the landlord's power 
to raise the rent upon the labourer, in proportion to 
the advance of hire. 



Brown's Book- St all. 



92 



Campbell & Company, 

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MANUFACTURERS, 

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Published at 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. 18. 



JUNE. 



1893. 



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No. 1 8. 



JUNE. 



1893. 



Brown's Bberfceen J5ooft*5tall. 



No. XVIII. 



"Ten ordinary histories of kings and courtiers 
were well exchanged against the tenth part of one 
good history of booksellers."— Carlyle. 

" For the other employments of life do not suit all 
times, ages, or places : whereas literary studies employ 
the thoughts of the young, are the delight of the old, 
the ornament of prosperity, the refuge and solace of 
adversity, our amusement at home, no impediment to 
us abroad, employ our thoughts in the night, attend 
us when we travel, and accompany us when we retire 
into the country." — Cicero. 



!2>.** 



HE three partners of the 
Book Stall, the trinary 
stars which to their 
^satellite assistants, fill- 
ed their horizons with 
the everchanging 
atmospheres around 
them, were a never- 
failing source of in- 
terest and attraction 
to their young and 
eagerly enquiring minds. In many an em- 
ployment, the endless monotony tends to 
breed stagnation of thought, and to turn 
men into mere machines. Even in a book- 
sellers business, if it is a class one, either 
scholastic, medical, or religious, the culture 
and intelligence of those engaged in it is apt 
to become cramped, dwarfed, and stunted, as 




compared with those who enjoy a wider air, 
a freer atmosphere, and a more varied mixture 
of those elements which constitute general 
society with its many sided character. 

The atmosphere of the Stall reminded one 
of our Spring weather, it changed continually, 
had an endless variety, and was both bracing 
and stimulative. If the cronies of the 
Provost brought into the place blinks of light 
from old oil crusies, wafts of air from long 
past seasons, ancient flowers of anecdote 
still retaining a scent, and reminiscences of 
the bye-gone, those who called on his son, 
the youngest partner, kept us all in touch 
with the present. And as in Nature, the 
sudden mixture of two different atmospheres 
— still more three — produces disturbance and 
storm — so in the Book-Stall, the sharp con- 
trasts between old and new, past and present, 
personified in the visitors, prevented any- 
thing like stagnation in our little world. 

Both the Provost and his son had inherited 
a quick, emotional, and impulsive nature. 
By the age of the first, his wide experience 
of the world, and as there is good reason to 
believe, by the ever present, quiet, steady, 
religious influence of his partner in life, he, 
in his olden days had been toned down to 
live in a very equal temperament which was 
not easily roused ; although he was — as much 
so as ever — fond of company, of the feast of 
reason and the flow of soul, and keenly alive 
to wit, repartee, and joke. 

From some far off ancestor — say Jubal — 
Mr. William Brown — like many other persons 
of a sensitive and emotional character — had 
inherited a love of music, and from his 



94 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Full of local interest. — Aberdeen Journal. 



8vo Crown, 205 //., SIXPENCE. 

"3n /Iftemoriam," 

For 1892, 

Containing 

Portraits and Biographical Notes of 
Prominent Citizens. 



OF ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



Worth having and worth keeping. — Evening Gazette. 

Of permanent value as a record. — People's Journal. 

As a work of reference it cannot be too highly valued. — 
Xorthem Figaro. 

Will doubtless be extensively circulated at home and 
abroad. — Northern Advertiser. 

A valuable contribution to local history, and deserves to be 
largely bought and lovingly preserved. — Brown's Book-Stall. 



Vols, for 1890 and 1891, NINEPENCE each. 



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For Particulars see Hand- Books from the Secretary, 
A. M. BYRES, C.A., 18 Union Terrace, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



95 



earliest years, and all through life, he was 
powerfully affected by, and very deeply 
attached to it. And for its cultivation and 
fruitage he was born, not only in a congenial 
soil, but at the proper time. The hour and 
the man came together. 

For Aberdeen long enjoyed celebrity for 
its proficiency in music. Its printer, Forbes, 
is said to have had the first music types in 
Scotland, and in 1662 he printed the first 
collection of secular music which had 
appeared in it, and so popular was it, that it 
went through three editions j while the Aber- 
deen Burgh Sang Schule was the last of 
these pre-reformation institutions, continuing 
until 1758, and we have looked on the house 
in which the Schule was held in the Back 
Wynd. 

But although by the beginning of the 
century this school was defunct, and the 
Musical Society, at one time so influential, 
was then in its decadence, yet it is possible, 
nay probable, that this did not imply any 
decadence in the musical taste of the in- 
habitants, but may have arisen from the more 
general diffusion of this taste, and its more 
extensive cultivation in middle class families, 
who did not find easy access to the society's 
full-dress concerts. And this is confirmed 
by the establishment and long continued 
prosperity of the Musical Library which was 
begun and carried on in the Book-Stall. 

Here both time and space fail us, to speak 
of the revivals of sacred music in 1754 and 
in 1854, both emanating in Aberdeen, and 
from thence flowing over the whole of Scot- 
land in a mighty and powerful stream. The 
account of this would require a volume to it- 
self, but as these rambling sketches may per- 
haps serve as a Memoire pour servir for the 
future historian and help to preserve some in- 
cidents, and show some traits of character now 
happily defunct — we note that in the latter 
year a well known banker, a trustee in St. 
Andrew's chapel, and a lover of music, ask- 
ing the writer what was doing in music, and 
being told that a psalmody class of eight 
hundred members was then meeting in the 
Mechanics' Hall, that the effect was magnifi- 
cent, and that as the fee was only a shilling 



a quarter, he should look in and hear it. 
"Well, well," he said, "that certainly is 

sacred music ■ cheap." Now reader, 

please don't be horrified ; don't even shudder 
at the exceedingly inappropriate terms in 
which his appreciation was expressed. Re- 
member that a generation has passed since 
then, and that at the time there was a remnant 
of a previous generation still alive, to whom 
the plentiful use of oaths and bad language 
was simply the sign of a liberal and genteel 
education. The very ladies admired it as 
manly j as the right and mark of a gentleman, 
and accordingly all tried to be thought such. 
The naval chaplain cursed the sailors because 
it made them listen much more attentively 
to the sermon, and the habit was not con- 
fined to naval chaplains. Bad language was 
the fashionable slang of the period, and was 
used by all classes, even by ladies at times. 
Mrs. Dundas, the mother of Viscount 
Melville, being told that the Prince of 
Wales had been boasting of his intimacy 

with a lady, broke out — " the villain, 

does he kiss and tell ? " 

Language in those days used a freedom of 
expression which is not tolerated at present, 
when, in some circles, and in the presence of 
ladies, it is considered impolite to speak of 
the bare legs of a table. Even the occupant 
of a pulpit called a spade a spade, and not 
an agricultural implement. The following is 
too tempting an example for insertion, to 
omit it. Of the Rev. Hugh Hart's many 
eccentricities, numerous examples are in 
print — here is a new, and by good authority 
a true one. In his latter days the attendance 
in his chapel in John Street became scanty, 
and the seat rents fell away. One Sunday 
forenoon in the course of his sermon he said — 
" My brethren, as I was on my way here this 
morning, I was addressed by a gentleman in 
black, who condoled with me on the empty 
pews and the deserted church, as compared 
with the old days ; and then he said ' Mr. 
Hart ! Mr. Hart ! you are not going the right 
way to work Sir ; this w T ay of yours will never 
do, you are preaching much too sound 
doctrine for your people ; you should preach 
more smoothly and pleasantly to them, 
and instead of the rigours of the law, you 



9 6 



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97 



should say, peace, peace, to them.' ' My 
friends,' says Mr. Hart, ' when I took a good 
look at him, I soon saw that this was the very 
devil himself in disguise, and immediately I 
said to him, 'you go to Hell, Sir,' and so — 
he then went home at once." 

Mr. William Brown, like a great many 
others at the time, grew into a knowledge of 
music as children learn to speak, without 
ever troubling themselves as to the rules of 
the science. Of these he chose to continue 
ignorant to the last, but his ear was so keenly 
sensitive, that a false note in harmony, or 
tones in the minutest shade too sharp or flat 
drove him almost distracted. In the first 
half of this century the service of praise in 
our presbyterian churches was simply ex- 
cruciating to all sensitive ears, and so sensitive 
were his, that even in church, his writhings of 
body, and contortions of face under the 
torture were painfully apparent to all around 
him, and all through the congregation, the 
tyro, or the ignorant in music, could easily 
judge of the character of the music by Mr. 
Brown's behaviour. When in the early 
Indian career of General Sir David Baird, 
he had the misfortune to be captured by 
Hyder Ali, and was kept in a dungeon 
chained to another prisoner ; his mother, no 
doubt deeply affected by the tidings, felt all 
a mother's love for him, but knowing his 
active, indomitable nature, all she said was — 
" Weel, weel ! pity the loon that's chained to 
oor Davie." And so with feelings like that 
of Mrs. Baird, it might be said of Mr. 
William Brown. If by his musical ear he had 
beatific times, and moments of ecstatic 
delight, revelling in a world of sound, of 
which grosser souls like that of Dr. Johnson 
could only say that it was "a pleasing noise," 
then his face and whole demeanour showed 
his unbounded delight. But this being a 
dual world, every ecstasy having in it its 
corresponding depression, the tortures which 
he endured from music — unexpressive of the 
sentiment, or false and untrue in the uttering 
—rendered him quite incapable of controlling 
his emotions, which got vent in contortions 
of face and body, in action, and even in 
speech. "Then," say we, "pity those in- 
dividuals, who, for the two hours' service 



were chained to the pews adjoining that 
occupied by Mr. Brown," for as some of 
them said, their devotional feelings were 
sometimes sadly interrupted. 

He was the barometer in the church as to 
the condition of the musical atmosphere, and 
his actions were watched by those in the 
front breast of the galleries, and all within 
sight of him. If his face was serene they 
joined in the harmony, but if clouded they 
sat silent and with very good reason, for then 
there was something undoubtedly musically 
wrong. 

But for heredity, and his early training, he 
might possibly have joined the Episcopal 
Church, as many others did, for the musical 
service alone. Had that church been at 
peace, and not as it was, distracted by con- 
tentions between the two Scottish sections 
regarding their Communion Service, the 
pretentious claims of Priests, and the new 
Ritualism, undoubtedly it would have received 
far larger additions to its membership than it 
certainly did, from this cause alone. But at 
that time, such was the ferment of mind in 
all the churches that doves who flew out 
from one ark in hope of peace and rest, 
found none, and came back again bearing an 
olive branch, and were glad of the old 
shelter. 

So devoted was Mr. Brown to music that 
he built at Broadford Cottage a large and 
handsome music room, unrivalled then in any 
private residence in the city. There, it was 
his delight to collect all the professionals and 
music lovers in the place — Mr. Baker, 
organist, Arthur Thomson, the banker, and 
his two accomplished daughters — the vocal 
prima donnas of the Musical Society ; Aleck 
Ewing, the master of many instruments, and 
the composer of a hymn tune which will live 
as long as music is known* — Henry Ambrose 

*Mr. A. Ewing was the first in Aberdeen to 
wear a beard. At one of these Broadford meetings 
a lady addressed him — " Now Mr. Ewing, why do you 
go about and make yourself such a guy with that 
beard of yours ? " to which he replied " My dear lady, 
it is not I that make myself a guy, but those creatures 
who object to wear what God gave them for their 
adornment, their comfort and protection." Society 
has upheld his verdict. In France the practice began 
at the Revolution in 1830. 



9» 



Brown's Book-Stai.i.. 



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99 



Smith with all his associates in the Haydn 
Society. With his daughter Catherine (now 
Mrs. Burns), presiding at the grand pianoforte, 
— and as a performer she was then considered 
amongst the first in Scotland ; with her father 
at the double bass, Mr. Baker, first violin, 
Mr. Ewing, second, Mr. Gordon, viola, Mr. 
Smith, flute, and with a ready and willing 
batch of vocalists, chamber music and 
masses by the first masters would be heard in 
perfection. No wonder that some of us 
employees who were privileged to be present, 
should have been then deeply smitten with 
the love of music. The happy memories of 
these meetings dwell in our minds as the first 
entrance into a higher and purer atmosphere ; 
the echoes of these strains ring in our ears 
all through the many summers and winters 
since then — 

"When Music, heavenly maid, was young." 

The gigantic case, as we youngsters 
thought it, for Mr. Brown's double bass violin 
lay on the floor of one of the store rooms in 
No. 71 Union Street. With what awe the 
young apprentices were introduced to it, 
especially when they were told that the fiddle 
was an antediluvian one, and had belonged to 
Goliath of Gath. But as too much familiarity 
breeds contempt, it came to pass that when 
the youngsters were playing high jinks in the 
long suite of rooms, (which afforded Andrew 
Murray — a grandson of the Provost's — a pistol 
range of nearly sixty feet long), and when 
James Matthews, the foreman, came down to 
call a message boy, two of them would jump 
in and conceal themselves in the fiddle case 
until he passed into the next room, when 
they would bolt out of it and run upstairs to 
the shop. It was a delightful little trick, but 
was tried once too often, for next time as he 
passed, James fastened down the sneck of 
the case and kept the two nickums in durance 
vile until they roared for mercy. Boys will 
be boys, even though young booksellers. 

Just as the strings of a well-tuned piano, 
though untouched, will vibrate and sound 
responsive to the notes of a singer beside it, 
so like an ^Eolian harp, did the soul of Mr. 
William Brown respond to all the musical 
impulses of the time and place. The Aber- 



deen Musical Festival of 1834, the blossoming 
of seed sown sixty years previously in the 
establishing of the Musical Society — itself an 
outcome of the old Sang Schule — was an 
epoch in the musical annals of the city. 

It was a fine example of heredity in the 
inhabitants, the final and last attempt to 
revive the old Musical Society on its ancient 
conservative and exclusive basis. It failed in 
this, because by that time the reign of 
Democracy had begun. But it did a world 
of good. For the first time out of Edin- 
burgh, the soul-inspiring strains of Handel's 
" Messiah " were heard in Scotland, and the 
echo of its strains has never ceased rever- 
berating for sixty years. During the three 
days of its continuance Mr. Brown was in a 
fever of excitement, and some of his em- 
ployees — to all of whom tickets of admission 
were given — caught the infection. Some of 
them could say — 

" Then felt I like some watcher of the skies 
When a new planet swims into his ken ; 

Or, like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes 
He stared at the Pacific, — and all his men 

Looked at each other, with a wild surmise, 
Silently, — upon a peak in Darien." 

The seed sown by that Musical Festival 
fell on congenial soil ; it sprung up and 
fructified with ample results in after years. 
The story of the " Harmonic Choir " with its 
powerful influence ; the doings of the " Euter- 
pean " and " Haydn " Societies ; the establish- 
ment of the " Musical Association " with its 
high-class concerts ; and the rise and progress 
of the " Association for the Improvement of 
Psalmody," from which sprung the " Choral 
Union " with nearly forty other societies, 
would form the ground work of articles in 
more numbers of the Book-Stall than the 
writer can ever hope to see, and for which 
there is ample material, somewhat ante- 
diluvial however to a great many readers 
unless addicted to ancient history. 

Meantime, and trying to keep to the thread 
of our story, we mention that in 1856, in 
consequence of the introduction of an organ 
in St. George's Church, Liverpool, then in 
connection with the Free Church, the question 
of instrumental aid in worship was raised. 
Dr. Candlish republished an old treatise 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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IOI 



condemning the introduction, and Mr. 
Cromar vindicated it. The two little books 
were put into the writer's hands, with the 
request of a review for the Aberdeen Herald, 
which was supplied and published. 

Besides trying to expose some absurdities 
in the arguments of anti-organists, who 
persisted in viewing the question as the 
organ versus the human voice, and not as an 
aid ; the prior question, why music per se was 
used, and why the praise was sung and not 
read, was considered. And it was attempted 
to be shown that if the words supplied the 
theme, the music intensified the feeling, and 
supplied the very essence of praise — the 
emotion — without which, according to all 
human experience, the praise was cold and 
lifeless. The article concluded thus — 

"Space will not permit us to continue the subject, 
but we indicate a line of argument far too little 
attended to, and attention to which may be of use in 
the controversy. Unfortunately, the practical settle- 
ment of it in favour of the organ involves sacrifices of 
cherished prejudices which present, even in this liberal 
arid enlightened age, great barriers ; while its settle- 
ment against the organ saves some expense, which 
seems more valuable to many than feeling or emotion. 
We have no hope of seeing the organ general in our 
Presbyterian Churches, and have no wish that any 
church or congregation should "break up," or even 
that the relation of churches and individuals should 
be painfully affected by the question ; but we do 
think that there ought to be sufficient liberality of 
feeling manifested, as to permit those who agree 
amongst themselves, to use the organ if so inclined. 

We are slowly but certainly making advances in 
this matter. One hundred years ago the introduction, 
in this quarter, of the pitch-pipe for the simple 
purpose of taking the key introduced much discord ; 
and, combined with the cessation of reading the line, 
and singing the tunes a little faster than the rate at 
which they were formerly sung, "occasioned such 
disturbances, distractions, alienations, divisions, and 
heartburnings, that the 1745 was but a jest to it " ! ! 
Let it not be said in after years that this question was 
so handled, but that permission having been granted, 
some congregations adopted the organ, while others 
did not ; and that in either case the praises of God — 
formerly so cold and lifeless in their utterance — at 
this time assumed a new importance as an element in 
worship, and men awakened as if from a dream to a 
sense of duty, and to the benefits they received from 
a proper attention to this duty." 

The amusing thing in this deliverance of 
nearly forty years ago is the optimist view of 
1856 as a "liberal and enlightened age," and 
the pessimist view of having "no hope of 



seeing the organ general in our Presbyterian 
churches." Yet the hope of "sufficient 
liberality" has been fulfilled, which makes 
the writer still an optimist, with encourage- 
ment to continue so. 

Mr. William Brown only read this article 
on the Saturday evening after it had appeared, 
and it seems to have touched him to the 
quick. With his usual impulsiveness he 
instantly went off in search of Mr. Carnie, 
the then sub-editor of the Herald^ and in 
spite of all the well known strict rules of the 
press as to reticence in disclosing the names 
of contributors, by his cajoling earnestness — 
we shall not say bribery, because that is a 
thing unknown to sub-editors, who will brave 
an action in a civil court rather than disclose 
this — he wormed out from him the fact that 
the article was written by his own partner. 
If Mr. Brown was pleased with the article 
before, he was doubly pleased now, nay, was 
intensely surprised and delighted, and he 
ordered a number of copies forthwith, which 
he posted to Dr. Candlish, and all his Free 
Church friends. 

Next day — Sabbath — the writer found him 
waiting for him on his exit from church, still 
so excited that his fellow members thought 
something tremendously serious had hap- 
pened. He was pleased to express his 
gratification at the views stated, and begged 
the writer to forward him anything more he 
wrote on the subject. 



A STORY IN THREE ADS. 



(Edition of 1st May, 1891). 

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FOR SALE.— A Tandem Bicycle, in Fairly Good. 
Condition. Terms Cash, or will accept New 
Perambulator in part payment. Address — J. T. 
(Office of this paper). 



102 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



G. Mitchell Moir, 

Music Seller, 



jX Has a most Choice Selection of_ 

f 




American Organs 
and Pianos. 




82 Union Street, Aberdeen. 




The 



History of 

Loch 
Kinnord. 



Rev. J. G. Michie. 



Price 1/6, Post Free 1/9 



A. BROWN & CO., 

77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



I 



ft CLUB VELLUM 

JMOT_EfAPER fi*b 



A BROWN &CO 

STATIONERS. 

77. Union Street. ABERDEEN. 



Make ^oar Will. 

Forms for making a WILL, with 
Directions, 3d. each, post free, 3|d. 



A. Brown & Co., 

77 Union Street. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



103 



Books Mortb JSuging. 



Hearts of Gold and Hearts of Steel. 
Henry Herman. 



I started to cut this volume open the other evening 
and the first words which met my eye were, " If you 
darken this door again, by Heaven, I'll murder you!" 
I am a nervous person and I read no more that night, 
but continued the cutting process. My curiosity how- 
ever, got the better of my timidity, and at an hour 
less near the witching one of midnight, I returned to 
the volume. The early promise which the story gave 
of something exciting was in no way falsified, and to 
those of you who will promise to take it in very 
moderate instalments after supper, and who. can read 
Rider Haggard and Wilkie Collins without a tremor, 
I can promise a genuine treat in the perusal of Mr. 
Henry Herman's latest novel. 



Souvenir of " Becket. " As produced at the Lyceum 
Theatre, 6th February, 1893. 



Part of the history of a successful play is, nowadays, 
the issuing of a souvenir of its production. In days of 
yore — no, dear reader, I'm not going to say anything 
poetical this time — the Lyceum management were, I 
believe, alone in issuing these, but now the practice 
has become almost universal, and souvenirs are to be 
met with at every turn. Those issued by the Black 
and White Publishing Company for Mr. Irving still, 
however, outdistance in artistic excellence all would- 
be rivals, and in the dozen or so illustrations of 
Scenes from " Becket," which have lately been 
published as a memento of that most successful play, 
the fortunate possessor will have a volume which is 
worthy of a place beside the Silver Cake Basket and 
the prize Jane Annie gained at the Bible Class — on 
the Dining-room Table. 



That Mrs. Smith! John Strange Winter 
(Mrs. Stannard). 



Our erratic climate is not without its advantages, 
for the present almost tropical weather which has come 
upon London town has brought thoughts of holidays 
and the sea-shore or the mountain glen to the weary 
toiler. Inevitable consequence, popular authors have 
been up and doing, and little volumes which one can 



enjoy when safe beyond the reach of newspapers, have 
begun to appear. Among them is That Mrs. Smith ! 
the story of a young lady who, thrown upon her own 
resources with the moderate (for a novel heroine) in- 
come of some ^900 per annum, proceeds to travel, 
and, no male person having as yet smiled upon her, 
takes, with a view to spare Mrs. Grundy's feelings, the 
name of Mrs. Smith. Of the difficulties arising from 
this innocent stratagem it would not be fair to the 
writer to tell, but the idea is original and well worked 
out, and those who can appreciate something above 
the average shilling ' ' shocker " will find what they 
desire in Mrs. Stannard's interesting little story. But 
why did the author picture a lawyer as anxious to 
wash his hands of the affairs of a blameless client, 
whose only fault was that she had more money than 
she knew what to do with ? He certainly wasn't an 
Aberdeen one who was guilty of so unprofessional 
conduct ! 

ST. JACK. 



NOTE. — The Editor requests that publications for 
review in this column, as well as periodicals to be 
noticed in our "Month's Magazines' " page, should 
be sent to St. Jack, 27 The Avenue, Bruce 
Grove, Tottenham. Publishers and others send- 
ing periodicals are requested to note the change of 
address. 



Gbts /Ifcontb's Marines. 



June, 1893. 



The Pall Mall Magazine. The gentle reader need 
not revile me and write to the Editor complaining 
that I am not up-to-date on account of this new maga- 
zine not having received due recognition last month, 
because I have several ready-made explanations in 
hand in case of such an emergency. In primo loco, 
as the Bonds and Dispositions in Security used to say, 
it was quite possible that the Pall Mall might — not, 
of course, through any fault of its own — have died in 
early infancy, and the little paragraph of praise which 
I, as a candid critic, was in duty bound to sing over 
its coming, would thereupon have been rather mis- 
applied. Then the Proprietor might have sent me a 
bill for the number, or he might have marked it 
"Specimen," and prevented my placing it on the 
drawing-room table, or bequeathing it to the Free 
Library of the district, in either of which events my 



o4 Brown's Book-Stall. 



IBefore going for Holidays, 1 

Look out the Magazines and Books to 
be bound, and so 

Have your Bookshelves neatly arranged 

For the coming Reading Evenings. 

A post-card or telephone message to 
send for the books will be attended to. 

WILLIAM JACKSON, 
Telephone 2gi. 18 Back JVynd, Aberdeen. 

Household Itinens. 



P. BEVERIDGE 



Invites inspection of his Stock of 

Table Itinen, Cotton and Itinen Sheetings, Tomels and Towellings, 

Blankets, flannels, Eider-Domn Quilts, 

also Ladies' and Children's Underclothing. 



MARRIAGE AND FOREIGN NAPERY AND OUTFITTING ORDERS MARKED 
AND DELIVERED READY FOR USE. 



39 & 41 ST. flIGtfOMS STREET, ABEHDEEjl 

ESTABLISHED 1841. TELEPHONE No. 38 L 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



i°5 



panegyric would have been wasted. I have any num- 
ber of like good reasons ready, so the reader may save 
his postage stamps, and understand that like every 
other misfortune, it was all for the best. The second 
number of the Pall Mall is, I think, a great improve- 
ment on the first (which is saying a good deal), and 
will do much to secure for it a permanent position 
among the most popular of monthlies. 



The Butterfly. This is another new magazine 
which escaped recognition last month. The fore- 
going remarks, however, do not apply to it, as the 
Editor did send a copy in time for notice. The 
Butterfly is something entirely new and original in the 
magazine line. In form it is tall and slim, just like — 
but I won't tell tales on my Editor. The illustrations 
by Mr. Raven Hill are excellent, and very amusing, 
while the reading matter has only one fault — there 
isn't half enough of it . This new periodical is certain 
to be a favourite among all who love Literature in her 
lightest and brightest {vide new cover) guise, and can 
appreciate a magazine which can be carried, if need 
be, in the pocket of their darling's black merino — 
only that it would never be found again, the pocket, 
I mean, not the magazine. 



The New Revietv is nothing if not up to date. 
The Duke of York, Middlemen and Parasites, our 
Academicians and their Associates, and Crime and 
Punishment, are all subjects on which the General 
Public is at present more or less exercising its mind. 
Mr. Grove, with that foresight which is so marked a 
feature of his Editorship, has secured contributions 
on each of these topics by writers whose names are a 
guarantee that their productions will be both instruc- 
tive and entertaining. "Public Slaughter-Houses" 
and " Eree Education in Paris," though not perhaps 
appealing to such a wide section of the great B. P., 
are both eminently readable and appropriate. In 
short, the New, in addition to being the cheapest, has 
the additional recommendation of being one of the 
best of the many monthly reviews. 



The Studio. This is still another new venture on 
the Sea of Journalism, and all may know it by its 
weird and wonderful cover of green, with a design 
which could only have been conceived by the master 
mind of Walter Crane. The contents as the name 
implies, are devoted to Art, and from what I have 
seen of the first three numbers, the magazine seems 



likely to prove a formidable rival to its higher priced 
brethren. Intending purchasers will please note that 
the price is only 6d., which is decidedly cheap for a 
publication dealing with ART. 



The Theatre. Every number of this periodical 
seems better than its predecessor. A series of articles 
on "Stars of the Stage" has just been started, the 
June one dealing with Miss Kate Rorke, who at 
present plays the heroine in Mr. Hare's revival of 
Diplomacy at the Garrick. Mr.W. Davenport Adams 
begins what promises to be a most interesting account 
of Actors of the Age, this month's article being retro- 
spective and telling of the past generation of histrionic 
celebrities. Then there is a very smartly written skit 
on Mr. Oscar Wilde's very latest production, "A 
Woman of no Importance," which those of you who 
saw "Lady Windermere's Ean " with its wealth of 
pretty paradox will enjoy immensely. Next month 
brings the first part of a new volume, and is therefore 
a time pre-eminently suited for giving your order to 
the Editor of the Book-Stall, who has most solemnly 
assured me — and he is a man of his word — that he 
will attend to it personally. 



The Picture Magazine. It is, to me, astonishing 
how everything that Mr. Newnes lays his hand upon 
seems to flourish beyond all expectation. At the start 
the Picture Magazine had plenty of room for improve- 
ment, but now, though only a few months old, 
it has made its mark as a most interesting and 
entertaining periodical, with the novelty of being 
entirely composed of pictures. To my fancy the 
fashion plates of a former generation are very instruc- 
tive, and ought to prove a warning to the fair wearers 
of the bell-skirt and the hats of 1830 of what they 
may possibly become if they continue in the revivication 
of fashions that really ought, at this time, to be dead 
as Queen Anne. 



Great Thoughts is, as its name implies, a magazine 
devoted to the gathering and recording of the great 
thoughts of great thinkers — the Editor of this paper 
and I excepted. The "Thoughts" are wide in range 
and treat of a variety of subjects, with a leaning 
towards matters religious. To a first-class Heathen 
like myself, the most interesting items in the number 
are Raymond Blathwayt's interviews with celebrities 
of the day, though I have no doubt that the latter-day 
Saints (I'm really not one of them, tho' you may find 



io6 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Visiting Gards. 



^ 


50 for 1/6, 100 for 2/6, - 

Addresses 6d. extra. 


- - - 


A. BROWN 


& 

77 


CO., 

Union St 


REET. 



JOHN MGItEOD, 

^Efiiiivbrcsscr ani> JP^rfunur, 
40 BRIDGE STREET, ABERDEEN. 

Ladies and Gentlemen's Wigs, Scalps, Scalpetts, and 
every description of Hair Work to order. 

COMBS. BRUSHES, BRITISH AND FOREIGN PERFUMERY. 

Awt UtKRtST V\RSvC\-kSS WN\RORtSS\NG ^USUSHMtUT 

Six Etchings of 
Local Scenery, 

• • One Shilling • • 

Or in Cloth Gilt, 1/6. 

A. BlfOWfl & CO., 



77 UNION STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



&j)c %kxkm Stciim famtky, 

CLAREMONT STREET. 

(TELEPHONE 190.) 



LAUNDRY WORK of every description from Town 

and County executed promptly and in the 

best manner. 



CARPETS Beaten and Cleansed Thoroughly. 

^^rw-THE MANAGERESS, 

Claremont Street, ABERDEEN. 



WILLIAM BLAKE, 

Ifuneral Ifln&ertafcer, 

Begs to intimate that he has now Removed from 
Black's Buildings, to the more Central Shop, 

43 WOOLMANHILL 

(Opposite Royal Infirmary), 

where he will give his best attention to all branches 
of the Business as formerly. 



GUIDE BOOKS. -98 

Aberdeen, 
Deeside,- 
Bennachie, - 
Ben Muich Dhui, 



1/ 



A. BROWN & CO., 77 UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 
treasonable Prices and Good Work 

AT 

W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers. 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberfceen, 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries.' 



ALEXANDER GILL, 

SStatdtmaker, Jrtodler, mn'b Opttcinn, 
( S UnSo d n & s h treet ff ) Now 12 BRIDGE STREET, 

Gives special attention to the Repairing of all kinds of English 
and Foreign Watches — Chronometer, Repeater, Chronograph, 
&c. Also every description of Clock-Work. 

&W PLEASE BRING YOUR REPAIRS. 
Stopping and Irregular Watches Corrected, and 
Work Guaranteed. 

SPLENDID VALUE IN MARBLE PRESENTATION CLOCKS. 

cheap american clocks. 
Superior Spectacles & Eye Glasses. 

Thou with Weak Sight should try them. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



107 



it hard to believe — they're mostly Baillies) in Aberdeen 
will be interested to learn, on the authority of an 
Arab proverb, that "the camel never sees its own 
hump, but that of its brother is always before its eyes," 
while the maiden all forlorn in the same locality may 
take heart of hope when she learns that there are 
wanted in America, in one hundred thousand house- 
holds, a willing sunshiny daughter who will not fret 
when asked to wipe the dishes or sigh when requested 
to take care of the baby. Verily, there is hope for 
Great Thoughts in Bon-Accord. 

ST. JACK. 

Other magazines received : The Bohemian, Winter's 
Magazine, The Strand, The Idler, Longmarfs, 
Atalanta, The Magazine of Art, CasseIVs Saturday 
Journal, and the Catholic Fireside. 



Bberfconiana. 



THE BUCHAN DIALECT. 

An Aberdonian in London was one afternoon 
walking through Regent Street when he felt the 
desire of a smoke strongly gaining upon him. On 
examining his pipe however he found it choked, so 
that he had no alternative, but to want his smoke, or 
get his pipe cleared. He determined to adopt the 
latter alternative, and after looking right and left, he 
thought of trying his luck in one of those famous 
magnificent shops for which Regent Street is celebrated. 
Entering one devoted to silks and satins, he found it 
filled with fashionable and aristocratic ladies, and 
after waiting a few minutes, one of the assistants came 
up and politely asked "what he could do to serve 
him?" when the following colloquy ensued : "Ay man ! 
there's a braw day !" "A very fine day, Sir, very warm !" 
"Od, bet it's gey het ! man ! bet ye've a gran' shop 
here, dyod ! there's nae the like o' this atween Fittie 
and the back o' beyont — keep ye ony tibacco?" "Sir?" 
"I'm speerin' gin ye keep sic a thing as tibacco?" 
" I don't know what you mean." " Dinna ken fat I 
mean ! I'm needin' a fuff o' my cuttie, that's a'." " I 
really don't understand." "Weel that blakes a' ! may- 
be ye wid be sayin' ye dinna understan' me, gin I was 
to speer for the len' o' a preen. " " Sir ! " (indignantly ). 
" Man ! ye're naething but a nowt ! an' this is Lunnon ! 
an' a man canna' get twa bla's o' his pipe for want o' 
a preen." And with this he left the shop, followed to 



the door however by a Scotchman in the establishment, 
whose heart warmed to the native Doric, and who 
could speak, understand and translate both the Queen's 
English and Scotch — who supplied his want and made 
him comfortable and better disposed towards Lunnon. 

A Scotchwoman on a visit to London, seeing the 
magnificent shops, and thinking her visit would be a 
favourable opportunity for purchasing a shepherd- 
tartan shawl which she designed for a present, entered 
a fine drapery establishment, and asked to see some 
tartan shawls. A quantity was spread out before her, 
but none of them seemed to please her, and she said 
" Hae ye nane o' a dambrod pattern ? " The worthy 
shopkeeper lifted up his eyes and seemed perfectly 
horrified, and said "No, mem, we have some very 
broad but none so broad as that ! " Luckily an 
assistant — a specimen of the ubiquitous Scotchman, 
heard this, and explaining the term, the cheque 
patterns were brought out and the woman's want 
supplied to her entire satisfaction. 

A servant girl at an Aberdeenshire farm, where 
Draughts formed a favourite evening recreation, having 
changed her place — as the evening passed on without 
any appearance of the "draft board," innocently 
asked, to the horror of her new mistress, "if they didna 
dam here ? for they did it ilka nicht faur she was, last." 



AN OLD PROPHECY FULFLLLED. 

"We could laugh much over him, and love him 
much, this good Baillie. . . . We will point out 
his existence, advise all persons who have a call that 
way to read that same ' contemporaneous newspaper ' 
of his with attention and thanks. We give it small 
praise when we say, there is perhaps no book of that 
period which will, in the end, better reward the 
trouble of reading." Carlyle in a "Review of 
Baillie's Letters," 1841. 

[Strange is it not, that more than fifty years ago, 
Carlyle should have penned a paragraph so pat in 
its description Of the Book-Stall. — Eaitor\ 



Bibles, 



GOOD VARIETY at 

Brown's, • • 

77 UNION STREET 



o8 Brown's Book-Stall. 



MITCHELL I CO., CYC % ENT k 

691 Qeorge ^trcct, Aberdeen. 

BEST VALUE IN 

SAFETIES, TRICYCLES, AND BICYCLES, 

With Latest Patterns in 
DUNLOP, SEDDONS, FLEETWOOD, and 

CLINCHER TYRES. 
Sundries, Parts, and Fittings Supplied. 

MACHINES THOROUGHLY REPAIRED at reasonable charges. 

Genuine Bargains in Second-hand and 

Shop-Soiled Machines. 

Sole Agents for the following Celebrated Makers :— Starley Brothers, Coventry, " Royal " 

Psychos; Newton & Co., "Elswick" Cycles; Hudson, Edmonds, & Co., 

"Hudson" Cycles; Sparbrook Manufacturing Co. 

MACHINES SUPPLIED ON EASY TERMS OR LARGE DISCOUNT FOR CASH. 

HIGH CLASSED MACHINES ON HIRE PER HOUR, DAY, OR WEEK. 




TRY. 



Lnttlejokr\ & Sor\'s 

TEAS and WHISKIES, 

They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness, 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



109 



^4ftJ^J^Alfe-,i?if^ 



4! 



If You Want 




A GOOD BOOK 

To read on your holidays or in the train, or in fact anywhere, go 
to A. Brown & Co., 77 Union Street, who have all the best new 
books, both light and heavy, fact or fiction, 

TO SUIT YOU. 



^^%^ : ^i$^ 




A BOOKWORM'S CONTENT. 

Dr. Sheridan wrote to Dean Swift, then 
London on a visit : 

" While you converse with lords and dukes, 
I have their betters here — my books : 
Fixed in an elbow chair at ease 
I choose companions as I please. 
I'd rather have one single shelf 
Than all my friends, except yourself; 
For after all that can be said 
Our best acquaintances are the dead." 



LEIGH HUNT ON CATALOGUES. 



A catalogue is not a mere catalogue or a list of sale- 
able things, as the uninitiated may fancy. Even a 
common auctioneer's catalogue of goods and chattels 
suggests a thousand reflections to a peruser of any 



knowledge. Judge, then, what the case must be with 
a catalogue of books ; the very titles of which run th e 
rounds of the whole world, visible and invisible ; 
geographies, biographies, histories, loves, hates, joys, 
sorrows, cookeries, science, fashions, and eternity ! 
We speak on this subject from the most literal experi- 
ence ; for often and often have we cut open a new 
catalogue of old books with all the fervour and ivory 
folder of a first love ; often read one at tea ; nay, at 
dinner ; and have put crosses against dozens of 
volumes in the list, out of the pure imagination of 
buying them, the possibility being out of the question ! 
Books are masters who correct our ignorance with- 
out putting it to shame. They instruct us without rods 
or ferules ; without harsh words or anger ; without 
money, and without fatigue. When you approach 
them, they are never weary ; when you interrogate 
them, they conceal nothing. If you mistake them, 
they do not grumble ; if you are stupid, they do not 
laugh at you. They are the most patient and gentle 
of our teachers, and the most to be cherished. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 




Established 1830. 

W.& J. Walker, 

Umbrella 

Man ufactitrers, 

98 UNION STREET, 

Aberdeen. 



The Cheapest Shop in Touin 



FOR 



Groceries, Teas, Provisions 
and Confections, 

IS 

flfontclfs {provision Stores, 

93 GEORGE STREET, 

HBERBEEJ*. 



Sole Agent in Aberdeen for the 

FAMOUS AIMERIA WINE. 



Qreat Variety of 

|JeW ar\d Secor\d-J-lar\d 



LaWrxJMoWers 



at prices to 
suit Ev>er\jor\e. 



Qarder\ Seats ar\d Chairs from 
2/6 vjpWards. 



"Dealer in Tobacco and Cigars. 



Gardno & Darlir\g, 

I I Dridge Otreet, Aberdeen. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



X I I 



The most Interesting and Instructive Weekly Paper is 

%he Aberdeen Elabour (EUector, 



2^. 



PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY. 



o Cv. 



Special Features— 



A SERIAL TALE, by a well-known author. 
A SHORT COMPLETE STORY each week. 

THE MOST INTERESTING TIT-BITS from the Latest and Best Books. 
SCIENCE GOSSIR GRAVE AND GAY. LOCAL NEWS. 
POLITICAL AND SOCIAL QUESTIONS, and Matters of Local Interest, 
treated in an independent and thorough-going manner. 



\d. 



SOLD BY ALL NEWS-AGENTS. 
READY EVERY THURSDAY AFTERNOON. 



¥• 



Books for tbe Season. 



CASH PRICES 



1893. 



Gautier's Mademoiselle de Maupin, 2/8. 

Flaubert's Madame Bovary, 2/8. 

Cavanagh's Scotland Yard, Past and Present, 1/6 

Dawson's Fountain of Youth, 1/6. 

Hutchinson's Golfing, 9d. 

Saxby's Lucky Lines, 9d. 

Jamieson's Mr. Mackenzie's Wedding, o,d. 

Brown's Eleanor's Discipline, 9d. 

Green's Kidnappers, 9d. 

Hay's Old Myddleton's Money. 

Amateur Photographers' Annual, 2/. 

Cassell's Royal Academy Pictures, 5/8. 1893. 

Stevenson's Island Nights Entertainments, 3/9. 

The Humour of America, 2/8. 

The Humour of Germany, Italy, France, 2/8 each. 

Grant's Scotch Stories, 9d. 

Lee's Ottilie : An Eighteenth Century Idyl, \\\\. 

Humphrey's New England Cactus, \\i\. 

Alderside, 9d. 

A. BROWN & CO., 

yy Union Street, Aberdeen. 



FIS HING TAC KLE. 

All the Best local SALMON, SEA TROUT, 
and TROUT FLIES always on hand. 

RODS, REELS, LINES, and TACKLE of 
every description. 

FOOTBALL, CRICKET, and GOLF REQUISITES 
of the Best and Latest Styles at 

WM. BROWN'S, 

6'i George Street, A'Bfi'R'DI?£JV 



Comb, Brush, & sponge Warehouse 



fjair (Eutter, perfumer, 

LADIES' HEAD DRESSER & ORNAMENTAL HAIR MANUFACTURER, 
39 ROSEMOUNT VIADUCT, 

(Three Doors from Skene Street), 

ABERDEEN. 

Families and Schools attended. Lessons in Hair Dressing 
Ladies' Combings made up in any Style. 



I 12 



Brown's Book- Stall. 



omestie Mieles. 







m 

m 



ACCOUCHMENT SHEETS— 2/, 26, 3/6, 46,56,6/6. 
NURSING APRONS— 1/6, 2/, 2/6, 3/, 3/6. 
BABIES' BIBS AND PILCHES— 6d., 9c!., 2/, 2/6. 

BREAST EXHAUSTERS AND BINDERS— 2/, 2/6, 

5/6, and 7/6. 

WATERPROOF BED SHEETING— Single Texture, 
36 in. Wide, 2/ and 2/6 per yard ; Double Texture, 
36 in. Wide, 3/6 and 4/ per yard. 

LADIES' CHEST EXPANDERS— 2/6, 3/6, 4/6. 

THE NEW ACME BRACE— 5/6, 6/6, 7/6. 

INDIA-RUBBER BED PANS— 8/6, 10/6, 12/6, 15/, i8/. 

INDIA-RUBBER URINALS— 4/6, 6/6, 8/6, 10/6, 12/6. 

Hot Water Bottles, 4/6, 6/6, 8/6, 10/6. Draught Tubing, ijd, 2d., 3d. per foot. 
Enemas, 3/6 and 4/6 each. Nipple Shields, 6d. each. Feeding Bottles, 6d. each. Water 
Beds on Hire. India-rubber Teats. Rubber Toys. Baby Jumpers. Water Pillows. Air 
Cushions and Pillows. Waterproof Collars and Cuffs. Sponge Bags. Dress Protectors. 
Bathing Caps. Teething Pads. Finger Stalls. Rubber School Bands. 



EIiRIGK & TOEKSOfl, 

India-rubber and Waterproof Manufacturers, 

24 GUILD STREET, ABEHDEEfl. 



Works— COLLEGE STREET. 



OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION. 



HARPER & CO., «- 

tOiire tOoi?hei?:s and tOiue (Rei^chanfs, 



LAWN 
MOWERS 



A LARGE SELECTION 



BEST MAKERS. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR CASH 




A Speciality. 



Lawn Mower 



Sharpening 
and 



Repairing. \ 



GARDEN SEATS AND CHAIRS. 
GARDEN ROLLERS AND HOSE REELS. 



WIRE 

ARCHWAYS. 

WIRE 

FLOWER STANDS. 

WIRE 

BORDERING. 

WIRE 

PEA GUARDS. 

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PEA TRAINERS. 

WIRE 

TRELLIS WORK 

WIRE 

NETTING. 




WIRE 

MEAT-SAFES. 
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WINDOW BLINDS. 
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FOR GARDEN WALLS. 
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CAGES. 

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ANYTHING. 



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BY HER MAJESTY'S 




ROYAL LETTERS PATENT. 



' The Queen of all Table Drinks. 



?? 



FORBES, MAXWELL, & CO.'S 

GflAffflGflE GINGER BEER 



&S been pronounced by 1,000 of Scotland's 
most eminent Medical Men to be the only 
perfect Health-Preserving Table Drink — a thousand 
times superior to Aerated Waters and Fermented 
Beverages. The patented process of manufacture 
protects the consumer from the dangerous effects of 
lead and other metallic poisons. 

Most suitable for mixing with Wines and Spirits. 
The most welcome friend in every sick room, and 
indispensable on every table. Try it once and you 
will never be without it. 




TO BE HUD FROM EL GROCERS AND CHEMISTS. 



Caution. — Do not be imposed upon. Beware of 
spurious imitations and the fraudulent use of 
this title. The Patentees and Sole Makers are 



Forbes, Maxwell, i 0. lm. Aberdeen. 




Published at yy Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. T9. 



JULY. 



1893. 



TRUNKS & TRAYELLINC BACS. 




The Public are respectfully requested to 
purchase at 

PETEWS 

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IBrown's Hber&een moofeStall 



JULY. 



1893. 



No. XIX. 

" Is there a heart that music cannot melt ? 
Alas ! how is that rugged heart forlorn ! 
Is there who ne'er those mystic transports felt 
Of solitude and melancholy bom ? 
He needs not woo the muse : he is her scorn. 
The sophists rope of cobweb he shall twine : 

Mope o'er the schoolman's peevish page ; or mourn, 
And delve for life in Mammon's dirty mine, 
Sneak with the scoundrel fox, or grunt with glutton 
swine." 

Prof. Jas. Beat lie, Aberdeen, 1735- 1803. 

'' Society, dead or alive, can have no charm without 
intimacy, and no intimacy without interest in trifles." 
"These trifles are the sunglints on the landscape." 
" To feel at ease in any company — or at any period 
— to find the humour of its jokes, the wit of its say- 
ings, and the point of its repartees, we must be 
conversant with the public and private life of the 
actors." 

THE musical atmosphere which made 
itself felt even in the business premises 
of the "Stall," but which hummed 
around Broadford Cottage in a stringy, 
sing-song sort of way, as we have narrated, 
was every now and then agitated by new airs 
and strange melodies brought into it by 
wandering minstrels from the sunny south. 

Although absolutely and entirely unknown 
to the vulgar Cockneys, who conceived it as 
inhabited by a race of barbarian reivers or 
cattle lifters dressed in kilts, yet to all well 
informed Englishmen, Aberdeen had always 
stood out as an oasis in the Presbyterian 
desert. For it had been loyal to Charles I. ; 



alone faithful amongst the faithless, its doctors 
had boldly defended the kingly prerogatives ; 
it possessed two universities ; its musical 
reputation was the growth of centuries and 
the admiration of southrons. Richard Francks, 
who visited it in 1658, says : — 

" Here you shall have such method in their musick, 
and such order and decorum of song devotion in the 
church as you will admire to hear, though not 
regulated by a cantor or quirister, but only by an 
insipid parochial clerk that never attempts further in 
the mathematicks of music than to compleat the parish- 
ioners to sing a psalm tune." 

Even although in this unbelieving age we 
may feel inclined to take this with " a grain 
of salt," yet the very numerous testimonies 
as to the comparative proficiency of Aber- 
donians in music come to us at such early 
dates, and from so many different sources, 
that their cumulative effect is equal to a 
surgical operation on the minds of the citizens, 
and carries with it a large amount of credi- 
bility. In the Roman Catholic church 
services, music has always held an important 
place, and rightly so, for if all things come from 
God, surely we are bound to give Him what 
is so peculiarly His own special gift of music — 
which so enriches us, yet which might have 
been withheld, had we not been spiritual and 
immortal beings, as well as human, for : — 

"What know we of the saints above? 
But that they sing and that they love ! " 

In the revulsion of feeling — in the almost 
inevitable swing of the pendulum from one 
extreme to the other, which so characterizes 
this human life of ours, when the Reform- 



114 



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115 



ation suddenly broke like a thunderstorm 
over Europe ; opinion became divided in a 
threefold manner as to the form and manner 
of worship. The Romanists, fortified by 
centuries of hereditary culture and experience 
of human nature, like the Tories of the 
present day, maintained the status quo. 
Calvin and his followers, Radicals as they 
were, swung the whole length of the pendulum 
to the opposite extreme, discarding all but 
the simplest forms of worship, (and one set 
of Baptists and another of Quakers, discard- 
ing music of any kind in their service and 
discountenancing it as childish and Jewish) ; 
while the Lutherans took a middle course, 
their leader saying, "After theology I give 
music the second rank and highest honour 

. . . whoever despises it, with him I 
can never agree." 

In pre-reformation times Aberdonians were 
high Romanists. The " Book of Deer," and 
the " Aberdeen Breviary," amongst the earliest 
specimens of church services extant in the 
country, have been long celebrated ; and their 
churchmen, Prelates and Bishops, stand high 
on the rolls of fame. The City Minstrels 
were so celebrated, that in 1503, decorated 
with silver badges and the city arms, they 
were sent to Holyrood to grace the marriage 
of James IV. with Margaret of England. 
And when eight years after the King and 
Queen visited Aberdeen, the musical cultiva- 
tion of the citizens is celebrated by William 
Dunbar, the poet, thus : — 

" Ane fair processioun mett her at the Port, 
In a cap of gold and silk full pleasantlie, 

Syne at hir entrie, with many fair disport, 
Ressaivt hir on streittes lustillie : 
Quhair first the salutatioun honourabilly 

Of the sweitt Virgin, gnidlie mycht be seine, 
The sound of menstrallis blowing to the sky : 

Be blyth and blisfull, burgh of Aberdein." 

which is all very well as a professional re- 
ception, but it is more interesting to read that 
music was in such general cultivation, that — 

" Syne cam thair four and twentie madins yung, 
All claid in greene of marvellous bewtie, 
With hair detressit as threides of gold did hing, 
With quhyt hattis all browderit richt brawlie, 
Playand on titnberallis, and syngand richt 
sweitlie." 



While a century after, (1601), on a thanks- 
giving day, all works being stopt, the inhabi- 
tants accompanied the magistrates in proces- 
sion "throw the toune, singing of psalms and 
praising of God " ; a practice, which for the 
promotion of harmony amongst the magist- 
rates, and as a delightful spectacle, might be 
considered worthy of re-adoption. 

When in 1662, Forbes printed the volume 
of music popularly known as the " Cantus," 
he dedicated it to the council, and says : — 

" Seeing that it hath pleased Divine Providence in 
the persons of your Honourable Wisdoms, to bless 
the bench of famous Bon-Accord with such a harmon- 
ious heavenly consort of as many musicians as 
magistrates . . . Yea, the fame of this city for its 
admirable knowledge in divine science . . . 
hath almost overspread Europe. Witness the great 
confluence of all sorts of persons from each part of 
the same, who of design have come (much like that of 
the Queen of Sheba) to hear the sweet cheerful 
psalms and heavenly melody of famous Bon-Accord ; 
whose hearts have been ravished with the harmonious 
concord thereof." 

And that his praise did not go unrewarded is 
evident from a minute of council 18th March, 
1663, bearing that "ane hundreth merks 
Scotts money " be paid to John Forbes " for 
his paines in printing certain musicall songs 
dedicat to the Counsell." 

There is much reason to suspect that in 
regard to a knowledge of harmony, town 
councillors at present have degenerated, and 
in order to restore the ancient prestige of 
Bon-Accord, it might be worth consideration 
whether at Ward meetings candidates should 
not be heckled in music, and put through 
their facings in tune and time. And they 
might also give their favourite song, and be 
asked to read a piece of music at sight. 

That in the matter of taste, the old 
councillors required, and had discrimination 
is evident, for in 1630, the Council — 

"For dyvers respectis and considerationis moving 
tham, dischargeit Thomas Wobstar, their common 
Pyper, of all goeing throw the towne at nicht, or in 
the morning, in tyme coming with his pyp ; as being 
ane incivilt forme to be usit within sic a j unions 
burghe, and being often fund fault ivith als weill be 
sundrie nichtbouris of the tozun as be stranger is.'''' 

The Music School, so named at the Re- 
formation, was the lineal but secularised 
successor of the ecclesiastical training school, 
continued down to 1758, and it bulks largely 



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117 



in our local annals in the appointment and 
payment of its teachers. Dissociated from 
church control, the musical service at worship 
lost its previous high character, James Gellat, 
the precentor of the west church, finding his 
scholars but poor substitutes for trained choris- 
ters, and Thos. Shannon a soldier in General 
Monk's regiment, having attracted attention 
by his proficiency in music, and being bought 
up by some Aberdeen gentlemen revolution- 
ized the old psalmody, and may be considered 
to have been the death of the Music School. 

Before it expired, a number of citizens had 
in 1748 combined to form "The Musical 
Society," which for a period of at least sixty 
years so flourished that they gave weekly con- 
certs during the winter season, and paid liberal 
salaries to the best leaders and performers of 
the day. The musical taste of the city must 
have reached a high pitch of excellence when 
the orchestra was formed of such men as Dr. 
John Gregory, George Skene of Rubislaw, 
George Moir of Scotston, Dr. George Skene, 
Colonel Knight Erskine, Mr. Robertson of 
Foveran, Dr. James Beattie, Mr. Annand of 
Belmont, Sir Wm. Forbes, John Ross, organist 
of St. Pauls, Dr. Dauney, Francis Peacock, 
Mr. Thomson of Banchory, John Ewen, and 
others who gave their services gratuitously. 
But in the course of two generations, death 
and removals weeded most of them away, 
and during the next twenty years its existence 
was merely nominal, and after an expiring 
spurt in the Musical Festival of 1828, it was 
finally wound up, leaving in the care of the 
Professors in Marischal College some valuable 
relics — the president's golden lyre, ornamented 
with diamonds and rubies, a fine picture of 
St. Cecilia, an excellent organ, a harpischord, 
and a large collection of music; regarding 
which it may be asked — Where are they? 
Some of the really fine organ stops are said 
to have been amalgamated with those of an 
organ in the possession of James Walker, 
wine merchant, a music-loving citizen — but 
what of all the rest of the precious relics ? 

We think it is S. T. Coleridge who writes, 
(and it is parodied by Mark Twain) : — 

"Swans sing before they die, 'twere no bad thing 
Did certain persons die before they sing." 



But this could not be said of the Aberdeen 
Musical Society. With that deep philoso- 
phical teaching which underlies the text of 
many of our juvenile stories — Bluebeard who 
so rapidly disposed of his numerous wives — 
was simply emblematic of that fickle fashion 
which never allows its puppets to reign for 
even a single generation, unless there should 
happen to be something immortal in them — 
when Phcenix-like they rise from their own 
ashes. On the Society being finally wound up, 
it might have been proclaimed of it, as of 
Royalty in France in ancient (but not modern) 
times, " Music is dead, long live Music ! " 
The Society had existed for sixty years, and 
during two-thirds of that period it had been 
powerfully influential ; and if during its 
latter days its concerts had been fewer and 
not so well attended ; by its previous teach- 
ings, by the cultivation of taste which ensued, 
by the success of Brown's Musical Library, 
and that of Knowles 6° Sons as manufacturers 
of musical instruments — it became evident 
that if music had lost its temporary and 
intermittent lodgings in the Concert Room 
off Broad Street, it had taken up a permanent 
abode in the hearts and homes of the citizens 
of the " braif blythe toun." 

That this was the case is evident by the 
continuous care taken in the appointment of 
precentors to the West Church, which seems 
to have been always most carefully considered. 
Competitive trials were the rule for many 
years. James Chalmers the printer, certified 
by Burns as " a facetious fellow," and attested 
by the Musical Society as possessing musical 
talents and skill, filled the office from 1774 to 
1797. And in after years the Town Council 
repudiating the local practice of "keeping 
their ain fish-guts to their ain sea-maws" 
advertised in England for skilled musicians, 
and drew from thence John Knott from 
Newcastle, who held the office from 181 1 to 
1824; then William D. Kenward from Dur- 
ham, 1824-28. From 1828 to 1831 the 
office was filled by a townsman William 
Simpson, who had the temerity to engage a 
lady to give a solo at the close of the service 
in the aristocratic West Church — a foretaste 
of " Pleasant Sunday Afternoons " — which 
did not at all please the conservative Aber- 



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119 



donians, and was at once put a stop too. 
After this Edward Peele came from Durham 
for a few months, and then Alex. Colston, 
from the south, served from 1832 to 1855, 
when Aberdeen had become a burning and a 
shining light in music, and had trained up 
sons of its own to fill the places of sons of 
the stranger. 

All these, with other precentors such as 
Wm. Maitland of the East Church, who 
published a collection of Tunes ; Alex. Keard 
of Trinity Church : John Ross, organist of 
St. Paul's; and R. H. Baker of St. Andrew's, 
frequented the "Book-Stall"; drawn there 
largely by the influence of the Provost, and 
the musical leanings of his son. Mr. Frost 
had not a grain of music in his composition. 
Like his pattern Dr. Johnson, he could just 
tolerate it, else the "Stall" employees would 
probably have come into more frequent con- 
tact with James Davie, who became choir- 
master in St. Andrew's Chapel about 1835, 
and who, from 1802 (when he published a 
collection of sacred music, which looks as if 
it had come out of Noah's Ark) up to 1857, 
was a potent factor in the musical develop- 
ment of the city. He indeed was the first to 
project on an extensive scale a Choral Union. 
The members met first in a hall in the 
Flourmill Lane, and latterly in another in 
Crown Court, off Union Street, and the 
bright and brilliant memories of these meet- 
ings will never be forgotten by those privileged 
to attend them. Deacon Robb, the clerk of 
St. Andrew's Chapel, whose duty it was to 
lead the responses, and most gravely and 
reverently to say "Amen" to the sonorous 
voice of Bishop Skinner, was one of Davies' 
choir, and a regular and punctual attender 
the Deacon was. He was a useful, even a 
skilful vocalist, one to be depended upon in 
a complicated passage or a difficult run by 
those who sat next him. But when the 
crucial test of the evening's performance, 
Weber's " Laughing Chorus," came to be 
performed, then the Deacon's geniality and 
humour fairly overpowered all rule and 
authority. Entering into the spirit of the 
chorus con a??iore i he so revelled in it, and 
that so outrageously, that the staid, sober, 
methodical, and musical "ha, ha's," trained 



to run in harness, overleaped all their traces, 
broke away from all control of the conductor ; 
and the chorus, — joined in by the audience — 
ended in a riotous torrent of laughter, un- 
equalled in the writer's experience, save on 
one occasion at an election nomination of 
the Second, or as it was termed the " funny " 
ward, somewhere in the forties or fifties of 
this century. 

At that time there was to be seen on the 
streets a well-known figure "crookit like an 
Z," in the person of Geordie Weir a tailor, 
noticed in Riddell's " Aberdeen and its Folk." 
Small in stature, and so much zigzagged as 
still farther to diminish this, he attracted the 
attention of every person who saw him, and 
he was familiarly known as the " Partan." 
But if dwarfish in body, he was gigantic in 
his own estimation, and had a very high idea 
of his own abilities. Nature, with its own 
way of trying to balance accounts, and pre- 
serve the equilibrium of the race, had 
provided him with an immense continent of 
a wife, to marry whom would have required 
at least three ordinary sized men, and be- 
side her Geordie looked like a very sprat 
alongside a whale. His heroism in courting 
and marrying her was unsurpassed by Jack 
the Giant Killer, St. George and the Dragon, 
or Sir Francis Drake, when in his tiny barque, 
he attacked the huge Santissima Trinidada, the 
Armada flag-ship. He took a deep interest in 
all municipal affairs, attended all public meet- 
ings, and specially those of the second ward. 
At one of these meetings in the Old Grammar 
School he was there, seated in one of the 
factions, but from his small size, practically 
invisible. The candidates were duly proposed 
and seconded in eulogistic terms, and the 
proceedings were about to close without the 
usual fun, when Mr. A. Ewing, advocate, 
known as " Stumpy Ewing " from his wooden 
leg, rose and expressed his great surprise 
" that one of our most eminent citizens then 
present, had been so grossly overlooked — one 
well known to them all — noted for his high 
upright standing, his elevated and lofty posi- 
tion, and his straight-forward and erect walk 
and carriage" — here all looked around the 
assemblage in wonder and amazement who 
this could be, but when Ewing proposed Mr. 



I20 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Full of local interest. — Aberdeen Journal. 



Svo Crown, 205 //., SIXPENCE. 

"3n dftemorlam," 

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Containing 

Portraits and Biographical Notes of 
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Brown's Book-Stall. 



121 



George Weir, tailor, the laughing chorus 
which broke out, and was continued for full 
ten minutes, completely eclipsed Weber's 
musical effort, and it seemed that every one 
present had become a Deacon Robb for the 
time, and was his equal in explosive laughter. 

From what has been already stated, it may 
be considered certain that the early celebrity 
of Aberdeen as to proficiency in music has 
always been maintained. The great musical 
revivals in Church Psalmody of 1754 and 
1854 both emanated from it, and spread all 
over Scotland. And those conversant in 
musical matters know that the criticism of an 
Aberdeen audience as to a musical perform- 
ance, has always been considered by artists 
or artistes as one of the fairest and most just 
criterions to which they could be subjected, 
and was valued accordingly by them. If 
the receipts from concerts in this place so far 
north, were perhaps not equal to that of 
more populous places, the hearty appreciation, 
and the genuine sympathy of the audience in 
good honest work, made up for it, and in 
some cases did indeed far more than make 
up for the smaller remuneration. 

Amongst the wandering stars in the musical 
world who found their way into this out-of- 
the-way place, where he could only hope to 
pick up hundreds of pounds, when going else- 
where he might have shovelled in thousands, 
was that wonderful phenomenon Paganini, 
the most famous of violin virtuosos. And 
coming here as he did, with all the weird 
legends, and the strange rumours of his 
devilish parentage, coupled with his extra- 
ordinary ghost-like appearance, made his 
visit and his appearances in the "Book-Stall" 
one of the most memorable of all the writer's 
earliest recollections. Somehow or other 
Paganini had got an introduction to Mr. 
William Brown, who paid him much atten- 
tion, and certainly no stranger character ever 
visited the "Book-Stall. " Tall, lank, skeleton- 
like, with a pale, narrow, wax-coloured face, 
with no trace of blood in it, with long dark 
hair flowing down over his shoulders, and 
with an uncanny mysterious expression in his 
eyes : — 

"With his mournful look, 
Dreary and gaunt, hanging his pallid face 



'Twixt his dark flowing locks, he almost seemed 
To feeble or to melancholy eyes, 
One that had parted with his soul for pride, 
And in the sable secret lived forlorn." 
His extraordinary genius, "the power of 
taking infinite pains," was made the most of 
by an admixture of charlatanism in his 
character, which mystified his hearers, and 
magnified his powers. He threw Europe 
into paroxysms of wonder and admiration, — 
and little wonder although the boys of 
Aberdeen were awe-struck by his other- 
world looks, and by the demoniac legends 
current regarding him. 

If poverty makes men acquainted with 
strange bed-fellows, so does music, and every 
strongly abnormal faculty with which some 
men are gifted. Hardly any greater contrast 
could be conceived than that between the 
staid presbyterian elder, William Brown, and 
Paganini, whose body lay unburied for five 
years, because he died without the rites of the 
Roman Catholic Church, and was only buried 
by the direct appeal of his son Achille to the 
Pope. The strange conjunction of these 
two reminds us of the lines of Goethe : — 
" Like as a plank of driftwood 
Tossed on the watery main, 
Another plank encounters, 

Meets, touches, and parts again. 
Thus, 'tis with men for ever 

On life's uncertain sea, 
They meet — they greet — and sever, 
Drifting eternally." 

Somewhere in the forties a well-known Aberdeen 
citizen, a little round podgy bodie, who by close 
attention to business had made money, risen in the 
world, and was proud of his position was played 
upon by some of his waggish neighbours, who 
prompted him to accept of an i7iterim vacancy in the 
Town Council if offered to him, which it was ; and he 
rose considerably in his own estimation after acquiring 
this position. For nearly twelve months he remained 
a silent member, but stung to desperation by the 
remonstrances of his quasi-friends on his silence, he 
determined to let his wisdom be known. And on the 
Provost proposing some improvement, he started to 
his feet and seconded it, saying in support of the 
measure, that "if it did not benefit the present 
generation, it would certainly benefit our posteriors ! " 
and then — immediately— he sat down upon them, and 
was astonished and delighted at the merriment he had 
caused, which he thought a proof of his popularity. 



122 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Campbell & Gompany, 

Successors to CAMPBELL, ACHNACH, & Co., 

INDIA RUBBER & WATERPROOF 
MANUFACTURERS, 

18 BRIDGE STREET, 
ABERDEEN, 

Show one of the Largest and most Select Stocks in 

TKUaterproof, Hirproof, ant) 

-» 3nMa*1Rubber (3oo^5. 



CHOICEST GARMENTS FOR LADIES & GENTLEMEN, 

In most Fashionable Styles, Newest Patterns & Select Designs 

SPORTING and FISHING REQUISITES 

In Great Variety. 

Carriage Aprons, Lorry Covers, Cart and 
Loin Covers. 

DOOR & CARRIAGE INDIA-RUBBER MATS 

Made to any Size and Design on the shortest notice. 

India-Rubber Sheet, Insertion, Valves, Packing, 
Washers, Hose Pipes, Belting, &c. 

Sole Agents for ABERDEEN and NORTH for 

The Argyle Rubber Co.'s New Patent Rubber 
Foot Grip, used for Golf, &c. 



3nspection Bespectfullv Solicited. 



PLEASE NOTE THE ADDRESS— 

GAMPBELL I GOMPANY, 

Successors to CAMPBELL, ACHNACH, & Co. 

18, BRIDGE STREET, 18 



CO H LS 

rOR THE FOR THK FOR THE 

OHAWINO ROOM KITCHEN FURNACC 




Earl of Durham's Own Steamers direct from his Pits. 
Special Quotations for Quantities of a few Tons. 



Archibald flenzie 

GOAL MERGHANT, 
#betbeen. 



Finest Lambton Wallsend, Wear Wallsend, 
and Large Kitchen Range Ruts 

For Household Purposes, thoroughly screened 
from Dross. 



.All other kinds of Coal kept in Stock. 



All Coals now charged at a uniform price delivered 
Free within the Municipal Boundary. 



HEAD OFFICE 



Telephone 



1 PROVOST JAMIESON'8 QUAY, no. i 4 

West-End Branch— 3 Summer Street, No. 194 
Central Branch— 86 Union Street, - No. 161 

TOWN AGENTS— 
Wm. Allan, 34 Mount Street, - - - No. 68 
Jas. Rae, i£ South Crown Street, - No. 78 
Craighead & Co., 29 Fountainhall Road, No. 228 
Alex. Murray, 271 Union Street, - - No. 6 
Alex. Rae, 124 Union Grove, - - • 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



™3 



XTbts Months /Ifcaoa^ines. 



July, 1893. 

The Bohemian. And the cry is "still they come." 
Such was my strikingly original observation when I 
opened a certain packet the other day and found that 
it contained something in a bright red cover, which 
further investigation revealed as another new magazine. 
As a preliminary I may say that The Bohemian (for it 
was he, as the writers of 
a certain school of fiction 
love parenthetically to 
remark), has at least 
one strong recommend- 
ation. The price is only 
threepence. Of its other 
good points I will mean- 
time — for as yet it is but 
young— mention only one, 
though I should advise 
the Sherlock Holmian 
reader to buy a copy 
and peruse it before he 
proceeds to draw deduc- 
tions (tak' ten for the 
morn !) to the effect that 
there are no others. The 
feature to which I refer is 
the design on the afore- 
said bright red cover. 
It is mystical, mythical, 
modern, symbolical, in- 
comprehensible, and any- 
thing else you like. 
There is a man in a 
chair gazing vacantly into 
vacancy. That is modern. 
Then there is a woman 
carrying one of those 

wonderful lamps, which an Aberdeen Aladdin (sit 
intae the body o' the kirk, man !) was, I believe, 
the first to patent. There is another damsel doing 
a serpentine, and a third representative of the female 
sex with an unusually large soup plate in her hand. 
When you add to this 48 pages of poetry and prose, 
none of you will, I hope, venture to deny that the pro- 
spective purchaser has not a fair prospect of good 
value for his coppers. Of the contents of the 48 pages 
I'll tell you — later on. 



©ur advertisers. No. 3. 




Mr. d. c. Thomson, 

Publisher and Proprietor of the 
"weekly NEWS." 



Longman's Magazine. Certain circumstances over 
which I had no control, or at least very little, pre- 
vented my seeing this month's Longman's at the time 
of commencing these notes, but that is no obstacle in 
the way of my telling you all about it. There is 
"At the Sign of the Ship" to begin with, under 
which Mr. Andrew Lang is sure to write something 
about what he has seen in one or other of the news- 
papers or the magazines, having more or less reference 
to his pet themes of Literature and the Drama. 
Mingled with this there will be the usual verses of 
poetry by an outside 
contributor-those written 
in dialect preferred. 
Possibly there may also 
be a fairy tale or a legend 
included. Among the 
general contents we may 
reasonably assume that 
there will be one short 
story, an article on the 
Sun or the Moon or the 
latest Comet or Nature 
generally, and another 
(both by well-known 
authorities) on something 
historical. In all proba- 
bility there will be one 
or more poems, though 
these are not absolutely 
necessary. If Longman's 
for July is not in some 
respects similar to my 
imaginary number, then 
verily the times must in- 
deed have changed, and 
the old order given place 
to that which is new. 



Atalanta — Like he of 
Plaza Toro, is always to 
the fore. There are lots of things in the July number 
that the girlies — beg pardon, I mean the young ladies 
— will like to read, and if papa is the wise man I take 
him to be, he, keeping in mind that there is no time 
like the present, that you should never put off till to- 
morrow, etc., and various other equally appropriate 
sayings, will not fail to send in his name as a subscriber 
at once. I might just add for his own private informa- 
tion, that if he can beg, borrow, or — well, otherwise 
obtain a few back numbers, he will find Mr. R. L. 



124 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



CERTIFIED CIRCULATION 

OF 

Weekly News, 

OVER 

246,000 Copies 

WEEKL Y. 



This is the Largest Certified Circulation in 
Scotland, or in England out of London, 
and shows that the Weekly News has 

Over One Million Readers. 



SOLD BY OVER TEN THOUSAND 
NEWS-AGENTS. 



W. & D. C. THOMSON, 

Publishers and Proprietors. 



Aberdeen Office: 18 Adelphi. 



FIS HING TAC KLE. 

All the Best local SALMON, SEA TROUT, 
and TROUT FLIES always on hand. 

RODS, REELS, LINES, and TACKLE of 
every description. 

FOOTBALL, CRICKET, and GOLF REQUISITES 
of the Best and Latest Styles at 

WM. BROWN'S, 

66 George Street, AIBB^'DU^JV 

Comb, Brush, & Sponge Warehouse 



Augustus H. Doisom, 

fjcttr Cutter, perfumer, 

LADIES' HEAD DRESSER & ORNAMENTAL HAIR MANUFACTURER, 
39 ROSEMOUNT VIADUCT, 

(Three Doors from Skene Street), 

ABERDEEN. 



Families and Schools attended. Lessons in Hair Dressing 
Ladies' Combings made up in any Style. 



Bibles, 



GOOD VARIETY at 

Brown's, • • 

77 UNION STREET 



Why Drink Low and Acrid, Barky Teas, which ruin Digestion ? 
USE THE TEA OF HEALTH, 

ADAMS' CELEBRATED BLENDS, 

FINEST AND PUREST ANTI-TANNIC TEAS. 

Recommended for their unacrid and digestive properties, and as affording the best 
Dietetic Beverage the world supplies, and the most soothing sedative to sick headache. 




Prices— 1/6, 1/8, 2/-, and 2/4 per lb. 

GOLDEN BLOSSOM, YOUNG BUDS, the Cream of Tea, 2/8 
y$$ and 3/- per lb. 

Six lb. and upward Delivered Free to any place on receipt of Cash or Postal Order. 



JOHN ADllfflS, 64 GHEEfl, ABEHOEEJ. 



At the Sign of the Golden Teapot. 



Established 1858. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



125 



Stevenson's story one of the best the author of 
" Treasure Island " has ever written. 



Casselfs Saturday Journal was, I suppose, origin- 
ally intended to please everybody. On no other 
ground can I account for the invention of such an 
instructive, entertaining, and amusing periodical. 
Short stories and serials, anecdotes, tips on the 
fashions, ditto on what to have to dinner, notes on 
celebrities, pictures, amusing and otherwise, may be 
mentioned as a sample of what may be found in the 
Journal. The stories are by the best and most 
popular authors, the anecdotes do not profess to be 
authentic, the cooking recipes are — well, just have a 
dish of Ragout a la Cendrillon done a la Casselfs, 
and you'll find life all to short to realize the many 
blessings in disguise that may be discovered by the 
zealous searcher in magazinedom. 



The Strand Magazine. As the time approaches 
when it is necessary for me to say something about the 
Strand, I become much troubled in spirit, for, as you 
know, this, the most popular of monthlies, is always 
so uniformily the same, even to the number of its 
pages, and at the same time so uniformly excellent, 
that an unimaginative individual finds difficulty in 
discovering something new or bad to say about it. 
The other month I hazarded an opinion that the 
innovation of a serial might be an improvement, 
whereat the readers of the Book-Stall uprose in their 
untold millions and wrote to the Editor in tones of 
grievous disapproval, and in a way suggestive that the 



chief merit of the magazine was the absence of a 
continued story. Thus is the poor reviewer who 
wanders from the beaten path, reprimanded for the 
errors of his ways and his suggestions. One plank on 
which I had fondly hoped to again enlarge has gone 
by the board, and meantime, I can only say that the 
British Constitution is not what it ought to be, when 
laws do not exist for the punishment of magazine 
editors who will persist in abolishing the duties of the 
critic by providing such magazines as the Strand. 



The Idler. I've a craw to pluck with J. K. J. He 
at anyrate promised a serial, for did I not see some- 
where that there had been read to the members of the 
Author's Club a story by Mr. Morley Roberts, which 
was to run through the pages of the Idler? That was 
some time ago, but I have looked in vain for the 
fulfilment of the announcement. Apart from this 
little breach of faith however, I must say that the 
Idler is just the periodical to take with you when you 
accompany the family to their month's summer lodg- 
ings at Torry, or venture further afield into the whirl of 
fashionable society at Banchory. A new vol. begins 
next month, so you had better leave the address of 
your shooting box at Brown &> CoySs with the 
necessary postage, and have it forwarded. 

ST. JACK. 

Other magazines received : The Pall Mall Maga- 
zine, The Butterfly, The Studio, Winter's Weekly, 
The Magazine of Art, The New Revieiv, The Theatre, 
Great Thoughts, The Catholic Fireside, and Hie 
Humanitarian, LippincotCs, and the Summer Number 
of The Million. 



Thomson \ Duncan 



Citfyograpfyers, ^ihxminatots, plain anb 
Ornamental printers, 

11a & 12 Correction Wynd, 
J&ber&een, 



SPECIALITE- 
PHOTOCRAPHIC ART PRINTING. 



Josepf? 2lei5 

Begs to intimate that he has commenced business as a 

FIRST-CLASS HATTER, 

in the Shop, 389 UNION STREET. 

The Stock will include a large and varied selection 
of all the Latest London Shapes and Shades in 

GENTLEMEN'S SILK AND FELT HATS, CLERICAL FELTS, LIVERY 

HATS, SCOTCH BONNETS, BOYS' FANCY CAPS, 
and all Departments in connection with the Hat and 
Cap Trade. Please Note the Address — 

m UNION STREET, ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Household Itinens. 



P. BEVERIDGE 



Invites inspection of his Stock of 

Table Itinen, Cotton and Itinen Sheetings, Tomels and Touiellings, 

Blankets, flannels, EiderM)ouin Quilts, 

also Ladies' and Children's Underclothing 1 . 



MARRIAGE AND FOREIGN NAPERY AND OUTFITTING ORDERS MARKED 
AND DELIVERED READY FOR USE. 



39 & 41 ST. fUGflOMS STREET, JiBEf{DEEJI. 

ESTABLISHED 1841. TELEPHONE No. 381. 



MITCHELL HO. 



CYCLE 

AGENTS, 

691 George J3treet, Aberdeen. 



BEST VALUE IN 

SAFETIES, TRICYCLES, AND BICYCLES, 

With Latest Patterns in 
DUNLOP, SEDDONS, FLEETWOOD, and 

CLINCHER TYRES. 
Sundries, Ta?ts, and Fittings Supplied. 

MACHINES THOROUGHLY REPAIRED at reasonable charges. 

Genuine Bargains in Second-hand and 

Shop-Soiled Machines. 

Sole Agents for the following Celebrated Makers :— Starley Brothers, Coventry, "Royal" 

Psychos; Newton & Co., "Elswick" Cycles; Hudson, Edmonds, & Co., 

"Hudson" Cycles; Sparbrook Manufacturing Co. 

MACHINES SUPPLIED ON EASY TERMS OR LARGE DISCOUNT FOR CASH. 

HIGHCLASSED MACHINES ON HIRE PER HOUR, DAY, OR WEEK. 




Brown's Book- Stall. 



127 



Established 1830. 



W. & J. Walker, 

Umbrella 

Manufacturers > 

98 UNION STREET, 

1 Aberdeen, 



Hag Dressing and Dyeing. 

'jK pj" VERY description of Home and 

jgfeAJi LL Foreign Skins carefully prepared 

j&m Wr and beautifully mounted on cloth. 

Jl Hlf Deer Skins Dressed and Manufactured 

^fflBHow. into Hearth anti Hall Rugs. Old Mats 

jSmT « Cleaned, Re-dyed, and made equal 

FJL to new - It i s important that these 

^fllL^P^ goods should be sent to the Actual 

Manufacturer, in order that they may receive immediate 

and proper attention. 

Alexander Laing, 

Rod$er>s Walk, John Street, Aberdeen 
Treasonable Prices and Good Work 

W. JOLLY & SONS, 

Printers and Lithographers. 

23 Bridge Street, 

Hberfceem 



Office of "Scottish Notes and Queries." 



487 and 489 Union Street, 
Aberdeen. 



JIT OSEPfl EI1I1ICOCK, Kex, 

Cabinetmaker, Upholsterer, 
and Removal Contractor, 

TD espectfully returns thanks for the liberal patronage 
conferred upon him during the 29 years he has been in 
business, and invites inspection of his stock, which, for quality 
and moderate prices, cannot be surpassed. 

A large stock of Well Seasoned Woods is kept in the 
timber yard, while the superior facilities afforded by Modern 
Workshops, combined with the most Improved Machinery 
and appliances, enable orders to be carried out with economy 
and despatch. 



Every Requisite in House Furnishing. 
Removals in Town and Country by Covered Vans. 



Established 1830- 



The Cheapest Shop in Toutn 

FOR 

Groceries, Teas, Provisions 
and Confections, 



IS 



^Dutch's provision Stores, 

93 GEORGE STREET, 
HBERBEEJ*. 



Sole Agent in Aberdeen for the 

FAMOUS AIMERIA WINE. 



Dealer i?f Tobacco and Cigars. 



128 



Brown's Book- Stall. 




omestie Mieles. 









ACCOUCHMENT SHEETS— 2/, 2/6, 3/6, 4/6, 5/6, 6/6. 
NURSING APRONS— 1/6, 2/, 2/6, 3/, 3/6. 
BABIES' BIBS AND PILCHES— 6d., 9 d, 2/, 2/6. 

BREAST EXHAUSTERS AND BINDERS— 2/, 2/6, 

5/6, and 7/6. 

WATERPROOF BED SHEETING— Single Texture, 
36 in. Wide, 2/ and 2/6 per yard ; Double Texture, 
36 in. Wide, 3/6 and 4/ per yard. 

LADIES' CHEST EXPANDERS— 2/6, 3/6, 4/6. 

THE NEW ACME BRACE— 5/6, 6/6, 7/6. 

INDIA-RUBBER BED PANS— 8/6, 10/6, 12/6, 15/, 18/. 

INDIA-RUBBER URINALS— 4/6, 6/6, 8/6, 10/6, 12/6. 

Hot Water Bottles, 4/6, 6/6, 8/6, 10/6. Draught Tubing, ijd., 2d., 3d. per foot. 
Enemas, 3/6 and 4/6 each. Nipple Shields, 6d. each. Feeding Bottles, 6d. each. Water 
Beds on Hire. India-rubber Teats. Rubber Toys. Baby Jumpers. Water Pillows. Air 
Cushions and Pillows. Waterproof Collars and Cuffs. Sponge Bags. Dress Protectors. 
Bathing Caps. Teething Pads. Finger Stalls. Rubber School Bands. 



EltRlGK & IW'PHEHSOJJ, 

India-rubber and Waterproof Manufacturers, 

24 GUILD STREET, ABEflDEEfl. 



Works— COLLEGE STREET. 



OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION. 



HARPER 



CO, 



■w 



tOiire Wovkevs and tOipe (Rerchcmfs. 



LAWN 
MOWERS. 



A LARGE SELECTION 



BY 



BEST MAKERS 



SPECIE DISCOUNT FOR CASH. 




A Speciality. 



Lawii Mower 



Sharpening 

and 
Repairing. 



GARDEN SEATS AND CHAIRS. 
GARDEN ROLLERS AND HOSE REELS. 



WIRE 1 WIRE 

ARCHWAYS. ^^M^ MEAT-SAFES. 


WIRE 

FLOWER STANDS. 




f ^s^Ow 


WIRE 

DISH COVERS. 


WIRE < 
EORDERING. 








f WIRE 

WINDOW BLINDS. 


WIRE 

PEA GUARDS. 








WIRE 




DOOR MATS. 


WIRE 

PEA TRAINERS. 






Vv\ 


WIRE 

FOR GARDEN WALLS 


WIRE 

TRELLIS WORK 


XOj 


WIRE 

CAGES. 


WIRE 

NETTING. J 


Q&£# 




'j(\ 


2£ W,RE 

ANYTHING. 



H^OEH STKKT, |^BOT>EEN. 



GOLD MEDAL Awarded for Special Excellence. 



BY HER MAJESTY'S 




ROYAL LETTERS PATENT. 



"The Queen of all Table Drinks!' 



FORBES, MAXWELL, & CO.'S 

GOTPMHE GlflGER BEER 



\S been pronounced by 1,000 of Scotland's 
most eminent Medical Men to be the only 
perfect Health- Preserving Table Drink — a thousand 
times superior to Aerated Waters and Fermented 
Beverages. The patented process of manufacture 
protects the consumer from the dangerous effects of 
lead and other metallic poisons. 

Most suitable for mixing with Whines and Spirits. 
The most welcome friend in every sick room, and 
indispensable on every table. Try it once and you 
will never be without it. 




TO BE HAD FROM ALL GROCERS AND CHEMISTS. 



Caution. — Do not be imposed upon. Beware of 
spurious imitations and the fraudulent use of 
this title. The Patentees and Sole Makers are 



Forbes, Maxwell, i Co.. Ltd.. Aberdeen. 




Published at 77 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. 20. 



AUGUST. 



1893- 



TRUNKS & TRAYELLINC BAGS 




The Public are respectfully requested to 
purchase at 

PETEOTS 

Famed ^Cfunk and gravelling 
Sag J3toi<e, 



Where they will find the Largest Selection in the North of Scotland. 

Having a Practical Knowledge of the Trade, G. G. P. is in a position to supply a 
thoroughly reliable article at the smallest possible margin of profit. 



EMIGRANTS' TRUNKS A SPECIALTY. 

Large and Varied Stock of FITTED BAGS and DRESSING CASES, &e. 
Special Terms to Presentation Buyers. 

REPAIRS CAREFULLY, PROMPTLY, AND ECONOMICALLY EXECUTED. 



54 & 56 SCHOOLHILL, ABERDEEN 



ESTABLISHED 1877. 



ELE CTRO-PLAT ING. 

W ILLIAM BAI N, 

The Northern Machine Warehouse, 
Principal Office— 9 BRIDGE STREET, Aberdeen. 

BRANCH-12 GREAT WESTERN ROAD. 
City Gvjde and Plating Works— 98 COLLEQE STREET, and at NEWCASTLE. 

EltECTRO-PMTlNG in SILVER and NICKEL, by fully experienced Platers, carefully 

and promptly executed in Household Plate, Cycles, &c. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. BRING A TRIAL ORDER. 

CYCLES. — The only Warehouse for a Large Selection. 

SEWING MACHINES.— Finest hand machines. 

KNITTING MACHINES. PERAMBULATORS. MAIL CARTS. MANGLES. WRINGERS. 
PARTS FOR ALL CYCLES AND SEWING MACHINES. 

Repairs. Enamelling, and Electro-Plating 



tot, JOHN T. CLARK, 




Telephone No. 293. 
7 



(FREEMAN OF THE CITY OF LONDON), 

Coacbbuilber 

TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 
H.I.M. EMPRESS EUGENIE, 
T.R.H. THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS HENRY OF BATTENBERG, 

46 Jttose £8treet, Aberdeen* 

Branch Works: BALLATER. 



Patronised by H.R.H. The Prince of Wales, H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught, 
H.R.H. The Duchess of Albany, &c, &c, &c. 

Carriages of every description made to order. Designs furnished. 

Harness for all purposes made in the Premises from Best Leather. 

Stable Requisites supplied. Carriages stored. Carriages and Harness for Abroad a Specialite. 

JOHN T. CLARK, 46 & 48 Rose Street, Aberdeen 




No. 20. 



AUGUST. 



1893. 



Brown's Bberfceen Bookstall. 



No. XX. 



" Here we've a feck o' auld warld stories 
And anecdotes o' Whigs an' Tories : 
O' characters that deid afore us 

In by past time. 
An' pickins fair frae memory's glories 
In prose or rhyme." 
Andrew Sheriffs, Bookseller, Aberdeen, iySo. 

"Antiquity! thou wondrous charm, what art 
thou ? that being nothing art everything ! When 
thou wert, thou wert not antiquity — then thou wert 
nothing, but had a remoter antiquity, as thou called'st 
it to look back to with blind veneration ; thou, thy- 
self being to thyself flat, jejune, modern! What 
mystery lurks in this retroversion ? or what half 
Januses are we that cannot look forward with the 
same idolatry with which we for ever revert." 

Charles Lamb, 



AVING already said that the atmo- 
sphere in 71 Union Street was 
both varied and changeable, like 
our Spring seasons, the readers of 
the Book-Stall will not be surprised if they 
experience something of this variety and 
changeableness in these reminiscences. 

When the Rev. Rowland Hill (1745-1833), 
that truly evangelical Church of England 
divine was asked to preach to a congregation, 
the members of which were very practical 
and fond of having a subject regularly divided 
into heads, while he, like De Quincey, was 
very discursive ; in order to please them, he 
said that for their sakes he would divide his 




discourse into four heads : — \st, he would go 
round it ; 2nd, he would come up to it ; 3rd, 
he would go through it ; and 4H1 and lastly, 
he would go away from it. Now this com- 
prehensive plan seems to the writer extremely 
suitable as a model, save that as in the past, 
so in the future, he means to mix up all the 
heads in a conglomerate fashion ; going round 
it, coming up to it, through it, and away from 
it as best suits him. Yet there is a method 
in his madness which prevents him going on 
at present with farther details of the musical 
atmosphere in which the employees of the 
"Stall" found themselves immersed. 

The musical period attempted to be de- 
scribed by us was in the thirties of this 
century, and having incidentally alluded to 
events which happened in 1856, it might 
naturally be expected that something should 
be recorded of those citizens who, in that 
intervening period, so largely helped in the 
musical education of the citizens. Their 
names may not figure largely in commercial 
enterprise, but those of William Anderson, 
clothier, and Precentor in the Free South 
Church ; William Smith, tea merchant ; 
Arthur Thomson, the local agent of the 
Bank of Scotland, and the first President of 
the Psalmody Association ; James Valentine 
who was conjoined with the writer as joint- 
secretaries ; the conductor or conductors ex 
officio, who were employed and paid by the 
association \ with the names of others still 
alive, cannot be omitted from any record of 
these times, and some notices of them are 
preserved and may yet be given, for they 
were powerfully influential in their day, and 



i 3 o Brown's Book- Stall. 



Bor Qut>door Games 

Try ColUe 61 Harlot, 123 Union Street, 

who hold the Largest Variety in the City. Croquet, Tennis, Golf, 
Cricket, Badminton, Lawn Skittles, Hurlingham, Archery — 
All now in Stock. JUVENILE GAMES a Specialty. 

Fitted Bags, Gladstone Bags, Hand Bags, Hold- Alls, and 
other Travelling and Holiday Requisites. 

Telephone 579. 

Household Ifinens. 



P. BEVERIDGE 



Invites inspection of his Stock of 

Table Irinen, Cotton and Iiinen Sheetings, Towels and Towellings, 

Blankets, flannels, Eider-Down Quilts, 

also Ladies' and Children's Underclothing 1 . 



MARRIAGE AND FOREIGN NAPERY AND OUTFITTING ORDERS MARKED 
AND DELIVERED READY FOR USE. 



39 (S 41 ST. fllGflOMS STREET, ABERDEEN. 

ESTABLISHED 1841. TELEPHONE NO. 381. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



131 



in helping to mould the next generation in a 
love of music. 

We have already said that Mr. William 
Brown had a knowledge of classical and 
continental literature. The first of these was 
derived from his training in the " Book-Stall," 
and the last from his travels. Last century 
the "grand tour," as continental travel was 
called, was the finishing touch of the educa- 
tion of a nobleman, and the valued perquisite 
of his tutor. Mr. William seems to have 
enjoyed this unwonted luxury, for the business 
books record payments made to him for 
books bought on the continent in various 
places. And thus by his travels he seems 
to have got interested in the struggles of the 
Protestants abroad to maintain and extend 
their belief. And on the arrival in this 
country of any of the continental protestant 
pastors his house was always open to them, 
and all the influence he possessed was exerted 
in their favour. 

Amongst the number of such were the 
celebrated Vinet, and the historian D'Aubigny. 
And the Rev. Adolphe Saphir, whose recent 
death is yet mourned, was a tutor in Mr. 
Brown's family, and Professor Sachs of genial 
memory, who from the first was a better 
Scotchman than many natives, was all his life 
an honoured intimate. All these brought 
into the " Stall " wafts of foreign air, manners 
and customs new and strange to us. 

In the first quarter of this century the 
liberty of public meeting was restricted to a 
degree hardly conceivable by us now. Chief 
Justice Kelyng laid down the law to a jury 
thus : — " By levying war, is not only meant 
when a body is gathered together as an army, 
but if a company of people will go about any 
public reformation, this is high treason." 
And the Seditious Meetings Prevention Act 
of 1819 was intended to stop all public meet- 
ings, and was cleverly evaded by political 
parties then giving public dinners to their 
favourite politicians. To be shut out from 
all criticism of public measures was abhorent 
to free Scotchmen, and accordingly their 
attention was turned to ecclesiastical and 
religious questions on which, in the com- 
parative freedom of their church courts, — 
assemblies, synods, presbyteries and sessions, 



— thus bringing down to the commonality the 
privilege of thinking out and uttering their 
sentiments, the Scottish people have received a 
training unequalled in any continental nation, 
save possibly to the inhabitants of the Swiss 
cantons. And the more that this is studied 
the more it will be found that the questions 
discussed in church courts, the apocrypha 
controversy, and in a far higher degree the 
proposed Catholic Emancipation Bill paved 
the way for a free press, and the liberty of 
free speech and open discussion — the palla- 
diums of British liberty. The stir and the 
tumult which the discussion of the above two 
subjects caused in Aberdeen, and in which 
Mr. W. Brown actively participated, was a 
fitting education for the discussion of the 
coming Reform Bill, and that prepared the 
way for the Non-Intrusion controversy and 
the Disruption in 1843. By the visits and 
the friendship of the many foreigners who 
found their way to his home, Mr. Brown's 
liberal education was largely increased. 

And here, although not in chronological 
order, the strange and unusual atmospheric 
wave of Revivalism which passed over 
Aberdeen must be mentioned. 

The Rev. W. C. Burns while a student 
here, resided with his uncle Mr. W. Brown. 
On Mr. Burns being licensed he became a 
great, earnest, and popular revivalist, and 
produced an immense sensation ; holding 
meetings in churches and schools late at 
night, and being followed by crowds largely 
composed of factory girls, although people of 
almost all ranks attended. • It was a wild 
excitement for a time, a reaction from the 
doctrine of the extreme Calvinists, promising 
to all and sundry, an easy entrance into 
eternal bliss without any trouble, or having 
to fight the fight of faith. The employees in 
the "Stall" saw a good deal of Mr. Burns 
and were interested spectators at many of 
his meetings where strange scenes were 
witnessed. There was no question of his 
piety or his abounding zeal, although many 
questioned his prudence and discretion. 
Opinion was much divided regarding the 
movement, some ministers patronising him 
and lending their churches. Others, glad to 
see the careless aroused, offered to assist, but 



132 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



133 



if their addresses bore the slighest reference 
to straight and narrow is the way, etc., 
then they were not asked again, and were 
very distinctly tabooed. 

Such an unusual phenomenon, and so 
unprecedented a thing as a revival happening 
in the immediate proximity of "the dead sea 
of moderatism " created great interest in the 
community, and this interest was kept up by 
fierce attacks in the local press on Mr. Burns 
and all who in any way countenanced him. 
So much so, that the Aberdeen Presbytery 
were compelled to take the matter into 
consideration, and appointed a committee to 
take evidence and report, and this was 
printed in an octavo pamphlet of upwards of 
a hundred pages. The Committee of Pres- 
bytery held thirteen meetings, five of them in 
the Lemon Tree Tavern, examined sixteen 
witnesses, amongst them the leading men in 
Aberdeen, and the editors and reporters of 
the newspapers who were present at the meet- 
ings, and received replies to a series of queries 
from parties at a distance. 

Under the guidance of the Rev. W. R. 
Pirie of Dyce, the convener of the committee, 
the examination of the witnesses was care- 
fully conducted, and their evidence, with the 
written testimonies of others being all printed, 
the pamphlet forms a very valuable contribu- 
tion to the history of Revivals, and to our 
local knowledge of men and manners at that 
time, furnishing an insight into the opinions 
of so many notable citizens. The discussion 
of Revivalism by "langheaded, cannie," 
Aberdonians, makes the pamphlet a valuable 
contribution to our local literature 

It is something to have the opinions of 
such men on such a subject as — James Adam, 
editor of the Herald; Jas. H. Wilson, the 
then sub-editor and reporter ; James Bruce, 
reporter to the Constitutional and Journal ; 
William Clark, elder in Bon-Accord Church ; 
William Simpson, procurator fiscal ; William 
Watson, sheriff-substitute ; Alex. Leslie, elder 
in West Church ; Dr. William Henderson of 
Bon-Accord ; Robert Ness, ditto. ; Charles 
Troup, farmer ; William Duncan, Constilutu- 
tional office ; Henry Paterson, banker ; Alex- 
ander Laing, coachbuilder ; David Mitchell, 
advocate ; James Reid, joiner ; and James 



Kerr, elder in Bon-Accord. And to have 
reports from eleven of the most eminent 
men in the Church of Scotland on such an 
interesting subject. 

Although from the character of many 
members of Presbytery, a hostile verdict was 
fully expected, the decision arrived at was, 
that while regretting the reference to two of 
the meetings where much excitement pre- 
vailed, yet it appeared that in the awakening 
in this city and neighbourhood there was a 
call to increased thanksgiving. How nobly 
William C. Burns won for himself a name as 
one of our most successful missionaries in 
China is well known. 

Breezy although the surrounding atmo- 
sphere then was, gusty blasts of passion and 
prejudice whirling about and raising clouds 
of dust, which only obscured the truth ; 
inside the " Stall "the atmosphere was even 
unusually calm and serene at the time, owing 
possibly to the antagonistic position of the 
three partners to each other regarding it. 
Deeply religious, and strongly impulsive as 
Mr. William Brown was, he might have been 
expected to take a decided part, yet his 
inherited prudence, and the precepts of a 
pious mother conscientiously conservative 
in religious doctrine kept him quiescent. 
Fascinated by the fiery fervour and earnest 
enthusiasm of his nephew, he was yet 
restrained on every side. Like Goethe he 
cried " more light, more light ! " 

Mr. Frost again, with his strong church- 
man proclivities saw no necessity for more 
light — not in the very slightest. With his 
firm belief in the necessity of the "three 
orders and apostolical succession," the whole 
question of Revivalism was to him simply a 
phase of fanaticism. It was not provided 
for in the Prayer Book, and to him that was 
quite sufficient. Forgetting that God fulfills 
himself in many ways, that " He answers not 
always in every particular as we expect," that 
from its introduction to the present time, 
Christianity is full of these outbursts of 
religious fervour, in which, as in every good 
movement, dross and chaff are mixed up, 
and we are to be thankful when the good 
predominates; and not remembering, that in 
the material world " spring thunder showers 



134 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



135 



come up in silent corn blades," he objected 
to all such unusual manifestations as thunder 
showers and Revivals, and put up his 
umbrella against both of them. He was 
barely civil to Mr. Burns when he entered 
the "Stall," and was as crabbed and crusty 
to all who favoured Revivals as Dr. Johnson 
was against all Scotchmen — Boswell excepted. 
And so the cog-wheels of the "Stall" 
machine not being exactly grooved to each 
other, and to the same radius, it was not to 
be wondered at that, when in the breezy atmo- 
sphere some sand and grit got blown in upon 
them, heat and friction should have been 
produced in their motion. But for the con- 
trolling, regulating influence of the old 
Provost, the fly-wheel of the business, the 
friction would have given more evidence of 
its existence than it did. 



THAT'S THE WAY OF IT. 



He pitched his white tent in the wilds, 

Far from the human "set"; 
And with a faith just like a child's 

He said: " I'll get there yet." 

He put him up a case of type, 

A hand-press and a "stick," 
And there, where screemed the owl and snipe, 

He made the letters "click." 

They wandered what he was about 
When in the woods they found him ; 

But when he got his paper out 
They built a town around him. 



A boomerang. — " O, misery," cried the editor. 
"What's the matter now?" "I just threw a poet 
out of the window, and his wife who was waiting for 
him below, has presented one of our insurance coupons 
at the cashier's desk. He had it on him ! Another 
five hundred dollars gone when two dollars would 
have bought not only his poem but his everlasting 
gratitude." — Puck. 



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40 BRIDGE STREET, ABERDEEN. 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



137 



A LAY ON THE MARKETS AND 
NEW GAS WORKS— 1844. 



We know not whether Adam burned 

Sweet scented gums or woods ; 

Or tried a light in any way, 

Beyond the common light of day. 

Perhaps he burned the pitch-pine tall, 

Perhaps stuck fire-flies on the wall, 

We cannot tell, — but this we know, 

For hist'ry in plain truth can show, 

That since his time succeeding ages 

Produced so many learned sages, 

That fragrant oil, and mutton candles, 

Lamps with feet, and lamps with handles, 

And candelabra of all shapes — 

Men — Women — Satyrs — Towers — and Apes, 

Were used to burn the midnight oil, 

And waste the men with midnight toil. 

Till gas bursts brightly forth at last, 
And all these smoky lights surpassed, 
So clear and cheap that carlins eld 
A farthing dip no longer held 
Betwixt their "Shaver" and their snout, 
Till they could spell the scandal out. 

But not content, they said, 'twas smoky — 

And some maintained it had a choky 

Smell— but they had blown it out 

And left the cock unturned about. 

Till Dr. Anderson of Perth 

Produced the finest gas on earth, 

At least so the subscribers say — 

And who should know so well as they ! 

Grey hair can never curl with grace 
Around a stripling's downy face ; 
Young shoulders will not wear old pates 
Nor present, suit with ancient dates ; 
Tho' Adam might full well agree 
With some primeval fathers, he 
With Anderson might make a mess 
If joined in partnership, I guess. 
Suppose, for instance, they were here — 
The case, I grant, is rather queer — ■ 
But let it stand — suppose them set 
To catch whatever they can get, 
By hook or crook, prepared to cull 
And cozen each confiding gull. 
They say no doubt with truth a pity 
The fishwives coming up from Fitty 
To sit beside the Cross thegether 
Exposed all night to wind and weather, 
Exposed to rain, hail, snow and sleet, 
Aye often, often with wet feet. 
Besides, the ladies' morning calls 
Are hindered by the butchers' stalls, 
The fishwives' haddies — garden stuff, 
And poultry not being near enough. 

A sympathetic flood soon rises, 
New Market shares like lottery prizes, 
Are soon bought up — a building raised 
That cannot be too highly praised; 
So just and true in each proportion, 
As if t' avoid the least distortion ; 
By Simpson's Euclid, every part 
Had been arranged with skill and art. 

So large that merchants one and all 
May find within its lofty wall 
Fine shops, with finer goods bespread, 
Where they may sit and wait for trade. 
But after all the thing won't pay, 
And none know that so well as they 
Who puffed and blew up speculators 
To launch out cash like rotten ' taters.' 



But what care they ? they have their fees, 

The Company themselves may please, 

The cash is sunk — they're fairly caught 

And by experience dearly taught 

To look at bubbles ere they clasp them, 

And stroke Scotch thistles ere they grasp ther 

Not yet content our worthy pair 

Forthwith another scheme prepare : — 

" The price of gas is far to high," 

In our good city loud they cry, 

It must be lowered by opposition, 

Two Gas Works ! such a proposition ! 

In truth this most sagacious plan, 
Reminds us of the Gotham man, 
Who when his cart-wheels wanted greasing, 
Put on a third — by way of easing 
The weight on all — the proper way 
To make the gas consumers pay 
A lower price, and mend the matter, 
Without one half the noise and clatter, 
Would be to make the whole concern, 
Men, works, and manager so stern, 
Pipes, purifiers, clerks, and coal, 
All subject to the town's control. 

But by this plan no fees would fill 
The long length of a lawyers bill, 
No six and eightpence sheets be theirs, 
No trafficking amongst the shares, 
So they of course condemn it wholly 
As deep-laid Council-craft or folly. 

But, with our subject to proceed, 
How does their own bright plan succeed? 
A flight so high ! that burial ground 
And building Co's are nearer .sound 
Good common sense. With sad surprise 
They'll find the flat fish will not rise ; 
Who, caught before, suspect the bait 
Conceals the hook they found of late 
Though gaily decked with tinsel gold, 
Nor will they touch it, even when told, 
That all the coal tar will be bought 
By Urquhart for his creasote. 
Tho' both our worthies may maintain, 
That sinking money in the main, 
And sinking money in the sea, 
Are different as things can be. 

The purifiers they may keep, 
For conscience sake and quiet sleep ; 
"Retorts" they'll get at lower rates, 
Than castings furnish'd by th' estates 
Of Auchintoul— cheap as they are, 
They'll get them furnished cheaper far, 
They've but to name the last big bubble, 
They'll get retorts without much trouble, 
And even on this high vantage ground, 
The scheme a failure will be found, — 
Thus proving what we said before. 
That Anderson's more modern lore, 
With Adam's old primeval pate, 
Won't properly amalgamate. 

They'll find they've overdone the trade, — 
Their Gas Works — a mere gasconade ; 
Yet none can say that all in vain, 
Tho' labouring hard with might and main, 
Their own alchemic art they've tried, 
Since free as air they have supplied 
Professor Knight and all his class — 
Nay, all the town — with laughing gas. 



This clever jeu d' esprit, which was sparingly circulated in 
Aberdeen fifty years ago, but which has never appeared in print, 
is said to have been the production of a Mr. Dods (a brother of 
Dr. Marcus Dods of Glasgow), who was then resident in Aber- 
deen and conversant with its society and schemes. 



133 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



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Aberdeen, 



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Brown's Book-Stall. 



139 



XTbis /IDontb's /TCmoasines, 



August, 1893. 



The Pall Mall Magazine. This month I'm going 
to try to be strictly orthodox, leaving the Bailies, and 
Bells, and Fashions, and things which I generally 
contrive to comingle with a few stray references to the 
subject under discussion, severely alone. Let me 
begin, then, with the Pall Mall. We hear a lot of 
talk now-a-days about the excellence of American 
magazines, of the beauty of their illustrations and 
the high quality of their literary matter. For myself, 
so long as the Pall Mall sees fit to remain in the land 
of the living I am content. Like Caesar of old it has 
come and conquered. When the Summer Number 
was published last month, about which I meant to say 
something had it not been for the Editor, who — (What's 
that about me? Ed. of B. B.), I thought the high 
water mark of perfection had been reached, but the 
August part completely eclipses its predecessor, and, 
without drawing comparisons which, as somebody 
says, are " odorous," I think it will hold its own with 
the best of its Transatlantic contemporaries. I 
candidly confess that the frontispiece savours too 
much of Little Folks for me, and there is a peculiar 
picture of a woman in ball-room attire, lying for 
some inconceivable reason in a wood, which I am not 
captivated with, but barring these the number is 
certainly the strongest combination of picture and 
prose that has yet been issued to magazine readers in 
this country. 



The Peoples Friend — Good old People's Friend! 
It's many a year and day since last I looked upon 
you, but the renewal of our acquaintance is none the 
less pleasant to me for all that. To sing the praises 
of the Friend is now-a-days needless, for there are 
few homes in the north of Scotland that its weekly 
coming does not serve to brighten. Though still 
retaining the old and more popular features, the 
Friend is in nowise behind the times. Original 
sketches and essays, original poetry and music, 
standard readings, tips for the peaceful supervision 
of the household via the dinner, and other scientific 
and useful information, backed by a couple of first-class 
serials, both by well-known writers, are among a few 
of the good things to be found in the August number. 



The Magazine of Art. Most of the monthlies seem 
to have made an extra special effort this month to do 
something more than usual, and Messrs. Cassell & Co.'s 
periodical has risen to the occasion with a more than 
usually strong number. Apart from the finely executed 
frontispiece, which, in the language of the peripatetic 
Book -canvasser, is worth the price charged for the 
whole part, there are a goodly number of articles 
which will interest the general reader no less than the 
Art enthusiast. Everybody will read with pleasure 
the first of a series of contributions by M. H. Spielmann 
on "Our Graphic Humourists," containing an interest- 
ing account of Mr. Lindley Sambourne of Punch 
celebrity, and his work, while T. G. Paterson's short 
account of Iceland will find many admirers, both on 
account of the interesting matter it contains, and the 
drawings by Mr. Fellin which illustrate it. 



7 he Butterfly. This new magazine is developing 
into a sort of monthly Punch, and I'm not exaggerating 
a bit when I say that some of the illustrations are quite 
as good as those of its famous contemporary. The 
stories and poems are all eminently readable, but as 
a likeness which not a few of the good people in 
Aberdeen — despite Mr. Wyness and his assistants on 
the Bench — will be able to appreciate, give me the 
picture of the elderly gentleman who leans heavily 
against a post, puffing a cigar and minus a hat, while 
he holds forth in the way we all know so well — " Mos' 
curious thing, earn for life o' me releck wish Hotel 
I'm stoppin' at," (Pause), "no, 'taint the Temperance 
Hotel ! " Long may the Butterfly flutter. 

The Humanitarian. It isn't often that I tackle such 
commonplace subjects as Anthropometrical Medicine 
and the Alchemy of Maternity, but ever since the 
Publishers were good enough to send me a recent 
number of the Humanitarian, I have been deep in 
the study of both. Unfortunately, however, for the 
purposes of this review, it is the July and not the 
August part that lies before me as I write, the more 
recent of the two having as yet failed to put in an 
appearance. However, better late than never, and 
next month I'll perhaps be able to give a few tips fur 
the Regeneration of Humanity (big order tho' it be !) 
which I may add is the laudable purpose this magazine 
has in view. 

Lippincott" s Magazine is a sort of Anglo-American 
production, having a goodly circulation as well on this 
side of the pond as the other. The outstanding 



140 Brown's Book-Stall. 



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They are unexcelled for Quality and Cheapness. 



J. Littlejohn & Sons, 

39 Green, ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



141 



feature is a complete novel, generally by a first-class 
author, and in quantity more resembling a shilling 
volume than what one might expect in an ordinary 
everyday magazine. The trials and tribulations which 
fall to the lot of the righteous have prevented my 
tackling the August tale yet, but if it is half as good 
as " The Troublesome Lady" of the July part, readers 
will have no reason to complain of the story not being 
sufficiently exciting and amusing to suit the most 
fastidious taste. 



The Theatre. Last but not least of the monthly 
pile comes my favourite magazine, the Theatre. I 
believe if I was to get blown up or run down, or 
anything of that sort, and be unable to write these 
notes (such as they are), and thus be deprived of the 
pleasure of wading through the glorious assortment 
of periodicals which, with a view to Xmas and 
gratuities, an obliging postman monthly fills my letter 
box, I would miss the Theatre most of all. Nobody 
who takes the slightest interest whatever in the Drama 
and the Stage could fail to like it. The portraits this 
month are excellent, but it is the "Condensed Dramas" 
that take my fancy most. This month -'A Woman's 
Revenge," an Adelphi Drama of the most approved 
type, is cleverly and sarcastically parodied, and yet 
withal so good naturedly that not even the hero, who 
says "Oh, gur-reat, Hev-vuns," on learning that the 
villain loves the same girl as he does, could possibly 
do aught else save smile. And the gentle reader who 
wishes to do likewise cannot do better than give his 
order for a copy monthly to ye Book-Stall Bookshoppe. 

ST. JACK. 



Other magazines received (which will be duly noted 
in course) are The Bohemian, Winter's Magazine, 
Atalanta, The New Review, The Studio, The Strand, 
The Idler, The Picture Magazine, Longman's, and 
Great Thoughts. 



NOTE. — The Editor requests that periodicals for 
review in this column, as well as publications to be 
noticed in our "Books Worth Buying " page, should 
be sent to St. Jack, 27 The Avenue, Bruce 
Grove, Tottenham. Publishers and others send- 
ing periodicals are requested to note the change of 
address. 



Hberfconiana. No. n. 

When Tractarianism came into fashion some Aber- 
deenshire ladies were amongst its keenest supporters. 
One lady took with her an old Presbyterian servant to 
hear the service, and on reaching home, asking her 
what she thought of it, got the reply, " Oh mem, it's 
vera, vera bonny, but it's an awfu' way o' spendin' the 
Sabbath ! " 



THE F1TTIE ELDERS. 
The Rev. John Thomson, when elected as a preacher 
in Footdee Chapel in 1787, had got the degree of 
M.D., and tradition runs that in his early days, when 
called upon to visit the sick of his flock, his first 
enquiry was whether his aid was required "for the 
body or the soul," because, if in the first case, he 
claimed and got an honest fee for his secular profession ; 
and he took particular good care of all he earned ; 
being a shrewd, business, money-making man, very 
careful, and very economical. 



And "like priest, like people." His elders and 
members of his flock copied him, and the cares of the 
world sat very heavily on their minds at times, 
when, if ever, these cares ought to have been banished. 
At one stormy Spring Communion season the New- 
castle steamer, due on Saturday morning, had not 
arrived the following day, and fears were entertained 
for her safety. The congregation assembled, and the 
solemn communion services had begun, while one of 
the elders, a wealthy man, having a large stake in the 
steamer, was in a fever of anxiety regarding his shares 
in the vessel. Long services and numerous tables at 
the communion were the fashion at the the time, and 
the pride of the ministers, while all the time our elder 
Sandy was boiling with anxiety. At last seeing that 
John Guyon one of the local pilots had taken his seat 
at the third table, Sandy, watching his opportunity of 
handing him the wine cup ; at that solemn moment, 
when all worldly concerns ought to have been utterly 
banished from the mind, could no longer con- 
tain himself, but said, " Hae, John ! is there ony word 
o' the Neto < castle boat yet ? " 

Let us hope that his mind being set at rest, he had 
cause of thankfulness and praise. 



On one Saturday evening four Fittie elders were 
convened to enjoy a cosy snack of supper, some 
unlimited number of jorums of toddy, coupled with a 



1 42 Brown's Book-Stall. 



BEfl. SlEID & CO., Bon-Aeeord Works, Aberdeen, 

Have just received their Season's Stock of Lawn Mowers — over 100 Machines 
to choose from. A call solicited. 



ttbe T"*?** Chief 



Celebrateb / S Advantages. 

" EXCE ItSIOtT 1/ Lightness of Draught. 

Lamn (Dome*, r*% Simplicity of ConstructlOD ' 

— — /^L^J m Cut Banks aDd slopes ' 

Acknowledged to be .gj^^gj^SSga Will Cut High Grass. 

THE BEST MACHINE W^^^e!!^8ilW i ^aJ rf - ) 

in the Market. ~Slli§l8PP§P r Suitable for Use by Ladies. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR CASH. 

GARDEN SEATS. GARDEN SEATS. 

A Large Selection of the Latest and most Artistic Designs always kept in stock. 

Show Rooms— Guild Street and Exchange Street. 

A. & J. SMITri 

WATCHMAKERS, GOLD AND SILVER SMITHS, 
AND PRACTICAL OPTICIANS. 



DIAMOND AND GEM RINGS. 

Cairngorm and Scotch Pearl Jewellery. 

EVERY DESCRIPTION OF GRANITE GOODS. 

TRAYS SIMILAR TO ONE SUPPLIED FOR ROYAL WEDDING. 

Gold and Silver Jewellery made to any Design. "Repairs JVeatly Executed. 

OPTICAL WORK done for the Royal Infirmary and Eye Institution. 



191 UNION STREET \ II 1 25 ST. NICHOLAS STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



143 



clear fire, a clean hearth, and the strict rigour of a 
game at whist, at which they were all proficient. 
Under these comfortable and inspiriting circumstances 
the hours flew by on rosy wings, the toddy was always 
getting better, several fraughts of water had dis- 
appeared, and daylight had more than dawned ere 
they separated, each doleful or cheery according as 
they had lost or won. A few hours after, one of their 
number standing at the church door plate saw his last 
night's partner enter, and hold out his hand with the 
accustomed offering of a bawbee. But before he 
could drop this into the plate, his arm was seized, and 
he was greeted, not with a remonstrance as to the 
inadequacy of his offering to the poor, not at all ; his 
salutation was "Fat the deevil gar't you play the 
Queen last nicht ? " 



DUSTING BOOKS. 



When books are being "dusted," do not impute too 
much common sense to those who are doing the work. 
Take their ignorance for granted, and tell them never 
to lift any book by one of its corners. That treatment 
is sure to strain the back, and it will certainly be 
found that the weight of the volume has been mis- 
calculated, and the volume will fall, which will not 
tend to its improvement. Your female "help" too 
dearly loves a good tall pile to work at, and, as a rule, 
her ideas of the centre of gravity are scarcely strictly 
accurate, leading often to a general downfall, and the 
damage of many a corner. Again, if not supervised 
and instructed, she is very apt to rub the dust into, 
instead of off, the edges. Each volume should be held 
tightly, so as to prevent the leaves from gaping, and 
then wiped from the back to the fore-edge. A soft 
brush will be found useful if there is much dust. The 
whole exterior should also be rubbed with a soft cloth, 
and then the covers should be opened, and the hinges 
of the binding examined, for mildew zvill assert itself 
both inside and outside certain books, and that most 
pertinaciously. It has unaccountable likes and dis- 
likes. Some bindings seem positively to invite damp, 
and mildew will attack those when no other books on 
the same shelf show any signs of it. 




KNOWLES & SON, 

Fruit Growers, 

Are now getting Daily Supplies of 

Splendid Kent Cherries, 

direct from their own Gardens, 
4d. per lb. 

Good Hot-house Grapes, 1/6 per lb. 

Note our New Address — 

77 Union Street 

(Two Doors West of Market Street), 
West-End Branch— 

429 Union Street, 

(Fronting the Arcade.) 

Telephone No. 348. 

Full of local interest. — Aberdeen Journal. 



%vo Crown, 205 pp., SIXPENCE. 



"3n /bemorfam," 

For 1892, 

Containing 

Portraits and Biographical Notes of 
Prominent Citizens. 



OF ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



Worth having and worth keeping. — Evening Gazette. 

Of permanent value as a record. — People s Journal. 

As a work of reference it cannot be too highly valued. — 
Northern Figaro. 

Will doubtless be extensively circulated at home and 
abroad. — Northern Advertiser. , 

A valuable contribution to local history, and deserves to be 
largely bought and lovingly preserved. — Brown's Book-Stall. 



Vols, for 1890 and 1891, NINEPENCE each. 



144 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Campbell & Company, 

Successors to CAMPBELL, ACHNACH, & Co., 

INDIA RUBBER & WATERPROOF 
MANUFACTURERS, 

18 BRIDGE STREET, 
ABERDEEN, 

Show one of the Largest and most Select Stocks in 

Materproof, Hirproot, anfc 

-** 5nfcfa=1Rubber Goobs. 



CHOICEST GARMENTS FOR LADIES ft GENTLEMEN, 
In most Fashionable Styles, Newest Patterns & Select Designs 

SPORTING and FISHING REQUISITES 

In Great Variety. 

Carriage Aprons, Lorry Covers, Cart and 
Loin Covers. 

DOOR & CARRIAGE INDIA-RUBBER MATS 

Made to any Size and Design on the shortest notice. 

India-Rubber Sheet, Insertion, Valves, Packing, 
Washers, Hose Pipes, Belting, &c. 

Sole Agents for ABERDEEN and NORTH for 

The Argyle Rubber Co.'s New Patent Rubber 
Foot Grip, used for Golf, &c. 



3rtspection Bespectfullv Solicited. 



PLEASE NOTE THE ADDRESS— 

GAMPBELL I COMPANY, 

Successors to CAMPBELL, ACHNACH, & Co. 

18, BRIDGE STREET, 18 



CO H LS 



FOR THE , FOR THI 

ttHAWlHC ROOM KITCHEN 



FOR TMl 

F U R N * C « 




Earl of Durham's Own Steamers direct from his Pits. 

Special Quotations for Quantities of a few Tons. 



Archibald Ij^enzie 

COAL MERCHANT, 
#berbeen. 



Finest Lambton Wallsend, Wear Wallsend, 
and Large Kitchen Range Nuts 

For Household Purposes, thoroughly screened 
from Dross. 



All other kinds of Coal kept in Stock 



All Coals now charged at a uniform price delivered 
Free within the Municipal Boundary. 

HEAD OFFICE— Telephone 

1 PROVOST JAMIESON'S QUAY, no. m 

West-End Branch— 3 Summer Street, No. 194 
Central Branch— 86 Union Street, - No. 161 

TOWN AGENTS— 
Wm. Allan, 34 Mount Street, - - - No. 68 
Jas. Rae, i\ South Crown Street, - No. 78 
Craighead & Co., 29 Fountainhall Road, No. 228 
Alex. Murray, 271 Union Street, - - No. 6 
Alex. Rae, 124 Union Grove, - - - 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



M5 



Thomson \ Duncan, 

lithographers, 3tluminators, plain ano 
(Drnamental Printers, 

11a & 12 Correction Wynd. 
M.bevbee\\. 



SPECIALITE- 
PHOTOCRAPHIC ART PRINTING. 



ALEXANDER ELI^IGK, 

Cutler and Surgical 3nstrument flDaker, 
63 GEORGE STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 

(Sign of the Golden Razor.) 

By the introduction of Gas Engine power, all Repairs 
in Cutlery and Surgical Instruments highly finished on 
the Shortest Possible Notice, at very Moderate Charges. 



BROWN S 
NOTED 




PACK 



OF 



PLAYING CARDS 

Is an indispensable 
companion for a 
Railway Journey. 



©ur Hfcvertisers* No. 4. 




Mr. John Elrick 

of Elrick & McPherson. 



Rug Straps 

6d., 11, 1/6 



MAPS 

FOR 
TOURISTS 

AND 

CYCLISTS. 



A. BKOWji & CO., 
77 Union Street. 



ALEX. WALKER, 

UMBRELLA MAKER, 
9 SCHOOLHILL, 

ABERDEEN. 



Orders per post receive prompt attention. 



VISITING CARDS. 

50 for 1/6, 100 for 2/6. 
Addresses 6d. extra. 



A. BROWN A CO., 

77 UNION STREET. 



146 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



Joseph Reid I fm W DYE W °M S > 



Begs to intimate that he has commenced business as 

FIRST-CLASS HATTER 

in the Shop, 

389 UNION STREET. 



The Stock includes a large and varied selection 
of all the Latest London Shapes and Shades in 

Q?r\tiemer\'s Silk ar\d Felt ^ats, Clerical 

Felts, Li^ervj Hats, Scotch Bor\r\ets, 

Bovjs' Farvcvj Gaps, 

and all Departments in connection with the Hat and 
Cap Trade. Phase Note the Address — 

389 UNION STREET, 
ABERDEEN. 



PERTH, 

The Largest Dyeing and Cleaning Works 
in the World. 

Chief Agent in Aberdeen— 

Anthony B. Johnston, 

16 CROWN STREET. 

Goods sent to and received from the Works 
daily FREE of Charge. 

Goods called for when requested, and 
returned to Customers the day they are 
received from works. 

With the above arrangements, Ladies may 
depend on goods being done in the shortest 
possible time. 



vv 




plume? Jplttfence &\jpon 

Furnishing Ironmongers, 



LAMP AND OIL MERCHANTS, 
Bl&cl^mith? and Bellhangeift 



f 26 & 28 BRIDGE STREET, 



\ABERDEEN 



Brown's Book-Stall. 



147 



JAMES EWING 



pbotoovapbev, 



// Crown Street, 



ABERDEEN, 



And at Braemar. 



C. YEATS, 

Cabinetmaker, Upholsterer, and 
Bedding manufacturer, 

1 BELMONT STREET, 



Hbevbeen. 



Ubey ftlfrn't oet in. 

Maurice B.irrymore tells the following good story : — ■ 
When Bancroft, the London manager, bought the play 
" The Colonel" from Burnand, editor of Punch, he 
gave a supper, at which Burnand was the guest of 
honour, sitting at Bancroft's right. At the other end 
of the table sat W. S. Gilbert and Joe Comyns Carr. 
The supper was given, it was soon made apparent, to 
star and feature Burnand. 

At frequent intervals Bancroft would break out into 
almost hysterical laughter at some remark of Burnand's, 
and the "filling in," the nobodies who sat about the 
table, presuming Bancroft's cue sufficient indication for 
them to know how to pay for their supper, were soon 
all in uproarious laughter at everything Burnand said, 
even when he repeated jokes from Punch. 

Gilbert felt his nose very much out of joint, and yet 
could not think of a witticism to draw the fire of 
laughter. But he thought of this. Turning to Carr, 
he said : " Joe^ whatever I say, you laugh at it." 

Carr understood. Timing himself when the next 
roar from the other end of the table was subsiding, 
Gilbert whispered to Carr, "Pass the mustard." Carr 
nearly fell in a fit of laughter, and Gilbert looked 
shyly conscious. It distracted Burnand, who came 
back with a horribly weak joke, which passed with 
only half a laugh from the chorus, who were anxious 
to hear what Gilbert was saying to convulse Carr. 

Gilbert leaned over to his companion and whispered :' 
" It has been a beastly day, Joe." Carr's merriment 
seemed to threaten apoplexy, and Burnand was visibly 
put out. 

Bancroft called down the table : "I say, Carr, 
what's Gilbert getting off to you that's so deuced 
funny ? " 

"Oh, nothing much," answered Carr, wiping his 
eyes, with the manner of a man who had something 
too good to give away. 

Burnard returned again to the charge, and fired off 
something which his anxiety to be funny made dismal . 
Gilbert noted the failure, and whispered to Carr, 
"Can you reach the salt?" Carr pushed back his 
chair and held his sides in an agony of merriment. 

Burnand was done for. He tried another joke and 
went to pieces, while Gilbert and Carr repeated their 
business. Burnand lost his temper, and exclaimed : 
" I say, Gilbert, what's all that you're telling to Carr ? 
Some of those funny things you send me for Punch — 
that dont't get in ? " 

It was a fatal opening. Gilbert answered instantly : 
" I don't know who sends the funny things to Punch : 
but I know they don't get in." 



GOOD T/D/A/GS. 

We are glad to inform our Friends that before 
the next number of the "Book-StaL" is issued 
we will have removed to our New Premises, 

83 & 85 UNION STREET. 



148 



Brown's Book-Stall. 




omestie Mieles 



5» 






ACCOUCHMENT SHEETS— 2/, 2/6, 3/6, 4/6, 5/6, 6/6. 
NURSING APRONS— 1/6, 2/, 2/6, 3/, 3/6. 
BABIES' BIBS AND PILCHES— 6d., 9 d., 2/, 2/6. 

BREAST EXHAUSTERS AND BINDERS— 2/, 2/6, 

5/6, and 7/6. 

WATERPROOF BED SHEETING— Single Texture, 
36 in. Wide, 2/ and 2/6 per yard ; Double Texture, 
36 in. Wide, 3/6 and 4/ per yard. 

LADIES' CHEST EXPANDERS— 2/6, 3/6, 4/6. 

THE NEW ACME BRACE— 5/6, 6/6, 7/6. 

INDIA-RUBBER BED PANS— 8/6, 10/6, 12/6, 15/, 18/. 

INDIA-RUBBER URINALS— 4/6, 6/6, 8/6, 10/6, 12/6. 

Hot Water Bottles, 4/6, 6/6, 8/6, 10/6. Draught Tubing, i±d., 2d., 3d. per foot. 
Enemas, 3/6 and 4/6 each. Nipple Shields, 6d. each. Feeding Bottles, 6d. each. Water 
Beds on Hire. India-rubber Teats. Rubber Toys. Baby Jumpers. Water Pillows. Air 
Cushions and Pillows. Waterproof Collars and Cuffs. Sponge Bags. Dress Protectors. 
Bathing Caps. Teething Pads. Finger Stalls. Rubber School Bands. 



ElilUCK & JH'PflEflSOfl, 

India-rubber and Waterproof Manufacturers, 

24 GUILD STREET, ABERDEEN 



Works-COLLEGE STREET. 



OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION. 



HARPER & CO,, «- 

IDire tCWhePS ond tOiue (Beucbonfs. 



LAWN 
MOWERS 



<4 LARGE SELECTION 



BY 



BEST MAKERS 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR CASH. 




A Speciality. 

Lawn Mower 

Sharpening 

aitd 
Repairing. 



GARDEN SEATS AND CHAIRS. 
GARDEN ROLLERS AND HOSE REELS. 



WIRE 

ARCHWAYS. 

WIRE 

FLOWER STANDS. 

WIRE 

BORDERING. 

WIRE 

PEA GUARDS. 

WIRE 

PEA TRAINERS. 

WIRE 

TRELLIS WORK 

WIRE 

NETTING. 




WIRE 

MEAT-SAFES, 

WIRE 

DISH COVERS. 

WIRE 

WINDOW BLINDS. 

WIRE 

DOOR MATS. 

WIRE 

FOR GARDEN WALLS. 

WIRE 

CAGES. 

WIRE 

ANYTHING. 



HIDDEN STRUT, (LBUTOU.ll 



GOLD MEDAL Awarded for Special Excellence. 



BY HER MAJESTY'S 




ROYAL LETTERS PATENT. 



The QiLeen of all Table Drinks!' 



FORBES, MAXWELL, & CO.'S 

CflmMGIlE GIflGEft BEEtj 



AS been pronounced by i,ooo of Scotland's 
most eminent Medical Men to be the only 
perfect Health- Preserving Table Drink — a thousand 
times superior to Aerated Waters and Fermented 
Beverages. The patented process of manufacture 
protects the consumer from the dangerous effects of 
lead and other metallic poisons. 

Most suitable for mixing with Wines and Spirits. 
The most welcome friend in every sick room, and 
indispensable on every table. Try it once and you 
will never be without it. 




TO BE HAD FROM ALL GROCERS AMD CHEMISTS. 



Caution. — Do not be imposed upon. Beware of 
spurious imitations and the fraudulent use of 
this title. The Patentees and Sole Makers are 



Forbes, Maxwell i Co.. Ltd.. Aberdeen 




-£. 



,rs t 



s 



Published at 83 and 85 Union Street, Aberdeen. 



No. 2 



SEPTEMBER. 



1893. 



HE [ATEST 



City Improvement 



Is the Alteration made at 



83 and 85 Union Street 



By 



A.Br©wn&(& 



T 



he best of it is that instead 



of the Public having to 
pay for the Improvement it will 
pay the Public to visit it. 



BOOKSE LLERS, 
STATIONERS, and 
PRINTSELLERS, 



ELE CTRO-PLAT ING. 

w illTam bai n, 

The Northern Machine Warehouse, 
Principal Offioe-9 BRIDGE STREET, Aberdeen. 

BRANCH-12 GREAT WESTERN ROAD. 

Gitvj Cycle and Plating Works— 98 COLLEQE STREET, and at NEWCASTLE. 

EliEGTtyO-PMTIjiG in SILVER *"* NICK *L, by fully experienced Platers, carefully 

and Promptly executed in Household Plate, Cycles &c 

SATISFA CTION GUARANTEED. BRING A T RIAL ORDER. 

CYCLES. — The only Warehouse for a Large Selection. 

SEWING MACHINE S.-Finest hand machines 

KNITTING MACHINES. PERAMBULATORS. MAIL CARTS. MANGLES. WRINGERS. 
PARTS FOR ALL CYCLES AND SEWING MACHINES. 

Repairs, Enamelling, and Electro-Plating 




lelephone No. 293. 

JOHN T. CLARK, 

(FREEMAN OF THE CITY OF LONDON), 

Coacbbirilber 

TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 
H.I.M. EMPRESS EUGENIE, 
T.R.H. THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS HENRY OF BATTENBERG, 

46 ^tosc Street, Aberdeen/ 

Branch Works: BALLATER. 

Patronised by H.R.H. The Prince of